Survey Questions 101: Do You Make any of These 7 Question Writing


#questions and answer

#

Survey Questions 101: Do You Make any of These 7 Question Writing Mistakes?

Details, details, details. Creating surveys that yield actionable insights is about details. And writing effective questions is the first step.

We see common mistakes that keep survey questions from being effective all the time.

Here are the 7 most common:

Survey Question Mistake #1: Failing to Avoid Leading Words / Questions

Subtle wording differences can produce great differences in results. “Could,” “should,” and “might” all sound about the same, but may produce a 20% difference in agreement to a question.

In additions, strong words such as “force” and “prohibit” represent control or action and can bias your results.

The government should force you to pay higher taxes.

No one likes to be forced, and no one likes higher taxes. This agreement scale question makes it sound doubly bad to raise taxes.

Wording alternatives can be developed. How about simple statements such as: The government should increase taxes, or the government needs to increase taxes.

How would you rate the career of legendary outfielder Joe Dimaggio?

This question tells you Joe Dimaggio is a legendary outfielder. This type of wording can bias respondents.

How about replacing the word “legendary” with “baseball” as in: How would you rate the career of baseball outfielder Joe Dimaggio?

Survey Question Mistake #2: Failing to Give Mutually Exclusive Choices

Multiple choice response options should be mutually exclusive so that respondents can make clear choices. Don’t create ambiguity for respondents.

Review your survey and identify ways respondents could get stuck with either too many or no correct answers.

What is your age?

What answer would you select if you were 10, 20, or 30? Questions like this will frustrate a respondent and invalidate your results.

What type of vehicle do you own?

This question has the same problem. What if the respondent owns a truck, hybrid, convertible, cross-over, motorcycle, or no vehicle at all?

Survey Question Mistake #3: Not Asking Direct Questions

Questions that are vague and do not communicate your intent can limit the usefulness of your results. Make sure respondents know what you’re asking.

What suggestions do you have for improving Tom’s Tomato Juice?

This question may be intended to obtain suggestions about improving taste, but respondents will offer suggestions about texture, the type of can or bottle, about mixing juices, or even suggestions relating to using tomato juice as a mixer or in recipes.

What do you like to do for fun?

Finding out that respondents like to play Scrabble isn’t what the researcher is looking for, but it may be the response received. It is unclear that the researcher is asking about movies vs. other forms of paid entertainment. A respondent could take this question in many directions.

Survey Question Mistake #4: Forgetting to Add a “Prefer Not to Answer” Option

Sometimes respondents may not want or be able to provide the information requested.

Questions about income, occupation, finances, family life, personal hygiene, and personal, political, or religious beliefs can be too intrusive and be rejected by the respondent.

Privacy is an important issue to most people. Incentives and assurances of confidentiality can make it easier to obtain private information.

While current research does not support that PNA (Prefer Not to Answer) options increase data quality or response rates, many respondents appreciate this non-disclosure option.

Furthermore, different cultural groups may respond differently. One recent study found that while U.S. respondents skip sensitive questions, Asian respondents often discontinue the survey entirely.

What is your race?

What is your age?

Did you vote in the last election?

What are your religious beliefs?

What are your political beliefs?

What is your annual household income?

These questions should be asked only when absolutely necessary. In addition, they should always include an option to not answer. (e.g. “Prefer Not to Answer”).

Survey Question Mistake #5: Failing to Cover All Possible Answer Choices

Do you have all of the options covered? If you are unsure, conduct a pretest using “Other (please specify)” as an option.

If more than 10% of respondents (in a pretest or otherwise) select “other,” you are probably missing an answer. Review the “Other” text your test respondents have provided and add the most frequently mentioned new options to the list.

You indicated that you eat at Joe s fast food once every 3 months. Why don t you eat at Joe s more often?

There isn t a location near my house

I don t like the taste of the food

Never heard of it

This question doesn’t include other options, such as healthiness of the food, price/value or some “other” reason. Over 10% of respondents would probably have a problem answering this question.

Survey Question Mistake #6: Not Using Unbalanced Scales Carefully

Unbalanced scales may be appropriate for some situations and promote bias in others.

For instance, a hospital might use an Excellent Very Good Good Fair scale where “Fair” is the lowest customer satisfaction point because they believe “Fair” is absolutely unacceptable and requires correction.

The key is to correctly interpret the scale. If “Fair” is the lowest point on a scale, then a result slightly better than fair is probably not a good one.

Additionally, scale points should represent equi-distant points on a scale. That is, they should have the same equal conceptual distance from one point to the next.

