Burial – Cremation Laws in Washington #puget #sound #workers #compensation #trust


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Burial Cremation Laws in Washington

Each state has laws affecting what happens to a body after death. For example, most states have unique rules about embalming, burial or cremation, scattering ashes, and how to get a death certificate. Here are some answers to common questions about post-death matters in Washington.

How do I get a death certificate?

You may need to obtain copies of a death certificate for a number of reasons. If you are in charge of wrapping up the deceased person s affairs, you may require multiple, official copies to carry out your job. You will need to submit a certified copy of the death certificate each time you claim property or benefits that belonged to the deceased person, including life insurance proceeds, Social Security benefits, payable-on-death accounts, veterans benefits, and many others.

In Washington, a death certificate must be filed with the local registrar within three business days after the death and before the body is buried or cremated. (See RCW 70.58.160 .) The easiest way to get copies of a death certificate is to ask the person or organization that files the certificate to order them for you at the time of the death; usually this will be a funeral home, mortuary, or crematory. If you are the executor of the estate, you should ask for at least ten certified copies.

If you need to order copies of a death certificate after the time of death has passed, visit the website of the Washington State Department of Health. From the DOH website, you can download a mail-in order form or find information about ordering death certificates in-person, online, or by phone. Each copy of a Washington death certificate costs $20.

Who can order a death certificate?

Washington death certificates, unlike those in most other states, are considered public records. Anyone can order a certified copy of a death certificate.

Is embalming required?

Embalming is a process in which blood is drained from the body and replaced with fluids that delay disintegration. Though it is still a common procedure, embalming is rarely necessary; refrigeration serves the same purpose.

In Washington, a body must be embalmed or refrigerated until the time of burial or cremation. Before embalming a body, the embalmer must obtain permission from a family member or the legal representative of the deceased person. (RCW 18.39.215 .)

Is a casket necessary for burial or cremation?

A casket is often the single greatest expense incurred after a death. A casket can range from a simple $500 box to one that costs $20,000 or more for an elaborate design.

Burial. No law requires a casket for burial. However, you should check with the cemetery; it may have rules requiring a certain type of container.

Cremation. No law requires a casket for cremation. On the contrary, federal law requires a funeral home or crematory to inform you that you may use an alternative container, and to make such containers available to you. An alternative container may be made of unfinished wood, pressed wood, fiberboard, or cardboard.

Do I have to buy a casket from the funeral home?

No. Federal law requires funeral homes to accept caskets that consumers have purchased from another source, such as an online retailer. You may also build your own casket.

Where can bodies be buried in Washington?

In Washington, bodies must be buried in established cemeteries. All cemeteries must be run by corporations. You can find the rules governing cemeteries in Chapter 68.20 of the Revised Code of Washington .

Where can we store or scatter ashes after cremation?

In Washington, there are no state laws controlling where you may keep or scatter ashes. Ashes may be stored in a crypt, niche, grave, or container at home. If you wish to scatter ashes, you have many options. Cremation renders ashes harmless, so there is no public health risk involved in scattering ashes. Use common sense and refrain from scattering ashes in places where they would be obvious to others.

Washington provides guidance for cremation, including the scattering of ashes, on the Funerals and Cemeteries page of the Washington State Department of Licensing.

Scattering ashes in an established scattering garden. Many cemeteries provide gardens for scattering ashes. If you re interested, ask the cemetery for more information.

Scattering ashes on private land. You may scatter ashes on your own private property. If you want to scatter ashes on someone else s private land, it is wise to obtain permission from the landowner.

Scattering ashes on public land. You may wish to check both city and county regulations and zoning rules before scattering ashes on local public land, such as in a city park. The Washington State Department of Licensing states that ashes may be scattered on state trust uplands if you receiver permission from the regional manager for each scattering. When it comes to scattering on public state or local land, many people simply proceed as they wish, letting their best judgment be their guide.

Scattering ashes on federal land. Officially, you should request permission before scattering ashes on federal land. As with local or state land, however, you will probably encounter no resistance if you conduct the scattering ceremony quietly and keep the ashes well away from trails, roads, facilities, and waterways. You can find guidelines for scattering ashes on the websites for some national parks. For more information, begin your search at the website of the National Park Service .

Scattering ashes at sea. The federal Clean Water Act requires that cremated remains be scattered at least three nautical miles from land. The EPA does not permit scattering at beaches or in wading pools by the sea. Finally, you must notify the EPA within 30 days of scattering ashes at sea.

For more information, including the EPA contact person for Washington state, see Burial of Human Remains at Sea on the EPA website.

Scattering ashes on state-controlled waterways. The Washington State Department of Licensing states that ashes may be scattered over public navigable waters under state control, including Puget Sound. rivers, streams, and lakes.

