Math Riddles: Try to answer these brain teasers and math riddles #answer


#answers to riddles

#

Math Riddles

Riddle 8

Three Brothers on a Farm

Three brothers live in a farm. They agreed to buy new seeds: Adam and Ben would go and Charlie stayed to protect fields. Ben bought 75 sacks of wheat in the market whereas Adam bought 45 sacks. At home, they split the sacks equally. Charlie had paid 1400 dollars for the wheat. How much dollars did Ben and Adam get of the sum, considering equal split of the sacks?

Every farmer’s part is 1/3(45+75) = 40 sacks.
Charlie paid $1400 for 40 sacks, then 1 sack costs $1400/40 = $35/sack.

Adam got $35*(45-40)=35*5 = $175.
Ben got $35*(75-40)=35*35 = $1225.
Answer: Ben $1225, Adam $175

Riddle 9

The Insurance Salesman

An insurance salesman walk up to house and knocks on the door. A woman answers, and he asks her how many children she has and how old they are. She says I will give you a hint. If you multiply the 3 children’s ages, you get 36. He says this is not enough information. So she gives a him 2 nd hint. If you add up the children’s ages, the sum is the number on the house next door. He goes next door and looks at the house number and says this is still not enough information. So she says she’ll give him one last hint which is that her oldest of the 3 plays piano.

Why would he need to go back to get the last hint after seeing the number on the house next door?

Because the sum of their ages ( the number on the house) is ambiguous and could refer to more than 1 trio of factors.

Answer to Riddle

If you list out the trio of factors that multiply to 36 and their sums, you get.

  • 1 1 36 = 38
  • 1 2 18 = 21
  • 1 3 12 = 16
  • 1 4 9 = 14
  • 6 6 1 = 13
  • 2 2 9 = 13
  • 2 3 6 = 11
  • 3 3 4 = 10

Since the number on the house next door is not enough information there must be more than 1 factor trio that sums up to it, leaving two possibilities: < 6, 6, 1>. <2, 2, 9>. When she says her ‘oldest’ you know it can not be <6,6,1> since she would have two ‘older’ sons not an ‘oldest’.

Riddle 10

This is a famous one. The classic Monty hall riddle!

You are confronted by 3 doors. Behind one of them is a car, behind the two others, you will only see a goat. Now, if you correctly pick the car, you win the car. Otherwise, if you get one of the 2 goats, you don’t get the car.

So, pick any door. It doesn’t matter which one, but we will suppose that you picked door #2, as an example.

Now, after you have picked a door and before finding out what is actually behind it, you are shown a goat behind one of the other doors.(Remember there has to be a goat in 1 of the doors that you have not picked. )

Let’s say you choose door #2, as shown above. For example’s sake, let’s say there’s a goat in door 1. The question and the riddle is. should you switch the door that you picked? In other words, in this example, should you now choose door 3? Or, should you stick with your first choice (door #2)?

There actually is a mathematically correct answer to this riddle: You should indeed change your choice. If you don’t believe me, just try out our free online Monty hall simulation .

Riddle 11

If 9999 = 4, 8888 = 8, 1816 = 6, 1212 = 0, then 1919 =

Look at how many closed areas there are.

  • 9999 has 4 closed areas (the top of the ‘9’)
  • 8888 has 8 closed areas, the top and bottom parts of the 8 and there are no other digits
  • 1816 has 3 closed areas, (top and bottom of 8 and bottom of 6, and it has 2 other digits ( 3*2=6)
  • 1212 has 0 closed areas,(0*4=0)
Riddle 12

An athlete is able to jump FOREVER. However, everytime that she jumps she gets a bit more tired, and every jump goes $$ \frac 1 2 $$ as far as her prior jump. Now, for her very first jump, she goes $$ \frac 1 2 $$ of a foot.

On her second jump, she goes $$ \frac 1 4 $$ of a foot, and so on and so forth. The beginning of her journey is shown in the gif below.

How many jumps does it take for her to travel 1 foot?

She will never get to the 1 foot mark because you keep adding smaller and smaller amounts!