For example, researchers have shown the points to be nearly equi-distant on the strongly disagree–disagree–neutral–agree–strongly agree scale.

Set your bottom point as the worst possible situation and top point as the best possible, then evenly spread the labels for your scale points in-between.

What is your opinion of Crazy Justin s auto-repair?

This question puts the center of the scale at fantastic, and the lowest possible rating as “Pretty Good.” This question is not capable of collecting true opinions of respondents.

Survey Question Mistake #7: Not Asking Only One Question at a Time

There is often a temptation to ask multiple questions at once. This can cause problems for respondents and influence their responses.

Review each question and make sure it asks only one clear question.

What is the fastest and most economical Internet service for you?

This is really asking two questions. The fastest is often not the most economical.

How likely are you to go out for dinner and a movie this weekend?

Even though “dinner and a movie” is a common term, this is two questions as well. It is best to separate activities into different questions or give respondents these options:

Dinner and Movie

Summary

While not totally inclusive, these seven tips are common offenders in building quality questions.

Focus on creating clear questions and having an understandable, appropriate, and complete set of answer choices. Great questions and great answer choices lead to great research success.

What are some mistakes you ve made that you wish you wouldn t have? Comment below and let s discuss!


Online Survey Questions and Answer Types – QuestionPro Articles #answer #riding #gear


#question and answer

#

Online Survey Design and Answer Type

So you’ve decided that you need a better understanding of the characteristics of people who visit your website, or of some other business-related question. Developing a focused and effective questionnaire will help you to efficiently and accurately pinpoint the information that will help you make more informed decisions.

Developing a questionnaire is as much an art as it is a science. And just as an artist has a variety of different colors to choose from in the palette, you have a variety of different question formats with which to question an accurate picture of your customers, clients and issues that are important to them.

The Dichotomous Question
The dichotomous question is generally a “yes/no” question. An example of the dichotomous question is:

Have you ever purchased a product or service from our website?

If you want information only about product users, you may want to ask this type of question to “screen out” those who haven’t purchased your products or services. Researchers use “screening ” questions to make sure that only those people they are interested in participate in the survey.

You may also want to use yes/no questions to separate people or branch into groups of those who “have purchased” and those who “have not yet purchased” your products or services. Once separated, different questions can be asked of each of these groups.

You may want to ask the “have purchased” group how satisfied they are with your products and services, and you may want to ask the “have not purchased” group what the primary reasons are for not purchasing. In essence, your questionnaire branches to become two different sets of questions.

The Multiple Choice Questions
The multiple-choice question consists of three or more exhaustive, mutually exclusive categories. Multiple choice questions can ask for single or multiple answers. In the following example, we could ask the respondent to select exactly one answer from the 7 possible, exactly 3 of the 7, or as many of the 7 (1, 2, or 3 answers can be selected).

Example: multiple-choice question to find out how a person first heard about your website is:

How did you first hear about our web site?

  • Television
  • Radio
  • Newspaper
  • Magazine
  • Word-of-mouth
  • Internet
  • Other: Please Specify _______________

For this type of question it is important to consider including an “other” category because there may be other avenues by which the person first heard about your site that you might have overlooked.

Rank Order Scaling
Rank order scaling questions allow a certain set of brands or products to be ranked based upon a specific attribute or characteristic. Perhaps we know that Toyota, Honda, Mazda, and Ford are most likely to be purchased. You may request that the options be ranked based upon a particular attribute. Ties may or may not be allowed. If you allow ties, several options will have the same scores.

Example:
Based upon what you have seen, heard, and experienced, please rank the following brands according to their reliability. Place a “1” next to the brand that is most reliable, a “2” next to the brand that is next most reliable, and so on. Remember, no two cars can have the same ranking.

Honda__
Toyota__
Mazda__
Ford__

The Rating Scale
A rating scale question requires a person to rate a product or brand along a well-defined, evenly spaced continuum. Rating scales are often used to measure the direction and intensity of attitudes. The following is an example of a comparative rating scale question:

Which of the following categories best describes your last experience purchasing a product or service on our website? Would you say that your experience was:

  • Very pleasant
  • Somewhat pleasant
  • Neither pleasant nor unpleasant
  • Somewhat unpleasant
  • Very unpleasant

The Semantic Differential Scale
The semantic differential scale asks a person to rate a product, brand, or company based upon a seven-point rating scale that has two bi-polar adjectives at each end. The following is an example of a semantic differential scale question.

