Online Survey Questions and Answer Types – QuestionPro Articles #answer #riding #gear


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Online Survey Design and Answer Type

So you’ve decided that you need a better understanding of the characteristics of people who visit your website, or of some other business-related question. Developing a focused and effective questionnaire will help you to efficiently and accurately pinpoint the information that will help you make more informed decisions.

Developing a questionnaire is as much an art as it is a science. And just as an artist has a variety of different colors to choose from in the palette, you have a variety of different question formats with which to question an accurate picture of your customers, clients and issues that are important to them.

The Dichotomous Question
The dichotomous question is generally a “yes/no” question. An example of the dichotomous question is:

Have you ever purchased a product or service from our website?

If you want information only about product users, you may want to ask this type of question to “screen out” those who haven’t purchased your products or services. Researchers use “screening ” questions to make sure that only those people they are interested in participate in the survey.

You may also want to use yes/no questions to separate people or branch into groups of those who “have purchased” and those who “have not yet purchased” your products or services. Once separated, different questions can be asked of each of these groups.

You may want to ask the “have purchased” group how satisfied they are with your products and services, and you may want to ask the “have not purchased” group what the primary reasons are for not purchasing. In essence, your questionnaire branches to become two different sets of questions.

The Multiple Choice Questions
The multiple-choice question consists of three or more exhaustive, mutually exclusive categories. Multiple choice questions can ask for single or multiple answers. In the following example, we could ask the respondent to select exactly one answer from the 7 possible, exactly 3 of the 7, or as many of the 7 (1, 2, or 3 answers can be selected).

Example: multiple-choice question to find out how a person first heard about your website is:

How did you first hear about our web site?

  • Television
  • Radio
  • Newspaper
  • Magazine
  • Word-of-mouth
  • Internet
  • Other: Please Specify _______________

For this type of question it is important to consider including an “other” category because there may be other avenues by which the person first heard about your site that you might have overlooked.

Rank Order Scaling
Rank order scaling questions allow a certain set of brands or products to be ranked based upon a specific attribute or characteristic. Perhaps we know that Toyota, Honda, Mazda, and Ford are most likely to be purchased. You may request that the options be ranked based upon a particular attribute. Ties may or may not be allowed. If you allow ties, several options will have the same scores.

Example:
Based upon what you have seen, heard, and experienced, please rank the following brands according to their reliability. Place a “1” next to the brand that is most reliable, a “2” next to the brand that is next most reliable, and so on. Remember, no two cars can have the same ranking.

Honda__
Toyota__
Mazda__
Ford__

The Rating Scale
A rating scale question requires a person to rate a product or brand along a well-defined, evenly spaced continuum. Rating scales are often used to measure the direction and intensity of attitudes. The following is an example of a comparative rating scale question:

Which of the following categories best describes your last experience purchasing a product or service on our website? Would you say that your experience was:

  • Very pleasant
  • Somewhat pleasant
  • Neither pleasant nor unpleasant
  • Somewhat unpleasant
  • Very unpleasant

The Semantic Differential Scale
The semantic differential scale asks a person to rate a product, brand, or company based upon a seven-point rating scale that has two bi-polar adjectives at each end. The following is an example of a semantic differential scale question.

Notice that unlike the rating scale, the semantic differential scale does not have a neutral or middle selection. A person must choose, to a certain extent, one or the other adjective.


The Stapel Scale
The staple scale asks a person to rate a brand, product, or service according to a certain characteristic on a scale from +5 to -5, indicating how well the characteristic describes the product or service. The following is an example of a staple scale question:

When thinking about Data Mining Technologies, Inc. (DMT), do you believe that the word “innovative” aptly describes or poorly describes the company? On a scale of +5 to -5 with +5 being “very good description of DMT” and -5 being “poor description of DMT,” how do you rank DMT according to the word “innovative”?

The Constant Sum Question
A constant sum question permits collection of “ratio” data, meaning that the data is able to express the relative value or importance of the options (option A is twice as important as option B)

Example:
The following question asks you to divide 100 points between a set of options to show the value or importance you place on each option. Distribute the 100 points giving the more important reasons a greater number of points. The computer will prompt you if your total does not equal exactly 100 points.

When thinking about the reasons you purchased our TargetFind data mining software, please rate the following reasons according to their relative importance.