Other Good Riddles

Quick summary of riddle: Zeno of Elea (490-425 BC) is known for creating many paradoxes which were debated by mathematicians for centuries. His riddle involving Achilles, the character from Homer’s Iliad and a tortoise went something like:

The tortoise challenged Achilles to a race and Achilles, full of typical hubris, accepted and even gave the Tortoise a 10 foot head start. Before the race started, the tortoise told Achilles that the reason Achilles would lose is that even though Achilles would be catching up, the tortoise would always be moving ahead. Therefore, Achilles would always be covering a fraction of the distance between the two. Let’s say he covered half of the distance in 1 second (5 feet) and then in the next he covered half of the new distance, the remaining 5 feet plus the Tortoise’s new distance. In the end, the tortoise convinced Achilles that he could not win the race because although he would be getting closer and closer, he would still always be covering smaller and smaller fractions of the total distance between the two. Therefore, Achilles forfeited the race. To read this riddle in a modern narrative form click here .


Try Playing Family Feud in the Classroom: A Fun Inter-Class Game #answer


#family feud questions and answers

#

Of course, Family Feud is a well-known game. Play the game in the classroom for a fun twist. It is easy to play and costs nothing but a bit of time. This game is best played when you can involve another classroom. In this way, a class can receive a variety of answers and you can teach cooperation among unrelated groups. You can even use this game as a lesson in diversity as you focus on specific cultural activities or foods. Students may be surprised at what they can learn from each other by playing this simple and fun educational game.

This game can be modified to fit the needs of the classroom in consideration of group size and timing. To describe this game I am going to base it on two classes of fifteen working together. Feel free to modify it as you see fit. Also, this version involves family members. To create the game, both classrooms will need to do the following:

  • Break the students up into two groups. These will be the “families”.
  • Have the students come up with “survey questions”. Organize the questions so that you have a list of twenty questions.
  • Have the students take the questions home and ask 1-2 people in their family answers to the questions. Sample questions are listed later in this article.
  • When the questions come back, have the children group like answers. Tally up the top three to five answers. At this point, each of the twenty questions should have three to five top answers.
  • Trade questions with the other class to use to play the game.

As you can see, this activity is one to be done over a week’s time. Begin on Monday and actually play the game on Friday. To play the game, play it almost as you see it on the television show. Have the groups separate. For each question, ask a different student. He or she must consult with “family” for the answer. Points are tallied based upon the number of answers that were given when surveyed. For example, if answer number one had that answer from thirty parents, then that answer would be worth thirty points.

Here are some sample questions:

  • Name three vegetables kids hate to eat.
  • Name something you make out of flour.
  • Name the most common handheld electronic gadgets
  • Name the top activities that kids do in the summer.
  • Name the most popular TV shows.
  • Name the most dreaded household chores.
  • Name the most popular skateboarding tricks.
  • Name the things used in a garden.
  • Name things that girls do at a slumber party.
  • Name games to be played on the playground.

The questions should be designed to provoke more than one answer. The students can have fun with these questions, and will be using several types of skills to work on this project. Mathematical skills, deductive reasoning and responsibility are a few. This game can also be combined with learning themes for the week or month. For instance, if the theme is gardening, you might want to ask students to focus their questions on plants, gardening supplies or techniques. Remember, Family Feud in the classroom is just another fun learning tool to incorporate into your current lesson plans! Get creative and find new ways to use this game to your educational advantage!


Math Riddles: Try to answer these brain teasers and math riddles #bible


#answers to riddles

#

Math Riddles

Riddle 8

Three Brothers on a Farm

Three brothers live in a farm. They agreed to buy new seeds: Adam and Ben would go and Charlie stayed to protect fields. Ben bought 75 sacks of wheat in the market whereas Adam bought 45 sacks. At home, they split the sacks equally. Charlie had paid 1400 dollars for the wheat. How much dollars did Ben and Adam get of the sum, considering equal split of the sacks?

Every farmer’s part is 1/3(45+75) = 40 sacks.
Charlie paid $1400 for 40 sacks, then 1 sack costs $1400/40 = $35/sack.

Adam got $35*(45-40)=35*5 = $175.
Ben got $35*(75-40)=35*35 = $1225.
Answer: Ben $1225, Adam $175

Riddle 9

The Insurance Salesman

An insurance salesman walk up to house and knocks on the door. A woman answers, and he asks her how many children she has and how old they are. She says I will give you a hint. If you multiply the 3 children’s ages, you get 36. He says this is not enough information. So she gives a him 2 nd hint. If you add up the children’s ages, the sum is the number on the house next door. He goes next door and looks at the house number and says this is still not enough information. So she says she’ll give him one last hint which is that her oldest of the 3 plays piano.

Why would he need to go back to get the last hint after seeing the number on the house next door?

Because the sum of their ages ( the number on the house) is ambiguous and could refer to more than 1 trio of factors.