Notice that unlike the rating scale, the semantic differential scale does not have a neutral or middle selection. A person must choose, to a certain extent, one or the other adjective.


The Stapel Scale
The staple scale asks a person to rate a brand, product, or service according to a certain characteristic on a scale from +5 to -5, indicating how well the characteristic describes the product or service. The following is an example of a staple scale question:

When thinking about Data Mining Technologies, Inc. (DMT), do you believe that the word “innovative” aptly describes or poorly describes the company? On a scale of +5 to -5 with +5 being “very good description of DMT” and -5 being “poor description of DMT,” how do you rank DMT according to the word “innovative”?

The Constant Sum Question
A constant sum question permits collection of “ratio” data, meaning that the data is able to express the relative value or importance of the options (option A is twice as important as option B)

Example:
The following question asks you to divide 100 points between a set of options to show the value or importance you place on each option. Distribute the 100 points giving the more important reasons a greater number of points. The computer will prompt you if your total does not equal exactly 100 points.

When thinking about the reasons you purchased our TargetFind data mining software, please rate the following reasons according to their relative importance.

Seamless integration with other software __________
User friendliness of software __________
Ability to manipulate algorithms __________
Level of pre- and post-purchase service __________
Level of value for the price __________
Convenience of purchase/quick delivery __________

This type of question is used when you are relatively sure of the reasons for purchase, or you want input on a limited number of reasons you feel are important. Questions must sum to 100 points and point totals are checked by javascript.

The Open-Ended Question
The open-ended question seeks to explore the qualitative, in-depth aspects of a particular topic or issue. It gives a person the chance to respond in detail. Although open-ended questions are important, they are time-consuming and should not be over-used. An example of an open-ended question might be:

(If the respondent indicates they did not find what they were looking for. )

What products of services were you looking for that were not found on our website?

If you want to add an “Other” answer to a multiple choice question, you would use branching instructions to come to an open ended question to find out What Other.

The Demographic Question
Demographic questions are an integral part of any questionnaire. They are used to identify characteristics such as age, gender, income, race, geographic place of residence, number of children, and so forth. For example demographic questions will help you to classify the difference between product users and non-users. Perhaps most of your customers come from the Northeast, are between the ages of 50 and 65, and have incomes between $50,000 and $75,000.

Demographic data helps you paint a more accurate picture of the group of persons you are trying to understand. And by better understanding the type of people who use or are likely to use your product, you can allocate promotional resources to reach these people, in a more cost effective manner.

Psycho-graphic or life style questions are also included in the template files. These questions provide an in-depth psychological profile and look at activities, interests and opinions of respondents.


Making Survey Questions Required #science #answers


#i have a question and need an answer

#

Making Survey Questions Required

You can make any question in your survey required so that respondents must answer it before submitting the page. By default, required questions are marked by an asterisk (*), but you can choose to hide the asterisks from the OPTIONS section of the sidebar in the Design Survey section of your survey.

If respondents don t answer a required question, they will not be able to advance to the next page until they answer the question within the requirements. You can customize the error message that they see if they leave a required question blank, or if their answer doesn t meet the required range or limit.

When you analyze your results, you may notice that some respondents skipped required questions. This could mean that skip logic skipped them past the question, or that the respondent exited early.

Requiring an Answer to a Question

To require an answer to a question:

  1. Click the Design Survey tab.
  2. Click a question to edit it.
  3. Click the Options tab.
  4. Select Require an Answer to This Question .
  5. Customize the error message and set a required range or limit (optional).
  6. Click Save .

Requiring Questions in Bulk

You can require all the questions on a page at once, instead of changing the setting on each question one by one.

To require an answer to all questions on a page:

  1. In the Design Survey section, click More Actions at the top of the page whose questions you want to require.
  2. Click Require questions .

There s no way to undo this bulk action, but you can uncheck Require an Answer to This Question under the Options tab for individual questions if needed.

If you need to require a specific range or limit, or customize the error messages, you need to adjust these settings for each individual question.

Requiring a Specific Range or Limit

On question types that allow multiple answer choices, rows, or textboxes, you can set a range or a limit on how many the respondent must answer. The following requirements are available:

Then you can enter the number of answer choices you want to require the respondent to answer.

TIP! Customize the Error Message. If you set a specific range or limit on the number of required answer choices, customize the error message to be specific about these requirements. This will ensure that the respondents know what they did wrong so that they can successfully advance through the survey.