Seamless integration with other software __________
User friendliness of software __________
Ability to manipulate algorithms __________
Level of pre- and post-purchase service __________
Level of value for the price __________
Convenience of purchase/quick delivery __________

This type of question is used when you are relatively sure of the reasons for purchase, or you want input on a limited number of reasons you feel are important. Questions must sum to 100 points and point totals are checked by javascript.

The Open-Ended Question
The open-ended question seeks to explore the qualitative, in-depth aspects of a particular topic or issue. It gives a person the chance to respond in detail. Although open-ended questions are important, they are time-consuming and should not be over-used. An example of an open-ended question might be:

(If the respondent indicates they did not find what they were looking for. )

What products of services were you looking for that were not found on our website?

If you want to add an “Other” answer to a multiple choice question, you would use branching instructions to come to an open ended question to find out What Other.

The Demographic Question
Demographic questions are an integral part of any questionnaire. They are used to identify characteristics such as age, gender, income, race, geographic place of residence, number of children, and so forth. For example demographic questions will help you to classify the difference between product users and non-users. Perhaps most of your customers come from the Northeast, are between the ages of 50 and 65, and have incomes between $50,000 and $75,000.

Demographic data helps you paint a more accurate picture of the group of persons you are trying to understand. And by better understanding the type of people who use or are likely to use your product, you can allocate promotional resources to reach these people, in a more cost effective manner.

Psycho-graphic or life style questions are also included in the template files. These questions provide an in-depth psychological profile and look at activities, interests and opinions of respondents.


Free Sample IQ Test Items – Different Types of IQ Tests #peter


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Free IQ Tests

GMA Practice Items

There are several different types of IQ or general mental ability tests. In general they are trying to measure how quickly and accurately you can solve problems, to give an indication of raw intellect.

The most complex IQ test is a series of tests that can take several hours to complete and can have up to 16 subtests within it.

There are diagrammatic IQ tests which test your ability to spatially recognise patterns and rotate objects and there are more general problem solving IQ tests.

General Mental Ability IQ Tests

There are general mental ability (GMA) IQ tests that measure your ability to quickly solve a variety of different problems from verbal, to numeric to diagrammatic.

Sample and practice IQ items:

  1. If Bob sold 15 apples in a working week, what is the average number of apples he sells each day?
  2. “Pig is to pork” as “Cow is to _____”:
    • Lamb
    • Beef
    • Stew
    • Cattle
  3. If it takes 2 hours to drive to City A and the city is 120km away, what speed was the vehicle travelling at?
  4. If Sally sells more tickets than Betty and Betty sells more tickets than Jodie, who sells the most if we compare Sally and Jodie?
  5. The words “inclusive” and “exclusive” have:
    • The same meaning
    • Different meanings
    • Are the opposite in meaning
  6. If you have a cube which is 5m x 5m x 5m, what is the cubic metres this container would hold?
  7. The acronym RSVP originally came from the French term Répondez s’il vous plaît – True or False?
  8. “Boat is to water” therefore “Plane is to _____”
    • Fly
    • Sky
    • Float
    • Air
  9. The following series of numbers contains one number that does not fit the pattern set by the others. What number does not fit? 3, 5, 7, 11, 14, 17
  10. The word PARTICULAR is the opposite of:
    • Distinct
    • Vague
    • Exacting
    • Fussy

Answers to the above IQ Ability Test:

  1. 3 – there are 5 days in a working week, so you divide 15 by 5 = 3
  2. Beef – Pig is the animal pork meat comes from so what meat comes from Cows – Beef
  3. 60km per hour – Take the number of kms 120 and divide by the number of hours, then you get the kilometres per hour
  4. Sally – Given Betty sells more than Jodie, and Sally sells more the Betty, therefore Sally must sell more than Jodie
  5. These words have opposite meanings
  6. 125 cubic metres – to work this out you multiple each dimension of the cube by the others. 5×5 = 25; 25*5=125
  7. True
  8. Air – Boats travel through the water and water goes through a boat’s engine, therefore what do planes travel through and what goes through the engine? The Air.
  9. 14 does not fit, the others are prime numbers, but 14 is not.
  10. Vague. Particular generally means to be quite specific and exact about what you want, therefore being vague would be the opposite.

Sample Diagrammatic IQ Test Items

For each of the following diagrams, select the item below it which would complete the pattern:

Answers to the above IQ questions


Types of Economic Systems #word #dictionary #thesaurus


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Economic Systems

Types of Economic Systems

“You can’t always get what you want.” That’s what the Rolling Stones sang, anyway (check it out: great song even if it’s a bit before your time). And while Mick Jagger probably didn’t have Econ 101 in mind, he managed to sum up perfectly the core concept underlying all economics.