Answer to Riddle

If you list out the trio of factors that multiply to 36 and their sums, you get.

  • 1 1 36 = 38
  • 1 2 18 = 21
  • 1 3 12 = 16
  • 1 4 9 = 14
  • 6 6 1 = 13
  • 2 2 9 = 13
  • 2 3 6 = 11
  • 3 3 4 = 10

Since the number on the house next door is not enough information there must be more than 1 factor trio that sums up to it, leaving two possibilities: < 6, 6, 1>. <2, 2, 9>. When she says her ‘oldest’ you know it can not be <6,6,1> since she would have two ‘older’ sons not an ‘oldest’.

Riddle 10

This is a famous one. The classic Monty hall riddle!

You are confronted by 3 doors. Behind one of them is a car, behind the two others, you will only see a goat. Now, if you correctly pick the car, you win the car. Otherwise, if you get one of the 2 goats, you don’t get the car.

So, pick any door. It doesn’t matter which one, but we will suppose that you picked door #2, as an example.

Now, after you have picked a door and before finding out what is actually behind it, you are shown a goat behind one of the other doors.(Remember there has to be a goat in 1 of the doors that you have not picked. )

Let’s say you choose door #2, as shown above. For example’s sake, let’s say there’s a goat in door 1. The question and the riddle is. should you switch the door that you picked? In other words, in this example, should you now choose door 3? Or, should you stick with your first choice (door #2)?

There actually is a mathematically correct answer to this riddle: You should indeed change your choice. If you don’t believe me, just try out our free online Monty hall simulation .

Riddle 11

If 9999 = 4, 8888 = 8, 1816 = 6, 1212 = 0, then 1919 =

Look at how many closed areas there are.

  • 9999 has 4 closed areas (the top of the ‘9’)
  • 8888 has 8 closed areas, the top and bottom parts of the 8 and there are no other digits
  • 1816 has 3 closed areas, (top and bottom of 8 and bottom of 6, and it has 2 other digits ( 3*2=6)
  • 1212 has 0 closed areas,(0*4=0)
Riddle 12

An athlete is able to jump FOREVER. However, everytime that she jumps she gets a bit more tired, and every jump goes $$ \frac 1 2 $$ as far as her prior jump. Now, for her very first jump, she goes $$ \frac 1 2 $$ of a foot.

On her second jump, she goes $$ \frac 1 4 $$ of a foot, and so on and so forth. The beginning of her journey is shown in the gif below.

How many jumps does it take for her to travel 1 foot?

She will never get to the 1 foot mark because you keep adding smaller and smaller amounts!

Other Good Riddles

Quick summary of riddle: Zeno of Elea (490-425 BC) is known for creating many paradoxes which were debated by mathematicians for centuries. His riddle involving Achilles, the character from Homer’s Iliad and a tortoise went something like:

The tortoise challenged Achilles to a race and Achilles, full of typical hubris, accepted and even gave the Tortoise a 10 foot head start. Before the race started, the tortoise told Achilles that the reason Achilles would lose is that even though Achilles would be catching up, the tortoise would always be moving ahead. Therefore, Achilles would always be covering a fraction of the distance between the two. Let’s say he covered half of the distance in 1 second (5 feet) and then in the next he covered half of the new distance, the remaining 5 feet plus the Tortoise’s new distance. In the end, the tortoise convinced Achilles that he could not win the race because although he would be getting closer and closer, he would still always be covering smaller and smaller fractions of the total distance between the two. Therefore, Achilles forfeited the race. To read this riddle in a modern narrative form click here .


Try Playing Family Feud in the Classroom: A Fun Inter-Class Game #math


#family feud questions and answers

#

Of course, Family Feud is a well-known game. Play the game in the classroom for a fun twist. It is easy to play and costs nothing but a bit of time. This game is best played when you can involve another classroom. In this way, a class can receive a variety of answers and you can teach cooperation among unrelated groups. You can even use this game as a lesson in diversity as you focus on specific cultural activities or foods. Students may be surprised at what they can learn from each other by playing this simple and fun educational game.

This game can be modified to fit the needs of the classroom in consideration of group size and timing. To describe this game I am going to base it on two classes of fifteen working together. Feel free to modify it as you see fit. Also, this version involves family members. To create the game, both classrooms will need to do the following:

  • Break the students up into two groups. These will be the “families”.
  • Have the students come up with “survey questions”. Organize the questions so that you have a list of twenty questions.
  • Have the students take the questions home and ask 1-2 people in their family answers to the questions. Sample questions are listed later in this article.
  • When the questions come back, have the children group like answers. Tally up the top three to five answers. At this point, each of the twenty questions should have three to five top answers.
  • Trade questions with the other class to use to play the game.