You can make any question in your survey required so that respondents must answer it before submitting the page. By default, required questions are marked by an asterisk (*), but you can choose to hide the asterisks from the OPTIONS section of the sidebar in the Design Survey section of your survey.

Get Answers Today

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Online survey software tool #interview #questions #and #answers


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Create Surveys

Quickly create online surveys and polls with our intuitive web based software tool. You can create your own survey, copy a professionally written survey template, or upload your survey directly from a Word file. With over 30 question types and dozens of color themes, QuestionPro makes it easy to create great looking questionnaires and surveys.

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Reach your customers wherever they are using our survey tools: email system, embedding in your website, creating pop-up and exit surveys, or posting to social networks like Facebook, Twitter, or Google+. QuestionPro surveys look great on mobile devices or tablets, and you can even collect responses offline using our iOS and Android mobile survey app.

Analyze Results

We make analysis easy with a full set of reporting features such as real-time summary, pivot tables, segmentation tools, trend analysis, and text analytics. You can also export your survey data directly to Excel, SPSS, or CSV. We make it easy to share results with formatted Word and PowerPoint reports or by generating great looking infographics.

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Survey Questions 101: Do You Make any of These 7 Question Writing


#questions and answer

#

Survey Questions 101: Do You Make any of These 7 Question Writing Mistakes?

Details, details, details. Creating surveys that yield actionable insights is about details. And writing effective questions is the first step.

We see common mistakes that keep survey questions from being effective all the time.

Here are the 7 most common:

Survey Question Mistake #1: Failing to Avoid Leading Words / Questions

Subtle wording differences can produce great differences in results. “Could,” “should,” and “might” all sound about the same, but may produce a 20% difference in agreement to a question.

In additions, strong words such as “force” and “prohibit” represent control or action and can bias your results.

The government should force you to pay higher taxes.

No one likes to be forced, and no one likes higher taxes. This agreement scale question makes it sound doubly bad to raise taxes.

Wording alternatives can be developed. How about simple statements such as: The government should increase taxes, or the government needs to increase taxes.

How would you rate the career of legendary outfielder Joe Dimaggio?

This question tells you Joe Dimaggio is a legendary outfielder. This type of wording can bias respondents.

How about replacing the word “legendary” with “baseball” as in: How would you rate the career of baseball outfielder Joe Dimaggio?

Survey Question Mistake #2: Failing to Give Mutually Exclusive Choices

Multiple choice response options should be mutually exclusive so that respondents can make clear choices. Don’t create ambiguity for respondents.

Review your survey and identify ways respondents could get stuck with either too many or no correct answers.

What is your age?

What answer would you select if you were 10, 20, or 30? Questions like this will frustrate a respondent and invalidate your results.

What type of vehicle do you own?

This question has the same problem. What if the respondent owns a truck, hybrid, convertible, cross-over, motorcycle, or no vehicle at all?

Survey Question Mistake #3: Not Asking Direct Questions

Questions that are vague and do not communicate your intent can limit the usefulness of your results. Make sure respondents know what you’re asking.

What suggestions do you have for improving Tom’s Tomato Juice?

This question may be intended to obtain suggestions about improving taste, but respondents will offer suggestions about texture, the type of can or bottle, about mixing juices, or even suggestions relating to using tomato juice as a mixer or in recipes.

What do you like to do for fun?

Finding out that respondents like to play Scrabble isn’t what the researcher is looking for, but it may be the response received. It is unclear that the researcher is asking about movies vs. other forms of paid entertainment. A respondent could take this question in many directions.

Survey Question Mistake #4: Forgetting to Add a “Prefer Not to Answer” Option

Sometimes respondents may not want or be able to provide the information requested.

Questions about income, occupation, finances, family life, personal hygiene, and personal, political, or religious beliefs can be too intrusive and be rejected by the respondent.

Privacy is an important issue to most people. Incentives and assurances of confidentiality can make it easier to obtain private information.

While current research does not support that PNA (Prefer Not to Answer) options increase data quality or response rates, many respondents appreciate this non-disclosure option.

Furthermore, different cultural groups may respond differently. One recent study found that while U.S. respondents skip sensitive questions, Asian respondents often discontinue the survey entirely.

What is your race?

What is your age?

Did you vote in the last election?

What are your religious beliefs?

What are your political beliefs?

What is your annual household income?

These questions should be asked only when absolutely necessary. In addition, they should always include an option to not answer. (e.g. “Prefer Not to Answer”).

Survey Question Mistake #5: Failing to Cover All Possible Answer Choices

Do you have all of the options covered? If you are unsure, conduct a pretest using “Other (please specify)” as an option.