Scattering ashes by air. While there are no state laws on this issue, federal aviation laws prohibit dropping objects that might injure people or damage property. The U.S. government does not consider cremains to be hazardous material; all should be well so long as you remove the ashes from their container before scattering.

Learn more

To learn about the federal Funeral Rule, which protects consumers in all states, visit the website of the Federal Trade Commission .

For more information about funeral laws in Washington, see Making Funeral Arrangements in Washington .

To find out more about funerals and other final arrangements, see the Getting Your Affairs in Order section of Nolo.com.

Talk to an Estate Planning attorney.


Wholesale security products systems distributor supplier #security #products, #security #equipment, #security, #security


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Wholesale Stocking Distributor, Supplier of Security Systems: CCTV Video, Alarms, Fire Alarms, Access, Nurse Call, Wire Cable, Hardware Accessories

We sincerely welcome you to our company.

Thank you for visiting. Our customers and suppliers say they find us to be unique as a leading wholesale security distributor, but that’s for you to discover and experience for yourself.

After years of experience in the industry working for other security distributors, we re proud that the company we started is now in it s
SECOND DECADE OF SERVICE!


The main question is, why choose us to do business with? You can buy equipment in a box from any security distributor or supplier. Want to do business with the largest distributor in the world? That’s not us. Want to align with the same old established firms that have been around for ages? That’s not us. The fastest growing security distributor in the Midwest? That’s us. How? By delivering on customer needs.

What do we deliver?

‘Real’ service, real performance, not empty promises.

  • Experienced system design and application assistance.
  • Direct help and tech savvy when you need it from pros.
  • A large local stock to draw from, with top manufacturers.
  • Personalized service from pros who, on average, have been in security and distribution seventeen years – average! Value-added service. We go beyond the box.

  • And like the old advertising slogan, We try harder! How can we help you? And please: you’re invited to test us – give us a chance to show you so you can discover the difference. Call us. Talk with us. Thank you.

    Candace O’Connor, Rich Blaha, Mike Steffancin, John Weber

    [ Co. background, info, people and photos, specialties, see About us. ]

    Building and o ffices of the Security Source under a blue-gray Cleveland sky,
    showing a part of the warehouse behind.


    For credit card authorization form
    go to Forms – Downloads – button below.

    PLEASE BOOKMARK THIS SITE (Control + D) AND RETURN SOON.
    THANK YOU. THE MANAGEMENT

    Stocking Security Distributor
    Fast Shipping
    Local will-call

    Alarm Diversified Security Providers

  • Institutions, M.R.O.s for Institutions


  • Dubspot Courses #dubspot, #music #production #nyc, #audio #production #classes, #audio #production #schools


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    Courses at Dubspot

    Find Your Music Production or DJ Education at Dubspot.

    Dubspot goes beyond software education and explores the core elements that inspire and shape the music you create. Our curriculum ranges from DJing to Sound Design to today’s most popular music creation tools. Whatever your interest, whatever your level of experience, we can help find the right class for you. Our courses are offered throughout the year with flexible class schedules, in NYC. LA and ONLINE .

    DJ / Producer Master Program

    EMP Master Program

    DJ / Producer Program

    DJ

  • Music Production

  • Music Foundations

  • Sound Design

  • Mixing and Mastering

    How Dubspot Courses are Organized.

    Experience our collection of carefully developed programs essential for today’s musical landscape. We provide a balanced education that teaches you how to create and/or perform your music. Select a program that interests you to learn more about the curriculum and related courses. You can check out upcoming start dates and class schedules by clicking “See Dates Register”. Enroll right online or call us if you have any questions.

    Explore Our Combination Programs

    Achieve your potential as a well-rounded artist. Leave with 4 new original tracks, a remix, and the skills to perform them live. DJ + Ableton Live .

    Learn the entire process of Electronic Music Production to create, and master your own tracks. Music Foundations + Music Production + Sound Design + Mixing Mastering .

    Master your artistic vision with the most complete collection of production and performance courses offered at Dubspot. DJ + EMP Master .

    Programs

    Develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of electronic music. Learn the language used to communicate musical ideas while applying basic keyboard and drum pad techniques.

    From inspiration to execution, our seasoned artist instructors help you discover your own sound and develop it into a unique body of work. Choose between Ableton Live and Logic Pro .

    Immerse yourself in the complete art of DJing. Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned pro, our curriculum is designed to accommodate all skill levels and styles of music.

    Factory content is great, but everyone has it – your mix needs something special. Learn the skills to sculpt your own sounds, create your own sonic library and define your own sound – using Native Instruments’ Komplete.

    Transform basic compositions into dance floor ready, commercial quality masters. Learn the well-kept industry secrets of EQ, compression, panning, level balancing, reverb and special effects.