Scarcity is the fundamental challenge confronting all individuals and nations. We all face limitations. so we all have to make choices. We can’t always get what we want. How we deal with these limitations—that is, how we prioritize and allocate our limited income, time, and resources—is the basic economic challenge that has confronted individuals and nations throughout history.

But not every nation has addressed this challenge in the same way. Societies have developed different broad economic approaches to manage their resources. Economists generally recognize four basic types of economic systems—traditional, command, market, and mixed—but they don’t completely agree on the question of which system best addresses the challenge of scarcity.

A traditional economic system is—here’s a shocker—shaped by tradition. The work that people do, the goods and services they provide, how they use and exchange resources… all tend to follow long-established patterns. These economic systems are not very dynamic—things don’t change very much. Standards of living are static; individuals don’t enjoy much financial or occupational mobility. But economic behaviors and relationships are predictable. You know what you are supposed to do, who you trade with, and what to expect from others.

In many traditional economies, community interests take precedence over the individual. Individuals may be expected to combine their efforts and share equally in the proceeds of their labor. In other traditional economies, some sort of private property is respected, but it is restrained by a strong set of obligations that individuals owe to their community.

Today you can find traditional economic systems at work among Australian aborigines and some isolated tribes in the Amazon. In the past, they could be found everywhere—in the feudal agrarian villages of medieval Europe, for example.

In a command economic system or planned economy. the government controls the economy. The state decides how to use and distribute resources. The government regulates prices and wages; it may even determine what sorts of work individuals do. Socialism is a type of command economic system. Historically, the government has assumed varying degrees of control over the economy in socialist countries. In some, only major industries have been subjected to government management; in others, the government has exercised far more extensive control over the economy.

The classic (failed) example of a command economy was the communist Soviet Union. The collapse of the communist bloc in the late 1980s led to the demise of many command economies around the world; Cuba continues to hold on to its planned economy even today.

In market economies. economic decisions are made by individuals. The unfettered interaction of individuals and companies in the marketplace determines how resources are allocated and goods are distributed. Individuals choose how to invest their personal resources—what training to pursue, what jobs to take, what goods or services to produce. And individuals decide what to consume. Within a pure market economy the government is entirely absent from economic affairs.

The United States in the late nineteenth century, at the height of the lassez-faire era, was about as close as we’ve seen to a pure market economy in modern practice.

A mixed economic system combines elements of the market and command economy. Many economic decisions are made in the market by individuals. But the government also plays a role in the allocation and distribution of resources.

The United States today, like most advanced nations, is a mixed economy. The eternal question for mixed economies is just what the right mix between the public and private sectors of the economy should be.

Why It Matters Today

Half of the twentieth century went down as a global battle between defenders of free markets (democratic capitalist nations, led by the United States) and believers in command economies (the communist bloc, led by the Soviet Union).

The US and USSR never went to war against each other directly, but dozens of smaller (yet still tragic and significant) wars unfolded around the world as bitter fights over economic systems turned bloody. Korea, Vietnam, Nicaragua, Afghanistan, Angola… millions of people died in the various “hot” theaters of a Cold War fought to decide whether markets or states should control economic affairs.

The great irony was that the Cold War finally ended not on a battlefield, but because the Soviet economy finally self-destructed by the late 1980s. For most of the world, the Soviet collapse proved that command economies were simply inferior to the market-dominated mixed economies of the capitalist world. Of course, China – still ruled politically by an authoritarian Communist Party, even though its economy is now more mixed if not exactly free – is now the biggest creditor nation to the United States.

Sometimes, a Song Says it Better: Revolution, by The Beatles

“You say you want a revolution”, the Beatles sang, advising:

“But if you go carrying pictures of chairman Mao You ain’t going to make it with anyone anyhow”


Different Types of Mortgage Loans Explained – 2017 Update, different mortgage loan


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The Different Types of Mortgage Loans in 2017, Explained

By Brandon Cornett | 2017, all rights reserved | Duplication prohibited

What are the different types of mortgage loans available to home buyers in 2017, and what are the pros and cons of each? This is one of the most common questions we receive here at the Home Buying Institute. This page offers some basic information about the types of loans available in 2017. Follow the hyperlinks provided for even more information. And be sure to send us your questions!