If more than 10% of respondents (in a pretest or otherwise) select “other,” you are probably missing an answer. Review the “Other” text your test respondents have provided and add the most frequently mentioned new options to the list.

You indicated that you eat at Joe s fast food once every 3 months. Why don t you eat at Joe s more often?

There isn t a location near my house

I don t like the taste of the food

Never heard of it

This question doesn’t include other options, such as healthiness of the food, price/value or some “other” reason. Over 10% of respondents would probably have a problem answering this question.

Survey Question Mistake #6: Not Using Unbalanced Scales Carefully

Unbalanced scales may be appropriate for some situations and promote bias in others.

For instance, a hospital might use an Excellent Very Good Good Fair scale where “Fair” is the lowest customer satisfaction point because they believe “Fair” is absolutely unacceptable and requires correction.

The key is to correctly interpret the scale. If “Fair” is the lowest point on a scale, then a result slightly better than fair is probably not a good one.

Additionally, scale points should represent equi-distant points on a scale. That is, they should have the same equal conceptual distance from one point to the next.

For example, researchers have shown the points to be nearly equi-distant on the strongly disagree–disagree–neutral–agree–strongly agree scale.

Set your bottom point as the worst possible situation and top point as the best possible, then evenly spread the labels for your scale points in-between.

What is your opinion of Crazy Justin s auto-repair?

This question puts the center of the scale at fantastic, and the lowest possible rating as “Pretty Good.” This question is not capable of collecting true opinions of respondents.

Survey Question Mistake #7: Not Asking Only One Question at a Time

There is often a temptation to ask multiple questions at once. This can cause problems for respondents and influence their responses.

Review each question and make sure it asks only one clear question.

What is the fastest and most economical Internet service for you?

This is really asking two questions. The fastest is often not the most economical.

How likely are you to go out for dinner and a movie this weekend?

Even though “dinner and a movie” is a common term, this is two questions as well. It is best to separate activities into different questions or give respondents these options:

Dinner and Movie

Summary

While not totally inclusive, these seven tips are common offenders in building quality questions.

Focus on creating clear questions and having an understandable, appropriate, and complete set of answer choices. Great questions and great answer choices lead to great research success.

What are some mistakes you ve made that you wish you wouldn t have? Comment below and let s discuss!


Online Survey Questions and Answer Types – QuestionPro Articles #question #answer


#question and answer

#

Online Survey Design and Answer Type

So you’ve decided that you need a better understanding of the characteristics of people who visit your website, or of some other business-related question. Developing a focused and effective questionnaire will help you to efficiently and accurately pinpoint the information that will help you make more informed decisions.

Developing a questionnaire is as much an art as it is a science. And just as an artist has a variety of different colors to choose from in the palette, you have a variety of different question formats with which to question an accurate picture of your customers, clients and issues that are important to them.

The Dichotomous Question
The dichotomous question is generally a “yes/no” question. An example of the dichotomous question is:

Have you ever purchased a product or service from our website?

If you want information only about product users, you may want to ask this type of question to “screen out” those who haven’t purchased your products or services. Researchers use “screening ” questions to make sure that only those people they are interested in participate in the survey.

You may also want to use yes/no questions to separate people or branch into groups of those who “have purchased” and those who “have not yet purchased” your products or services. Once separated, different questions can be asked of each of these groups.

You may want to ask the “have purchased” group how satisfied they are with your products and services, and you may want to ask the “have not purchased” group what the primary reasons are for not purchasing. In essence, your questionnaire branches to become two different sets of questions.

The Multiple Choice Questions
The multiple-choice question consists of three or more exhaustive, mutually exclusive categories. Multiple choice questions can ask for single or multiple answers. In the following example, we could ask the respondent to select exactly one answer from the 7 possible, exactly 3 of the 7, or as many of the 7 (1, 2, or 3 answers can be selected).

Example: multiple-choice question to find out how a person first heard about your website is:

How did you first hear about our web site?

  • Television
  • Radio
  • Newspaper
  • Magazine
  • Word-of-mouth
  • Internet
  • Other: Please Specify _______________

For this type of question it is important to consider including an “other” category because there may be other avenues by which the person first heard about your site that you might have overlooked.

Rank Order Scaling
Rank order scaling questions allow a certain set of brands or products to be ranked based upon a specific attribute or characteristic. Perhaps we know that Toyota, Honda, Mazda, and Ford are most likely to be purchased. You may request that the options be ranked based upon a particular attribute. Ties may or may not be allowed. If you allow ties, several options will have the same scores.