  • Puget Sound Anglers State Board #puget #sound #anglers, #puget #sound #anglers #state


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    State Board Presidents Message

    I really hope many of you are enjoying our resources and by the time you read this crabbing is in full swing. Some areas showed in the tests that the biomass could be down as we have been at some all time highs.

    Fishing for kings will be open and hopefully with the cooling oceans we might start to see a shift in the quality of the fish. We need to see the bait recover so the fish can start eating again. If you have never fished salmon plugs, this is the time to do it. 5-6 in the sound and 6-7 in the ocean. Plugs are fished at 4 mph and faster are real producers-my go to favorite lure for bigger kings. Many people talk about not fishing them because they do not work. They don’t work because people tow them too slow. Once you get one that really catches fish, you guard it with your life.

    PSA is starting to work on salmon hatchery production to try to get our fish returns back up. Fighting over the last fish is not where we should be. It’s time to start going the other way. More fish=less fighting. This is sorely needed to start rebuilding fishing tin this great state. When fishing issues come to you, please ask yourself, Does this put us back on the water? This is the way we should look at anything we have to deal with. Too many times there are hidden agendas to decision making. Many times its not in our best interest. This should become second nature.

    There is an issue at play-our Crab Catch Record Card reporting program is being challenged in the northern Puget Sound by some tribes. We spent 10 years building this system with WDFW and it has to be one of the best accounting systems that the department has. We dont think there is a better system out there to account for. We were surprised that WDFW allowed a Pilot Program and the funding to do a check against this system when they are hurting for funding.

    The June 29 Baker Lake/Skokomish Eyed egg transfer meeting will have happened by then. This is where the Skokomish tribe is going to get eggs from Baker Lake to jump start a new sockeye program in the Hood Canal area. There is a lot of skepticism on allowing this to happen when they kicked us off of the Skokomish river. I would like to see us back on that river.

    I hope that you have a great summer and get to catch a lot of fish and crab. Be safe out there.

    Salmon for Soldiers 2017- It s ON! We are FISHIN !

    We will have a marked-selective COHO fishery in MA-10 during our event slated for August 26, 2017, out of the Port of Everett!

    Boater participation will be limited to the first 150 vessels. Must be registered to attend!

    For more information, visit the website at www.salmonforsoldiers.com and on Facebook, or call Randy at 425.330.0415.

    Join a PSA Chapter near you as we are working hard on your behalf to keep us on the water.

    Protecting Washington s Yelloweye Rockfish

    Did you know that some yelloweye rockfish that are here today were Washington residents before it became a state in 1889? They have been and continue to be an important part of our heritage.

    Halibut and bottomfish fishing have also been a part of Washington s culture for hundreds of years. Many generations of fishermen have relied on halibut and bottomfish for food and recreation.

    A recent stock assessment indicates that the yelloweye rockfish population has declined over 80% from its initial level. As a result, immediate action must be taken if the stocks of these long-lived fish are to be rebuilt.

    To rebuild yelloweye rockfish populations, the harvest opportunities for this species must be severely curtailed. In recent years, the Pacific Fishery Management Council has set yelloweye rockfish harvest levels for all commercial, recreational, and tribal fisheries combined for California, Oregon, and Washington of about 17 metric tons (mt). This number includes yelloweye rockfish that are discarded at sea.

    The Washington recreational harvest target is about 2.7 mt (fewer than 1,000 fish) in coastal waters. To put this in perspective, in 2001, the Washington recreational fishery harvested 15 mt.

    Halibut Fishery in Jeopardy

    Yelloweye rockfish, in general, are harvested during the Washington recreational halibut fishery. If the yelloweye rockfish catch is projected to exceed 2.7 mt, then Pacific ocean waters adjacent to Washington outside 25 fathoms will be closed to recreational bottomfish fishing (including halibut).

    If yelloweye rockfish cannot be avoided when anglers are targeting halibut, then we may have to close recreational halibut fishing in the future to protect yelloweye rockfish. Because the yelloweye rockfish stock may not be rebuilt for over 100 years, the problem of managing the yelloweye fishery will continue through our lifetime; however, you have the ability to help save the halibut fishery now and preserve the yelloweye resource for the future.

    Yelloweye Rockfish Facts:

    • Live to be 120 years old
    • Range extends from Mexico to Alaska
    • Found in deeper, rocky bottom areas
    • Slow growing,low productive species
    • Reddish-orange in color with bright yelloweye
    • Commonly called red snapper
    • Often spend their entire lifetime on one rockpile

    How You Can Help

    • If you are participating in the recreational halibut or bottomfish fishery, please avoid areas that are known to have yelloweye rockfish.
    • If you do accidentally catch a yelloweye, please return to the water s soon as possible.
    • Help spread the word to others about the severity of the yelloweye rockfish depleted population and the possible consequences of not avoiding yelloweye areas
    • If you do not know what areas may have yelloweye rockfish, please consult a local resort, motel, or charter office or other expert before fishing

    Great rockfish recompression video


    How much should an answering service cost? Sound Telecom Blog #cooking #questions


    #answering service pricing

    #

    Ok give it to me straight. How much should an answering service cost?