Different mortgage loan types

Loan Reps Are Standing By

Did you know you can get free, no-obligation mortgage quotes online? It’s a great way to get the ball rolling.

If you already understand the basic types of home loans, and you’re ready to move forward with the process, use one of the links provided below. Otherwise, keep reading below to learn about the different financing options available in 2017. You can always come back to these links later on.

Types of Mortgages Available in 2017, Explained

There are many different types of mortgages available to home buyers. They are all thoroughly explained on this website. But here, for the sake of simplicity, we have boiled it all down to the following options and categories.

Option 1: Fixed vs. Adjustable Rate

As a borrower, one of your first choices is whether you want a fixed-rate or an adjustable-rate mortgage loan. All loans fit into one of these two categories, or a combination hybrid category. Here’s the primary difference between the two types:

  • Fixed-rate mortgage loans have the same interest rate for the entire repayment term. Because of this, the size of your monthly payment will stay the same, month after month, and year after year. It will never change. This is true even for long-term financing options, such as the 30-year fixed-rate loan. It has the same interest rate, and the same monthly payment, for the entire term.
  • Adjustable-rate mortgage loans (ARMs) have an interest rate that will change or adjust from time to time. Typically, the rate on an ARM will change every year after an initial period of remaining fixed. It is therefore referred to as a hybrid product. A hybrid ARM loan is one that starts off with a fixed or unchanging interest rate, before switching over to an adjustable rate. For instance, the 5/1 ARM loan carries a fixed rate of interest for the first five years, after which it begins to adjust every one year, or annually. That’s what the 5 and the 1 signify in the name.

As you might imagine, both of these types of mortgages have certain pros and cons associated with them. Use the link above for a side-by-side comparison of these pros and cons. Here they are in a nutshell: The ARM loan starts off with a lower rate than the fixed type of loan, but it has the uncertainty of adjustments later on. With an adjustable mortgage product, the rate and monthly payments can rise over time. The primary benefit of a fixed loan is that the rate and monthly payments never change. But you will pay for that stability through higher interest charges, when compared to the initial rate of an ARM.

Option 2: Government-Insured vs. Conventional Loans

So you’ll have to choose between a fixed and adjustable-rate type of mortgage, as explained in the previous section. But there are other choices as well. You’ll also have to decide whether you want to use a government-insured home loan (such as FHA or VA), or a conventional regular type of loan. The differences between these two mortgage types are covered below.

A conventional home loan is one that is not insured or guaranteed by the federal government in any way. This distinguishes it from the three government-backed mortgage types explained below (FHA, VA and USDA).

Government-insured home loans include the following:

The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) mortgage insurance program is managed by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), which is a department of the federal government. FHA loans are available to all types of borrowers, not just first-time buyers. The government insures the lender against losses that might result from borrower default. Advantage: This program allows you to make a down payment as low as 3.5% of the purchase price. Disadvantage: You’ll have to pay for mortgage insurance, which will increase the size of your monthly payments.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) offers a loan program to military service members and their families. Similar to the FHA program, these types of mortgages are guaranteed by the federal government. This means the VA will reimburse the lender for any losses that may result from borrower default. The primary advantage of this program (and it’s a big one) is that borrowers can receive 100% financing for the purchase of a home. That means no down payment whatsoever.

USDA / RHS Loans

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) offers a loan program for rural borrowers who meet certain income requirements. The program is managed by the Rural Housing Service (RHS), which is part of the Department of Agriculture. This type of mortgage loan is offered to rural residents who have a steady, low or modest income, and yet are unable to obtain adequate housing through conventional financing. Income must be no higher than 115% of the adjusted area median income [AMI]. The AMI varies by county. See the link below for details.

Combining: It’s important to note that borrowers can combine the types of mortgage types explained above. For example, you might choose an FHA loan with a fixed interest rate, or a conventional home loan with an adjustable rate (ARM).

Option 3: Jumbo vs. Conforming Loan

There is another distinction that needs to be made, and it’s based on the size of the loan. Depending on the amount you are trying to borrow, you might fall into either the jumbo or conforming category. Here’s the difference between these two mortgage types.