As you can see, this activity is one to be done over a week’s time. Begin on Monday and actually play the game on Friday. To play the game, play it almost as you see it on the television show. Have the groups separate. For each question, ask a different student. He or she must consult with “family” for the answer. Points are tallied based upon the number of answers that were given when surveyed. For example, if answer number one had that answer from thirty parents, then that answer would be worth thirty points.

Here are some sample questions:

  • Name three vegetables kids hate to eat.
  • Name something you make out of flour.
  • Name the most common handheld electronic gadgets
  • Name the top activities that kids do in the summer.
  • Name the most popular TV shows.
  • Name the most dreaded household chores.
  • Name the most popular skateboarding tricks.
  • Name the things used in a garden.
  • Name things that girls do at a slumber party.
  • Name games to be played on the playground.

The questions should be designed to provoke more than one answer. The students can have fun with these questions, and will be using several types of skills to work on this project. Mathematical skills, deductive reasoning and responsibility are a few. This game can also be combined with learning themes for the week or month. For instance, if the theme is gardening, you might want to ask students to focus their questions on plants, gardening supplies or techniques. Remember, Family Feud in the classroom is just another fun learning tool to incorporate into your current lesson plans! Get creative and find new ways to use this game to your educational advantage!


Sample an Online Class: Marist College #marist #college, #online #graduate #programs, #try


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Graduate News

MPA Alumna Appointed First Deputy Superintendent of the NYS Police

New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo recently announced that Patricia M. Groeber has been appointed First Deputy Superintendent of the New York State Police, which places her second in command of the 4,800 member Division.


Mental Health Counseling Alumni Return to Marist

Several alumni from the MA in Mental Health Counseling graduate program recently returned to campus to speak with students in Dr. James Regan’s course, “Counseling the Seriously Mentally Ill”.


Calling All Graduate Students and Alumni!

We’re currently soliciting interview profiles to feature on the College‚Äôs website as well as for use in marketing materials for prospective students.

Curious About Online Learning at Marist?

Sample an online class and learn more!

*In addition to the T3 tour, all accepted and enrolled online students also receive a comprehensive training session from the Marist College Office of Digital Education prior to the start of their online courses.

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Related Information:


Math Riddles: Try to answer these brain teasers and math riddles #crossword


#answers to riddles

#

Math Riddles

Riddle 8

Three Brothers on a Farm

Three brothers live in a farm. They agreed to buy new seeds: Adam and Ben would go and Charlie stayed to protect fields. Ben bought 75 sacks of wheat in the market whereas Adam bought 45 sacks. At home, they split the sacks equally. Charlie had paid 1400 dollars for the wheat. How much dollars did Ben and Adam get of the sum, considering equal split of the sacks?

Every farmer’s part is 1/3(45+75) = 40 sacks.
Charlie paid $1400 for 40 sacks, then 1 sack costs $1400/40 = $35/sack.

Adam got $35*(45-40)=35*5 = $175.
Ben got $35*(75-40)=35*35 = $1225.
Answer: Ben $1225, Adam $175

Riddle 9

The Insurance Salesman

An insurance salesman walk up to house and knocks on the door. A woman answers, and he asks her how many children she has and how old they are. She says I will give you a hint. If you multiply the 3 children’s ages, you get 36. He says this is not enough information. So she gives a him 2 nd hint. If you add up the children’s ages, the sum is the number on the house next door. He goes next door and looks at the house number and says this is still not enough information. So she says she’ll give him one last hint which is that her oldest of the 3 plays piano.

Why would he need to go back to get the last hint after seeing the number on the house next door?

Because the sum of their ages ( the number on the house) is ambiguous and could refer to more than 1 trio of factors.

Answer to Riddle

If you list out the trio of factors that multiply to 36 and their sums, you get.

  • 1 1 36 = 38
  • 1 2 18 = 21
  • 1 3 12 = 16
  • 1 4 9 = 14
  • 6 6 1 = 13
  • 2 2 9 = 13
  • 2 3 6 = 11
  • 3 3 4 = 10

Since the number on the house next door is not enough information there must be more than 1 factor trio that sums up to it, leaving two possibilities: < 6, 6, 1>. <2, 2, 9>. When she says her ‘oldest’ you know it can not be <6,6,1> since she would have two ‘older’ sons not an ‘oldest’.