Example:
Based upon what you have seen, heard, and experienced, please rank the following brands according to their reliability. Place a “1” next to the brand that is most reliable, a “2” next to the brand that is next most reliable, and so on. Remember, no two cars can have the same ranking.

Honda__
Toyota__
Mazda__
Ford__

The Rating Scale
A rating scale question requires a person to rate a product or brand along a well-defined, evenly spaced continuum. Rating scales are often used to measure the direction and intensity of attitudes. The following is an example of a comparative rating scale question:

Which of the following categories best describes your last experience purchasing a product or service on our website? Would you say that your experience was:

  • Very pleasant
  • Somewhat pleasant
  • Neither pleasant nor unpleasant
  • Somewhat unpleasant
  • Very unpleasant

The Semantic Differential Scale
The semantic differential scale asks a person to rate a product, brand, or company based upon a seven-point rating scale that has two bi-polar adjectives at each end. The following is an example of a semantic differential scale question.

Notice that unlike the rating scale, the semantic differential scale does not have a neutral or middle selection. A person must choose, to a certain extent, one or the other adjective.


The Stapel Scale
The staple scale asks a person to rate a brand, product, or service according to a certain characteristic on a scale from +5 to -5, indicating how well the characteristic describes the product or service. The following is an example of a staple scale question:

When thinking about Data Mining Technologies, Inc. (DMT), do you believe that the word “innovative” aptly describes or poorly describes the company? On a scale of +5 to -5 with +5 being “very good description of DMT” and -5 being “poor description of DMT,” how do you rank DMT according to the word “innovative”?

The Constant Sum Question
A constant sum question permits collection of “ratio” data, meaning that the data is able to express the relative value or importance of the options (option A is twice as important as option B)

Example:
The following question asks you to divide 100 points between a set of options to show the value or importance you place on each option. Distribute the 100 points giving the more important reasons a greater number of points. The computer will prompt you if your total does not equal exactly 100 points.

When thinking about the reasons you purchased our TargetFind data mining software, please rate the following reasons according to their relative importance.

Seamless integration with other software __________
User friendliness of software __________
Ability to manipulate algorithms __________
Level of pre- and post-purchase service __________
Level of value for the price __________
Convenience of purchase/quick delivery __________

This type of question is used when you are relatively sure of the reasons for purchase, or you want input on a limited number of reasons you feel are important. Questions must sum to 100 points and point totals are checked by javascript.

The Open-Ended Question
The open-ended question seeks to explore the qualitative, in-depth aspects of a particular topic or issue. It gives a person the chance to respond in detail. Although open-ended questions are important, they are time-consuming and should not be over-used. An example of an open-ended question might be:

(If the respondent indicates they did not find what they were looking for. )

What products of services were you looking for that were not found on our website?

If you want to add an “Other” answer to a multiple choice question, you would use branching instructions to come to an open ended question to find out What Other.

The Demographic Question
Demographic questions are an integral part of any questionnaire. They are used to identify characteristics such as age, gender, income, race, geographic place of residence, number of children, and so forth. For example demographic questions will help you to classify the difference between product users and non-users. Perhaps most of your customers come from the Northeast, are between the ages of 50 and 65, and have incomes between $50,000 and $75,000.

Demographic data helps you paint a more accurate picture of the group of persons you are trying to understand. And by better understanding the type of people who use or are likely to use your product, you can allocate promotional resources to reach these people, in a more cost effective manner.

Psycho-graphic or life style questions are also included in the template files. These questions provide an in-depth psychological profile and look at activities, interests and opinions of respondents.


Making Survey Questions Required #binweevils #crossword #answers


#i have a question and need an answer

#

Making Survey Questions Required

You can make any question in your survey required so that respondents must answer it before submitting the page. By default, required questions are marked by an asterisk (*), but you can choose to hide the asterisks from the OPTIONS section of the sidebar in the Design Survey section of your survey.

If respondents don t answer a required question, they will not be able to advance to the next page until they answer the question within the requirements. You can customize the error message that they see if they leave a required question blank, or if their answer doesn t meet the required range or limit.

When you analyze your results, you may notice that some respondents skipped required questions. This could mean that skip logic skipped them past the question, or that the respondent exited early.

Requiring an Answer to a Question

To require an answer to a question:

  1. Click the Design Survey tab.
  2. Click a question to edit it.
  3. Click the Options tab.
  4. Select Require an Answer to This Question .
  5. Customize the error message and set a required range or limit (optional).
  6. Click Save .