  • A conforming loan is one that meets the underwriting guidelines of Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, particularly where size is concerned. Fannie and Freddie are the two government-controlled corporations that purchase and sell mortgage-backed securities (MBS). Simply put, they buy loans from the lenders who generate them, and then sell them to investors via Wall Street. A conforming loan falls within their maximum size limits, and otherwise conforms to pre-established criteria.
  • A jumbo loan, on the other hand, exceeds the conforming loan limits established by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. This type of mortgage represents a higher risk for the lender, mainly due to its size. As a result, jumbo borrowers typically must have excellent credit and larger down payments, when compared to conforming loans. Interest rates are generally higher with the jumbo products, as well.

This page explains the different types of mortgage loans available in 2017. But it only provides a brief overview of each type. Follow the hyperlinks provided above to learn more about each option. We also encourage you to continue your research beyond this website. Education is the key to making smart decisions, as a home buyer or mortgage shopper.


Different Types of Mortgage Loans, different mortgage loan types.#Different #mortgage #loan #types


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Types of Mortgages: Which One Is the Right One?

When the homeowner approaches the lender and they begin the process of filling out the mortgage loan application, it is a very good idea to know what types of mortgages are available and the advantages and disadvantages for each of them. This article takes a look at one year adjustable rate mortgages, fixed rate mortgages, 2-step mortgages, 10/1 adjustable rate mortgages, 5/5 and 5/1 adjustable rate mortgages 3/3 and 3/1 adjustable rate mortgages, 5/25 mortgages, and balloon mortgages.

Fixed Rate Mortgages

A mortgage in which the interest rate remains the same throughout the entire life of the loan is a fixed rate mortgage. These loans are the most popular ones, representing over 75% of all home loans. They usually come in terms of 30, 15, or 10 years, with the 30-year option being the most popular. While the 30-year option is the most popular, a 15-year builds equity much faster.

The biggest advantage of having a fixed rate is that the homeowner knows exactly when the interest and principal payments will be for the length of the loan. This allows the homeowner to budget easier because they know that the interest rate will never change for the duration of the loan.

Not only are fixed rate mortgages the most popular of home loans, but they are also the most predictable. The rate that is agreed upon in the beginning is the rate that will be charged for the entire life of the note. The homeowner can budget because the monthly payments remain the same throughout the entire length of the loan. When rates are high and the homeowner acquires a fixed rate mortgage, the homeowner is later able to refinance when the rates go down. If the interest rates go down and the homeowner wants to refinance, the closing costs must be paid in order to do so. Some banks wishing to keep a good customer account may wave closing costs. If a buyer buys when rates are low they keep that rate locked in even if the broader interest rate environment rises. However, homebuyers pay a premium for locking in certainty, as the interest rates of fixed rate loans are usually higher than on adjustable rate home loans.

The following table allows you to compare current rates and monthly payments for various common home loan types.

Adjustable Rate Mortgages

Different mortgage loan typesCompare fixed, adjustable interest-only mortgages side by side. Different mortgage loan types

One Year ARMs

Different mortgage loan typesA mortgage loan in which the interest rate changes based on a specific schedule after a “fixed period” at the beginning of the loan, is called an adjustable rate mortgage or ARM. This type of loan is considered to be riskier because the payment can change significantly. In exchange for the risk associated with an ARM, the homeowner is rewarded with an interest rate lower than that of a 30 year fixed rate. When the homeowner acquires a one year adjustable rate mortgage, what they have is a 30 year loan in which the rates change every year on the anniversary of the loan.

However, obtaining a one-year adjustable rate mortgage can allow the customer to qualify for a loan amount that is higher and therefore acquire a more valuable home. Many homeowners with extremely large mortgages can get the one year adjustable rate mortgages and refinance them each year. The low rate lets them buy a more expensive home, and they pay a lower mortgage payment so long as interest rates do not rise.

The loan is considered to be rather risky because the payment can change from year to year in significant amounts. Unless the buyer plans to quickly flip the property or has plenty of other assets and is using an interest-only loan as a tax write off, almost anyone taking adjustable rates should try to pay extra in order to build up equity in case the market turns south.

10/1 ARMs

The 10/1 ARM has an initial interest rate that is fixed for the first ten years of the loan. After the 10 years is up, the rate then adjusts each year for the remainder of the loan. The loan has a life of 30 years, so the homeowner will experience the initial stability of a 30 year mortgage at a cost that is lower than a fixed rate mortgage of the same term. However, the ARM may not be the best choice for those planning on owning the same home for over 10 years unless they regularly make extra payments plan on paying off their loan early.

2-Step Mortgages

An adjustable rate mortgage that has the same interest rate for part of the mortgage and a different rate for the rest of the mortgage is called a 2-step mortgage. The interest rate changes or adjusts in accordance to the rates of the current market. The borrower, on the other hand, might have the option of making the choice between a variable interest rate or a fixed interest rate at the adjustment date.