Riddle 10

This is a famous one. The classic Monty hall riddle!

You are confronted by 3 doors. Behind one of them is a car, behind the two others, you will only see a goat. Now, if you correctly pick the car, you win the car. Otherwise, if you get one of the 2 goats, you don’t get the car.

So, pick any door. It doesn’t matter which one, but we will suppose that you picked door #2, as an example.

Now, after you have picked a door and before finding out what is actually behind it, you are shown a goat behind one of the other doors.(Remember there has to be a goat in 1 of the doors that you have not picked. )

Let’s say you choose door #2, as shown above. For example’s sake, let’s say there’s a goat in door 1. The question and the riddle is. should you switch the door that you picked? In other words, in this example, should you now choose door 3? Or, should you stick with your first choice (door #2)?

There actually is a mathematically correct answer to this riddle: You should indeed change your choice. If you don’t believe me, just try out our free online Monty hall simulation .

Riddle 11

If 9999 = 4, 8888 = 8, 1816 = 6, 1212 = 0, then 1919 =

Look at how many closed areas there are.

  • 9999 has 4 closed areas (the top of the ‘9’)
  • 8888 has 8 closed areas, the top and bottom parts of the 8 and there are no other digits
  • 1816 has 3 closed areas, (top and bottom of 8 and bottom of 6, and it has 2 other digits ( 3*2=6)
  • 1212 has 0 closed areas,(0*4=0)
Riddle 12

An athlete is able to jump FOREVER. However, everytime that she jumps she gets a bit more tired, and every jump goes $$ \frac 1 2 $$ as far as her prior jump. Now, for her very first jump, she goes $$ \frac 1 2 $$ of a foot.

On her second jump, she goes $$ \frac 1 4 $$ of a foot, and so on and so forth. The beginning of her journey is shown in the gif below.

How many jumps does it take for her to travel 1 foot?

She will never get to the 1 foot mark because you keep adding smaller and smaller amounts!

Other Good Riddles

Quick summary of riddle: Zeno of Elea (490-425 BC) is known for creating many paradoxes which were debated by mathematicians for centuries. His riddle involving Achilles, the character from Homer’s Iliad and a tortoise went something like:

The tortoise challenged Achilles to a race and Achilles, full of typical hubris, accepted and even gave the Tortoise a 10 foot head start. Before the race started, the tortoise told Achilles that the reason Achilles would lose is that even though Achilles would be catching up, the tortoise would always be moving ahead. Therefore, Achilles would always be covering a fraction of the distance between the two. Let’s say he covered half of the distance in 1 second (5 feet) and then in the next he covered half of the new distance, the remaining 5 feet plus the Tortoise’s new distance. In the end, the tortoise convinced Achilles that he could not win the race because although he would be getting closer and closer, he would still always be covering smaller and smaller fractions of the total distance between the two. Therefore, Achilles forfeited the race. To read this riddle in a modern narrative form click here .


Try Playing Family Feud in the Classroom: A Fun Inter-Class Game #answer


#family feud questions and answers

#

Of course, Family Feud is a well-known game. Play the game in the classroom for a fun twist. It is easy to play and costs nothing but a bit of time. This game is best played when you can involve another classroom. In this way, a class can receive a variety of answers and you can teach cooperation among unrelated groups. You can even use this game as a lesson in diversity as you focus on specific cultural activities or foods. Students may be surprised at what they can learn from each other by playing this simple and fun educational game.

This game can be modified to fit the needs of the classroom in consideration of group size and timing. To describe this game I am going to base it on two classes of fifteen working together. Feel free to modify it as you see fit. Also, this version involves family members. To create the game, both classrooms will need to do the following:

  • Break the students up into two groups. These will be the “families”.
  • Have the students come up with “survey questions”. Organize the questions so that you have a list of twenty questions.
  • Have the students take the questions home and ask 1-2 people in their family answers to the questions. Sample questions are listed later in this article.
  • When the questions come back, have the children group like answers. Tally up the top three to five answers. At this point, each of the twenty questions should have three to five top answers.
  • Trade questions with the other class to use to play the game.

As you can see, this activity is one to be done over a week’s time. Begin on Monday and actually play the game on Friday. To play the game, play it almost as you see it on the television show. Have the groups separate. For each question, ask a different student. He or she must consult with “family” for the answer. Points are tallied based upon the number of answers that were given when surveyed. For example, if answer number one had that answer from thirty parents, then that answer would be worth thirty points.