Requiring Questions in Bulk

You can require all the questions on a page at once, instead of changing the setting on each question one by one.

To require an answer to all questions on a page:

  1. In the Design Survey section, click More Actions at the top of the page whose questions you want to require.
  2. Click Require questions .

There s no way to undo this bulk action, but you can uncheck Require an Answer to This Question under the Options tab for individual questions if needed.

If you need to require a specific range or limit, or customize the error messages, you need to adjust these settings for each individual question.

Requiring a Specific Range or Limit

On question types that allow multiple answer choices, rows, or textboxes, you can set a range or a limit on how many the respondent must answer. The following requirements are available:

Then you can enter the number of answer choices you want to require the respondent to answer.

TIP! Customize the Error Message. If you set a specific range or limit on the number of required answer choices, customize the error message to be specific about these requirements. This will ensure that the respondents know what they did wrong so that they can successfully advance through the survey.

You can make any question in your survey required so that respondents must answer it before submitting the page. By default, required questions are marked by an asterisk (*), but you can choose to hide the asterisks from the OPTIONS section of the sidebar in the Design Survey section of your survey.

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THE LEADER IN ONLINE SURVEY SOFTWARE

Create Surveys

Quickly create online surveys and polls with our intuitive web based software tool. You can create your own survey, copy a professionally written survey template, or upload your survey directly from a Word file. With over 30 question types and dozens of color themes, QuestionPro makes it easy to create great looking questionnaires and surveys.

Collect Responses

Reach your customers wherever they are using our survey tools: email system, embedding in your website, creating pop-up and exit surveys, or posting to social networks like Facebook, Twitter, or Google+. QuestionPro surveys look great on mobile devices or tablets, and you can even collect responses offline using our iOS and Android mobile survey app.

Analyze Results

We make analysis easy with a full set of reporting features such as real-time summary, pivot tables, segmentation tools, trend analysis, and text analytics. You can also export your survey data directly to Excel, SPSS, or CSV. We make it easy to share results with formatted Word and PowerPoint reports or by generating great looking infographics.

Test the survey below to experience QuestionPro


Survey Questions 101: Do You Make any of These 7 Question Writing


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Survey Questions 101: Do You Make any of These 7 Question Writing Mistakes?

Details, details, details. Creating surveys that yield actionable insights is about details. And writing effective questions is the first step.

We see common mistakes that keep survey questions from being effective all the time.

Here are the 7 most common:

Survey Question Mistake #1: Failing to Avoid Leading Words / Questions

Subtle wording differences can produce great differences in results. “Could,” “should,” and “might” all sound about the same, but may produce a 20% difference in agreement to a question.

In additions, strong words such as “force” and “prohibit” represent control or action and can bias your results.

The government should force you to pay higher taxes.

No one likes to be forced, and no one likes higher taxes. This agreement scale question makes it sound doubly bad to raise taxes.

Wording alternatives can be developed. How about simple statements such as: The government should increase taxes, or the government needs to increase taxes.

How would you rate the career of legendary outfielder Joe Dimaggio?

This question tells you Joe Dimaggio is a legendary outfielder. This type of wording can bias respondents.

How about replacing the word “legendary” with “baseball” as in: How would you rate the career of baseball outfielder Joe Dimaggio?

Survey Question Mistake #2: Failing to Give Mutually Exclusive Choices

Multiple choice response options should be mutually exclusive so that respondents can make clear choices. Don’t create ambiguity for respondents.

Review your survey and identify ways respondents could get stuck with either too many or no correct answers.

What is your age?

What answer would you select if you were 10, 20, or 30? Questions like this will frustrate a respondent and invalidate your results.

What type of vehicle do you own?

This question has the same problem. What if the respondent owns a truck, hybrid, convertible, cross-over, motorcycle, or no vehicle at all?

Survey Question Mistake #3: Not Asking Direct Questions

Questions that are vague and do not communicate your intent can limit the usefulness of your results. Make sure respondents know what you’re asking.

What suggestions do you have for improving Tom’s Tomato Juice?

This question may be intended to obtain suggestions about improving taste, but respondents will offer suggestions about texture, the type of can or bottle, about mixing juices, or even suggestions relating to using tomato juice as a mixer or in recipes.

What do you like to do for fun?

Finding out that respondents like to play Scrabble isn’t what the researcher is looking for, but it may be the response received. It is unclear that the researcher is asking about movies vs. other forms of paid entertainment. A respondent could take this question in many directions.