Those borrowers who make the decision to take a two-step mortgage are taking the risk of the interest rate of the mortgage adjusting upward after the expiration of the fixed-interest rate period. Many borrowers who take the two-step mortgage have plans of refinancing or moving out of the home before the period ends.

5/5 and 5/1 ARMs

The 5/5 and the 5/1 adjustable rate mortgages are amongst the other types of ARMs in which the monthly payment and the interest rate does not change for 5 years. The beginning of the 6th year is when every 5 years the interest rate is adjusted. That’s every year for the 5/1 ARM and every 5 years for the 5/5. These particular ARMs are best if the homeowner plans on living in the home for a period greater than 5 years and can accept the changes later on.

5/25 Mortgages

The 5/25 mortgage is also called a “30 due in 5” mortgage and is where the monthly payment and interest rate do not change for 5 years. At the beginning of the 6 th year, the interest rate is adjusted in accordance to the current interest rate. This means the payment will not change for the remainder of the loan. This is a good loan if the homeowner can tolerate a single change of payment during the loan period.

3/3 and 3/1 ARMs

Mortgages where the monthly payment and interest rate remains the same for 3 years are called 3/3 and 3/1 ARMs. At the beginning of the 4th year, the interest rate is changed every three years. That is 3 years for the 3/3 ARM and each year for the 3/1 ARM. This is the type of mortgage that is good for those considering an adjustable rate at the three-year mark.

Balloon Mortgages

Balloon mortgages last for a much shorter term and work a lot like a fixed-rate mortgage. The monthly payments are lower because of a large balloon payment at the end of the loan. The reason why the payments are lower is because it is primarily interest that is being paid monthly. Balloon mortgages are great for responsible borrowers with the intentions of selling the home before the due date of the balloon payment. However, homeowners can run into big trouble if they cannot afford the balloon payment, especially if they are required to refinance the balloon payment through the lender of the original loan.


Online Survey Questions and Answer Types – QuestionPro Articles #question #answer


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Online Survey Design and Answer Type

So you’ve decided that you need a better understanding of the characteristics of people who visit your website, or of some other business-related question. Developing a focused and effective questionnaire will help you to efficiently and accurately pinpoint the information that will help you make more informed decisions.

Developing a questionnaire is as much an art as it is a science. And just as an artist has a variety of different colors to choose from in the palette, you have a variety of different question formats with which to question an accurate picture of your customers, clients and issues that are important to them.

The Dichotomous Question
The dichotomous question is generally a “yes/no” question. An example of the dichotomous question is:

Have you ever purchased a product or service from our website?

If you want information only about product users, you may want to ask this type of question to “screen out” those who haven’t purchased your products or services. Researchers use “screening ” questions to make sure that only those people they are interested in participate in the survey.

You may also want to use yes/no questions to separate people or branch into groups of those who “have purchased” and those who “have not yet purchased” your products or services. Once separated, different questions can be asked of each of these groups.

You may want to ask the “have purchased” group how satisfied they are with your products and services, and you may want to ask the “have not purchased” group what the primary reasons are for not purchasing. In essence, your questionnaire branches to become two different sets of questions.

The Multiple Choice Questions
The multiple-choice question consists of three or more exhaustive, mutually exclusive categories. Multiple choice questions can ask for single or multiple answers. In the following example, we could ask the respondent to select exactly one answer from the 7 possible, exactly 3 of the 7, or as many of the 7 (1, 2, or 3 answers can be selected).

Example: multiple-choice question to find out how a person first heard about your website is:

How did you first hear about our web site?

  • Television
  • Radio
  • Newspaper
  • Magazine
  • Word-of-mouth
  • Internet
  • Other: Please Specify _______________

For this type of question it is important to consider including an “other” category because there may be other avenues by which the person first heard about your site that you might have overlooked.

Rank Order Scaling
Rank order scaling questions allow a certain set of brands or products to be ranked based upon a specific attribute or characteristic. Perhaps we know that Toyota, Honda, Mazda, and Ford are most likely to be purchased. You may request that the options be ranked based upon a particular attribute. Ties may or may not be allowed. If you allow ties, several options will have the same scores.

Example:
Based upon what you have seen, heard, and experienced, please rank the following brands according to their reliability. Place a “1” next to the brand that is most reliable, a “2” next to the brand that is next most reliable, and so on. Remember, no two cars can have the same ranking.