Here are some sample questions:

  • Name three vegetables kids hate to eat.
  • Name something you make out of flour.
  • Name the most common handheld electronic gadgets
  • Name the top activities that kids do in the summer.
  • Name the most popular TV shows.
  • Name the most dreaded household chores.
  • Name the most popular skateboarding tricks.
  • Name the things used in a garden.
  • Name things that girls do at a slumber party.
  • Name games to be played on the playground.

The questions should be designed to provoke more than one answer. The students can have fun with these questions, and will be using several types of skills to work on this project. Mathematical skills, deductive reasoning and responsibility are a few. This game can also be combined with learning themes for the week or month. For instance, if the theme is gardening, you might want to ask students to focus their questions on plants, gardening supplies or techniques. Remember, Family Feud in the classroom is just another fun learning tool to incorporate into your current lesson plans! Get creative and find new ways to use this game to your educational advantage!


Math Riddles: Try to answer these brain teasers and math riddles #answer


#answers to riddles

#

Math Riddles

Riddle 8

Three Brothers on a Farm

Three brothers live in a farm. They agreed to buy new seeds: Adam and Ben would go and Charlie stayed to protect fields. Ben bought 75 sacks of wheat in the market whereas Adam bought 45 sacks. At home, they split the sacks equally. Charlie had paid 1400 dollars for the wheat. How much dollars did Ben and Adam get of the sum, considering equal split of the sacks?

Every farmer’s part is 1/3(45+75) = 40 sacks.
Charlie paid $1400 for 40 sacks, then 1 sack costs $1400/40 = $35/sack.

Adam got $35*(45-40)=35*5 = $175.
Ben got $35*(75-40)=35*35 = $1225.
Answer: Ben $1225, Adam $175

Riddle 9

The Insurance Salesman

An insurance salesman walk up to house and knocks on the door. A woman answers, and he asks her how many children she has and how old they are. She says I will give you a hint. If you multiply the 3 children’s ages, you get 36. He says this is not enough information. So she gives a him 2 nd hint. If you add up the children’s ages, the sum is the number on the house next door. He goes next door and looks at the house number and says this is still not enough information. So she says she’ll give him one last hint which is that her oldest of the 3 plays piano.

Why would he need to go back to get the last hint after seeing the number on the house next door?

Because the sum of their ages ( the number on the house) is ambiguous and could refer to more than 1 trio of factors.

Answer to Riddle

If you list out the trio of factors that multiply to 36 and their sums, you get.

  • 1 1 36 = 38
  • 1 2 18 = 21
  • 1 3 12 = 16
  • 1 4 9 = 14
  • 6 6 1 = 13
  • 2 2 9 = 13
  • 2 3 6 = 11
  • 3 3 4 = 10

Since the number on the house next door is not enough information there must be more than 1 factor trio that sums up to it, leaving two possibilities: < 6, 6, 1>. <2, 2, 9>. When she says her ‘oldest’ you know it can not be <6,6,1> since she would have two ‘older’ sons not an ‘oldest’.

Riddle 10

This is a famous one. The classic Monty hall riddle!

You are confronted by 3 doors. Behind one of them is a car, behind the two others, you will only see a goat. Now, if you correctly pick the car, you win the car. Otherwise, if you get one of the 2 goats, you don’t get the car.

So, pick any door. It doesn’t matter which one, but we will suppose that you picked door #2, as an example.

Now, after you have picked a door and before finding out what is actually behind it, you are shown a goat behind one of the other doors.(Remember there has to be a goat in 1 of the doors that you have not picked. )

Let’s say you choose door #2, as shown above. For example’s sake, let’s say there’s a goat in door 1. The question and the riddle is. should you switch the door that you picked? In other words, in this example, should you now choose door 3? Or, should you stick with your first choice (door #2)?

There actually is a mathematically correct answer to this riddle: You should indeed change your choice. If you don’t believe me, just try out our free online Monty hall simulation .

Riddle 11

If 9999 = 4, 8888 = 8, 1816 = 6, 1212 = 0, then 1919 =

Look at how many closed areas there are.

  • 9999 has 4 closed areas (the top of the ‘9’)
  • 8888 has 8 closed areas, the top and bottom parts of the 8 and there are no other digits
  • 1816 has 3 closed areas, (top and bottom of 8 and bottom of 6, and it has 2 other digits ( 3*2=6)
  • 1212 has 0 closed areas,(0*4=0)
Riddle 12

An athlete is able to jump FOREVER. However, everytime that she jumps she gets a bit more tired, and every jump goes $$ \frac 1 2 $$ as far as her prior jump. Now, for her very first jump, she goes $$ \frac 1 2 $$ of a foot.