Survey Question Mistake #4: Forgetting to Add a “Prefer Not to Answer” Option

Sometimes respondents may not want or be able to provide the information requested.

Questions about income, occupation, finances, family life, personal hygiene, and personal, political, or religious beliefs can be too intrusive and be rejected by the respondent.

Privacy is an important issue to most people. Incentives and assurances of confidentiality can make it easier to obtain private information.

While current research does not support that PNA (Prefer Not to Answer) options increase data quality or response rates, many respondents appreciate this non-disclosure option.

Furthermore, different cultural groups may respond differently. One recent study found that while U.S. respondents skip sensitive questions, Asian respondents often discontinue the survey entirely.

What is your race?

What is your age?

Did you vote in the last election?

What are your religious beliefs?

What are your political beliefs?

What is your annual household income?

These questions should be asked only when absolutely necessary. In addition, they should always include an option to not answer. (e.g. “Prefer Not to Answer”).

Survey Question Mistake #5: Failing to Cover All Possible Answer Choices

Do you have all of the options covered? If you are unsure, conduct a pretest using “Other (please specify)” as an option.

If more than 10% of respondents (in a pretest or otherwise) select “other,” you are probably missing an answer. Review the “Other” text your test respondents have provided and add the most frequently mentioned new options to the list.

You indicated that you eat at Joe s fast food once every 3 months. Why don t you eat at Joe s more often?

There isn t a location near my house

I don t like the taste of the food

Never heard of it

This question doesn’t include other options, such as healthiness of the food, price/value or some “other” reason. Over 10% of respondents would probably have a problem answering this question.

Survey Question Mistake #6: Not Using Unbalanced Scales Carefully

Unbalanced scales may be appropriate for some situations and promote bias in others.

For instance, a hospital might use an Excellent Very Good Good Fair scale where “Fair” is the lowest customer satisfaction point because they believe “Fair” is absolutely unacceptable and requires correction.

The key is to correctly interpret the scale. If “Fair” is the lowest point on a scale, then a result slightly better than fair is probably not a good one.

Additionally, scale points should represent equi-distant points on a scale. That is, they should have the same equal conceptual distance from one point to the next.

For example, researchers have shown the points to be nearly equi-distant on the strongly disagree–disagree–neutral–agree–strongly agree scale.

Set your bottom point as the worst possible situation and top point as the best possible, then evenly spread the labels for your scale points in-between.

What is your opinion of Crazy Justin s auto-repair?

This question puts the center of the scale at fantastic, and the lowest possible rating as “Pretty Good.” This question is not capable of collecting true opinions of respondents.

Survey Question Mistake #7: Not Asking Only One Question at a Time

There is often a temptation to ask multiple questions at once. This can cause problems for respondents and influence their responses.

Review each question and make sure it asks only one clear question.

What is the fastest and most economical Internet service for you?

This is really asking two questions. The fastest is often not the most economical.

How likely are you to go out for dinner and a movie this weekend?

Even though “dinner and a movie” is a common term, this is two questions as well. It is best to separate activities into different questions or give respondents these options:

Dinner and Movie

Summary

While not totally inclusive, these seven tips are common offenders in building quality questions.

Focus on creating clear questions and having an understandable, appropriate, and complete set of answer choices. Great questions and great answer choices lead to great research success.

What are some mistakes you ve made that you wish you wouldn t have? Comment below and let s discuss!


Market Survey Tools #marketsurveytools.com, #division #of #spherexx.com, #www.marketsurveytools.com, #multifamily #market #survey, #floorplan


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MARKET SURVEY TOOLS HAS THREE WAYS TO PROCURE PERTINENT MARKET DATA

Turnkey Market Survey – We collect, refine and report market intelligence

Acquired Pricing – Automatically populate published and crowd-sourced data

Market Research – Set up your market survey and train your staff members to create superior market analysis and reporting

Market analysis is only as trustworthy as the value of data input. As the CEO of CoStar stated: “. crowdsourced data can sometimes be more accurate than data gathered by CoStar’s research staff.”*

Whether delegating, contracting or populating marketing intelligence, Market Survey Tools offers the most advanced, dependable technology to support your critical marketing decisions.

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About Market Survey Tools Apartment Marketing Program

MarketSurveyTools.com creates an apartment market research analysis in just a few steps. Identify your competition; set up utility, apartment features, amenities, and pricing criteria to automatically create an apartment survey, occupancy report, and apartment pricing comparison study.

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