Honda__
Toyota__
Mazda__
Ford__

The Rating Scale
A rating scale question requires a person to rate a product or brand along a well-defined, evenly spaced continuum. Rating scales are often used to measure the direction and intensity of attitudes. The following is an example of a comparative rating scale question:

Which of the following categories best describes your last experience purchasing a product or service on our website? Would you say that your experience was:

  • Very pleasant
  • Somewhat pleasant
  • Neither pleasant nor unpleasant
  • Somewhat unpleasant
  • Very unpleasant

The Semantic Differential Scale
The semantic differential scale asks a person to rate a product, brand, or company based upon a seven-point rating scale that has two bi-polar adjectives at each end. The following is an example of a semantic differential scale question.

Notice that unlike the rating scale, the semantic differential scale does not have a neutral or middle selection. A person must choose, to a certain extent, one or the other adjective.


The Stapel Scale
The staple scale asks a person to rate a brand, product, or service according to a certain characteristic on a scale from +5 to -5, indicating how well the characteristic describes the product or service. The following is an example of a staple scale question:

When thinking about Data Mining Technologies, Inc. (DMT), do you believe that the word “innovative” aptly describes or poorly describes the company? On a scale of +5 to -5 with +5 being “very good description of DMT” and -5 being “poor description of DMT,” how do you rank DMT according to the word “innovative”?

The Constant Sum Question
A constant sum question permits collection of “ratio” data, meaning that the data is able to express the relative value or importance of the options (option A is twice as important as option B)

Example:
The following question asks you to divide 100 points between a set of options to show the value or importance you place on each option. Distribute the 100 points giving the more important reasons a greater number of points. The computer will prompt you if your total does not equal exactly 100 points.

When thinking about the reasons you purchased our TargetFind data mining software, please rate the following reasons according to their relative importance.

Seamless integration with other software __________
User friendliness of software __________
Ability to manipulate algorithms __________
Level of pre- and post-purchase service __________
Level of value for the price __________
Convenience of purchase/quick delivery __________

This type of question is used when you are relatively sure of the reasons for purchase, or you want input on a limited number of reasons you feel are important. Questions must sum to 100 points and point totals are checked by javascript.

The Open-Ended Question
The open-ended question seeks to explore the qualitative, in-depth aspects of a particular topic or issue. It gives a person the chance to respond in detail. Although open-ended questions are important, they are time-consuming and should not be over-used. An example of an open-ended question might be:

(If the respondent indicates they did not find what they were looking for. )

What products of services were you looking for that were not found on our website?

If you want to add an “Other” answer to a multiple choice question, you would use branching instructions to come to an open ended question to find out What Other.

The Demographic Question
Demographic questions are an integral part of any questionnaire. They are used to identify characteristics such as age, gender, income, race, geographic place of residence, number of children, and so forth. For example demographic questions will help you to classify the difference between product users and non-users. Perhaps most of your customers come from the Northeast, are between the ages of 50 and 65, and have incomes between $50,000 and $75,000.

Demographic data helps you paint a more accurate picture of the group of persons you are trying to understand. And by better understanding the type of people who use or are likely to use your product, you can allocate promotional resources to reach these people, in a more cost effective manner.

Psycho-graphic or life style questions are also included in the template files. These questions provide an in-depth psychological profile and look at activities, interests and opinions of respondents.


5 Different Types of Bank Accounts #different #types #of #business #ownerships


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5 Different Types of Bank Accounts

Although banks offer a wide variety of accounts, they can be broadly divided into five types: savings accounts, basic checking accounts, interest-bearing checking accounts, money market deposit accounts, and certificates of deposit. All five are insured by the FDIC (in most cases, up to $250,000 per account). Most banks offer all of these types of accounts, so the bank you choose probably won’t restrict this decision, although it does make sense to choose the account type you want first, so you can focus on that type as you shop around to various banks.

Here is a brief description of each type of account:

Savings Accounts

These are intended to provide an incentive for you to save money.

You can make deposits and withdrawals, but usually can’t write checks. They usually pay an interest rate that’s higher than a checking account, but lower than a money market account or CD. Some savings accounts have a passbook, in which transactions are logged in a small booklet that you keep, while others have a monthly or quarterly statement detailing the transactions. Some savings accounts charge a fee if your balance falls below a specified minimum.