On her second jump, she goes $$ \frac 1 4 $$ of a foot, and so on and so forth. The beginning of her journey is shown in the gif below.

How many jumps does it take for her to travel 1 foot?

She will never get to the 1 foot mark because you keep adding smaller and smaller amounts!

Other Good Riddles

Quick summary of riddle: Zeno of Elea (490-425 BC) is known for creating many paradoxes which were debated by mathematicians for centuries. His riddle involving Achilles, the character from Homer’s Iliad and a tortoise went something like:

The tortoise challenged Achilles to a race and Achilles, full of typical hubris, accepted and even gave the Tortoise a 10 foot head start. Before the race started, the tortoise told Achilles that the reason Achilles would lose is that even though Achilles would be catching up, the tortoise would always be moving ahead. Therefore, Achilles would always be covering a fraction of the distance between the two. Let’s say he covered half of the distance in 1 second (5 feet) and then in the next he covered half of the new distance, the remaining 5 feet plus the Tortoise’s new distance. In the end, the tortoise convinced Achilles that he could not win the race because although he would be getting closer and closer, he would still always be covering smaller and smaller fractions of the total distance between the two. Therefore, Achilles forfeited the race. To read this riddle in a modern narrative form click here .


Try Playing Family Feud in the Classroom: A Fun Inter-Class Game #definition


#family feud questions and answers

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Of course, Family Feud is a well-known game. Play the game in the classroom for a fun twist. It is easy to play and costs nothing but a bit of time. This game is best played when you can involve another classroom. In this way, a class can receive a variety of answers and you can teach cooperation among unrelated groups. You can even use this game as a lesson in diversity as you focus on specific cultural activities or foods. Students may be surprised at what they can learn from each other by playing this simple and fun educational game.

This game can be modified to fit the needs of the classroom in consideration of group size and timing. To describe this game I am going to base it on two classes of fifteen working together. Feel free to modify it as you see fit. Also, this version involves family members. To create the game, both classrooms will need to do the following:

  • Break the students up into two groups. These will be the “families”.
  • Have the students come up with “survey questions”. Organize the questions so that you have a list of twenty questions.
  • Have the students take the questions home and ask 1-2 people in their family answers to the questions. Sample questions are listed later in this article.
  • When the questions come back, have the children group like answers. Tally up the top three to five answers. At this point, each of the twenty questions should have three to five top answers.
  • Trade questions with the other class to use to play the game.

As you can see, this activity is one to be done over a week’s time. Begin on Monday and actually play the game on Friday. To play the game, play it almost as you see it on the television show. Have the groups separate. For each question, ask a different student. He or she must consult with “family” for the answer. Points are tallied based upon the number of answers that were given when surveyed. For example, if answer number one had that answer from thirty parents, then that answer would be worth thirty points.

Here are some sample questions:

  • Name three vegetables kids hate to eat.
  • Name something you make out of flour.
  • Name the most common handheld electronic gadgets
  • Name the top activities that kids do in the summer.
  • Name the most popular TV shows.
  • Name the most dreaded household chores.
  • Name the most popular skateboarding tricks.
  • Name the things used in a garden.
  • Name things that girls do at a slumber party.
  • Name games to be played on the playground.

The questions should be designed to provoke more than one answer. The students can have fun with these questions, and will be using several types of skills to work on this project. Mathematical skills, deductive reasoning and responsibility are a few. This game can also be combined with learning themes for the week or month. For instance, if the theme is gardening, you might want to ask students to focus their questions on plants, gardening supplies or techniques. Remember, Family Feud in the classroom is just another fun learning tool to incorporate into your current lesson plans! Get creative and find new ways to use this game to your educational advantage!


Math Riddles: Try to answer these brain teasers and math riddles #science


#answers to riddles

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Math Riddles

Riddle 8

Three Brothers on a Farm

Three brothers live in a farm. They agreed to buy new seeds: Adam and Ben would go and Charlie stayed to protect fields. Ben bought 75 sacks of wheat in the market whereas Adam bought 45 sacks. At home, they split the sacks equally. Charlie had paid 1400 dollars for the wheat. How much dollars did Ben and Adam get of the sum, considering equal split of the sacks?