Basic Checking Accounts

Sometimes also called “no frills” accounts, these offer a limited set of services at a low cost.

You’ll be able to perform basic functions, such as check writing, but they lack some of the bells and whistles of more comprehensive accounts. They usually do not pay interest, and they may restrict or impose additional fees for excessive activity, such as writing more than a certain number of checks per month.

Interest-Bearing Checking Accounts

In contrast to “no frills” accounts, these offer a more comprehensive set of services, but usually at a higher cost. Also, unlike a basic checking account, you are usually able to write an unlimited number of checks. Checking accounts which pay interest are sometimes referred to as negotiable order of withdrawal (NOW ) accounts. The interest rate often depends on how large the balance in the account is, and most charge a monthly service fee if your balance falls below a preset level.

Money Market Deposit Accounts (MMDAs)

These accounts invest your balance in short-term debt such as commercial paper, Treasury Bills, or CDs. The rates they offer tend to be slightly higher than those on interest-bearing checking accounts, but they usually require a higher minimum balance to start earning interest. These accounts provide only limited check writing privileges (three transfers by check, and six total transfers, per month), and often impose a service fee if your balance falls below a certain level.

Certificates of Deposit (CDs)

These are also known as “time deposits “, because the account holder has agreed to keep the money in the account for a specified amount of time, anywhere from three months to six years.

Because the money will be inaccessible, the account holder is rewarded with a higher interest rate, with the rate increasing as the duration increases. There is a substantial penalty for early withdrawal, so don’t select this option if you think you might need the money before the time period is over (the “maturity date”).


Free Sample IQ Test Items – Different Types of IQ Tests #need


#iq questions with answers

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Free IQ Tests

GMA Practice Items

There are several different types of IQ or general mental ability tests. In general they are trying to measure how quickly and accurately you can solve problems, to give an indication of raw intellect.

The most complex IQ test is a series of tests that can take several hours to complete and can have up to 16 subtests within it.

There are diagrammatic IQ tests which test your ability to spatially recognise patterns and rotate objects and there are more general problem solving IQ tests.

General Mental Ability IQ Tests

There are general mental ability (GMA) IQ tests that measure your ability to quickly solve a variety of different problems from verbal, to numeric to diagrammatic.

Sample and practice IQ items:

  1. If Bob sold 15 apples in a working week, what is the average number of apples he sells each day?
  2. “Pig is to pork” as “Cow is to _____”:
    • Lamb
    • Beef
    • Stew
    • Cattle
  3. If it takes 2 hours to drive to City A and the city is 120km away, what speed was the vehicle travelling at?
  4. If Sally sells more tickets than Betty and Betty sells more tickets than Jodie, who sells the most if we compare Sally and Jodie?
  5. The words “inclusive” and “exclusive” have:
    • The same meaning
    • Different meanings
    • Are the opposite in meaning
  6. If you have a cube which is 5m x 5m x 5m, what is the cubic metres this container would hold?
  7. The acronym RSVP originally came from the French term Répondez s’il vous plaît – True or False?
  8. “Boat is to water” therefore “Plane is to _____”
    • Fly
    • Sky
    • Float
    • Air
  9. The following series of numbers contains one number that does not fit the pattern set by the others. What number does not fit? 3, 5, 7, 11, 14, 17
  10. The word PARTICULAR is the opposite of:
    • Distinct
    • Vague
    • Exacting
    • Fussy

Answers to the above IQ Ability Test:

  1. 3 – there are 5 days in a working week, so you divide 15 by 5 = 3
  2. Beef – Pig is the animal pork meat comes from so what meat comes from Cows – Beef
  3. 60km per hour – Take the number of kms 120 and divide by the number of hours, then you get the kilometres per hour
  4. Sally – Given Betty sells more than Jodie, and Sally sells more the Betty, therefore Sally must sell more than Jodie
  5. These words have opposite meanings
  6. 125 cubic metres – to work this out you multiple each dimension of the cube by the others. 5×5 = 25; 25*5=125
  7. True
  8. Air – Boats travel through the water and water goes through a boat’s engine, therefore what do planes travel through and what goes through the engine? The Air.
  9. 14 does not fit, the others are prime numbers, but 14 is not.
  10. Vague. Particular generally means to be quite specific and exact about what you want, therefore being vague would be the opposite.

Sample Diagrammatic IQ Test Items

For each of the following diagrams, select the item below it which would complete the pattern:

Answers to the above IQ questions