Every farmer’s part is 1/3(45+75) = 40 sacks.
Charlie paid $1400 for 40 sacks, then 1 sack costs $1400/40 = $35/sack.

Adam got $35*(45-40)=35*5 = $175.
Ben got $35*(75-40)=35*35 = $1225.
Answer: Ben $1225, Adam $175

Riddle 9

The Insurance Salesman

An insurance salesman walk up to house and knocks on the door. A woman answers, and he asks her how many children she has and how old they are. She says I will give you a hint. If you multiply the 3 children’s ages, you get 36. He says this is not enough information. So she gives a him 2 nd hint. If you add up the children’s ages, the sum is the number on the house next door. He goes next door and looks at the house number and says this is still not enough information. So she says she’ll give him one last hint which is that her oldest of the 3 plays piano.

Why would he need to go back to get the last hint after seeing the number on the house next door?

Because the sum of their ages ( the number on the house) is ambiguous and could refer to more than 1 trio of factors.

Answer to Riddle

If you list out the trio of factors that multiply to 36 and their sums, you get.

  • 1 1 36 = 38
  • 1 2 18 = 21
  • 1 3 12 = 16
  • 1 4 9 = 14
  • 6 6 1 = 13
  • 2 2 9 = 13
  • 2 3 6 = 11
  • 3 3 4 = 10

Since the number on the house next door is not enough information there must be more than 1 factor trio that sums up to it, leaving two possibilities: < 6, 6, 1>. <2, 2, 9>. When she says her ‘oldest’ you know it can not be <6,6,1> since she would have two ‘older’ sons not an ‘oldest’.

Riddle 10

This is a famous one. The classic Monty hall riddle!

You are confronted by 3 doors. Behind one of them is a car, behind the two others, you will only see a goat. Now, if you correctly pick the car, you win the car. Otherwise, if you get one of the 2 goats, you don’t get the car.

So, pick any door. It doesn’t matter which one, but we will suppose that you picked door #2, as an example.

Now, after you have picked a door and before finding out what is actually behind it, you are shown a goat behind one of the other doors.(Remember there has to be a goat in 1 of the doors that you have not picked. )

Let’s say you choose door #2, as shown above. For example’s sake, let’s say there’s a goat in door 1. The question and the riddle is. should you switch the door that you picked? In other words, in this example, should you now choose door 3? Or, should you stick with your first choice (door #2)?

There actually is a mathematically correct answer to this riddle: You should indeed change your choice. If you don’t believe me, just try out our free online Monty hall simulation .

Riddle 11

If 9999 = 4, 8888 = 8, 1816 = 6, 1212 = 0, then 1919 =

Look at how many closed areas there are.

  • 9999 has 4 closed areas (the top of the ‘9’)
  • 8888 has 8 closed areas, the top and bottom parts of the 8 and there are no other digits
  • 1816 has 3 closed areas, (top and bottom of 8 and bottom of 6, and it has 2 other digits ( 3*2=6)
  • 1212 has 0 closed areas,(0*4=0)
Riddle 12

An athlete is able to jump FOREVER. However, everytime that she jumps she gets a bit more tired, and every jump goes $$ \frac 1 2 $$ as far as her prior jump. Now, for her very first jump, she goes $$ \frac 1 2 $$ of a foot.

On her second jump, she goes $$ \frac 1 4 $$ of a foot, and so on and so forth. The beginning of her journey is shown in the gif below.

How many jumps does it take for her to travel 1 foot?

She will never get to the 1 foot mark because you keep adding smaller and smaller amounts!

Other Good Riddles

Quick summary of riddle: Zeno of Elea (490-425 BC) is known for creating many paradoxes which were debated by mathematicians for centuries. His riddle involving Achilles, the character from Homer’s Iliad and a tortoise went something like:

The tortoise challenged Achilles to a race and Achilles, full of typical hubris, accepted and even gave the Tortoise a 10 foot head start. Before the race started, the tortoise told Achilles that the reason Achilles would lose is that even though Achilles would be catching up, the tortoise would always be moving ahead. Therefore, Achilles would always be covering a fraction of the distance between the two. Let’s say he covered half of the distance in 1 second (5 feet) and then in the next he covered half of the new distance, the remaining 5 feet plus the Tortoise’s new distance. In the end, the tortoise convinced Achilles that he could not win the race because although he would be getting closer and closer, he would still always be covering smaller and smaller fractions of the total distance between the two. Therefore, Achilles forfeited the race. To read this riddle in a modern narrative form click here .