    Actually, this is a darn good question. But there is only one way to really answer it you must have your expectations set properly so that you understand my answer. You have to first decide what level of service you are looking for. Most everyone wants the best answering service in the world for next to nothing. I get that. But is that realistic?

    The other day, I spoke to a gentleman for almost 20 minutes. He wanted 24/7 live answering service support. He wanted all of his calls answered by a live person in 3 rings or less. He wanted little to no hold time ever on any of his calls and he wanted us to handle a very complicated emergency message relay involving several different people, email addresses and text message destinations. He finally told me that this critically important answering service would only be needed to handle about 15 to 20 calls per month. This was to be set up as a type of insurance policy to make sure that his new client (the one that was spending thousands of dollars a month on his services) was well taken care of. So I told the prospect I could provide that level of service for $45/month. He told me that my rates were outrageous and he hung up the phone on me. Clearly, this guy did not have realistic expectations.

    There are a couple of primary ways that answering services bill for their service by the call or by the minute. We bill by the minute so I will give you some general guidelines on per-minute pricing:

    Low quality buyer beware!

    Be careful Good services use these rates for VERY high volume customers (over 10,000 minutes monthly)

    Market rate you should expect to pay this rate for most usage plans (500 to 5,000 minutes per month)

    Market rate you should expect to pay this rate for most usage plans that are less than 500 minutes per month.

    I have come across several VERY SMALL operations that charge a per-minute rate between $.55 and $.70 per minute and provide very good service. But these telephone answering service operations are usually VERY SMALL operations. This means that you have a family-based business that works out of the basement of their home and they have about 30 to 50 answering customers. Yes, these services can provide great service to their 30 or 50 customers but these operations are NOT scalable for larger volumes. Further, they tend not to have any advanced technical features like, oh, text-to-cell message delivery. Also, they run into staffing issues quite frequently and cannot handle call spikes well. These are very small businesses that can only handle very small volumes of calls. If you are looking for $.55 to $.70 per minute answering service, you are not being realistic because the small mom-and-pop shops are the exception, not the rule.

    If you really want a quality operation that can handle low, medium and high volume then you should expect to pay somewhere between $.80 and $1.00 per minute based on the call volumes that you send into your chosen answering service. Most answering service calls take a minute and half to process. So let s say you are paying $.90 per minute. This means that an answered call is going to cost you $1.35. Is that too much? Well, if you operate a law practice and a prospective DUI client is worth about $15,000 in legal fees then I would say it is a $1.35 well-spent. What if you are a plumbing contractor? The average after-hour emergency service repair is going to be billed around $300. So is it worth $1.35 to your business to capture a $300 sale? Of course it is.

    You should always strive to get the best value for whatever you spend your money on. But when you are shopping for answering service, don t consider price as the ONLY guideline for making a good decision. There are a number of other factors you should be discussing with your vendor:

    • How quickly do your operators answer my calls?
    • Where are your agents based (USA or overseas)?
    • Is there hold time? How much?
    • Do you offer custom message delivery?
    • What kind of reports can I get?
    • Do your operators sound professional, friendly and courteous?
    • Who do I contact if I need to make changes?
    • Can you handle a complicated on-call list of after-hours personnel?
    • And on, and on

    Look at the WHOLE picture not just price. Use price as a consideration but make sure you are getting a quality service that will properly represent your business.

    Comments

    About Brian Gabriel

    As the Call Center Manager for Sound Telecom, Brian is responsible for overseeing the daily operations and long term success of the company while managing a variety of inbound customer support programs. He also has a hand in taking care of the Solaxis services division. Prior to joining Sound Telecom, Mr. Gabriel held management positions with several prominent Internet Services companies including XpenseWise.com and Greatfood.com. Brian started his career in advertising and sales before moving to Washington State. He joined AEI Music in 1995 and supervised their international customer service department and technical support call centers. Brian received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism with a minor in Spanish languages from San Diego State University. Brian teaches adult education at his church and actively supports Christian ministries.


    How much should an answering service cost? Sound Telecom Blog #peters #answers


    #answering service pricing

    #

    Ok give it to me straight. How much should an answering service cost?

    Actually, this is a darn good question. But there is only one way to really answer it you must have your expectations set properly so that you understand my answer. You have to first decide what level of service you are looking for. Most everyone wants the best answering service in the world for next to nothing. I get that. But is that realistic?

    The other day, I spoke to a gentleman for almost 20 minutes. He wanted 24/7 live answering service support. He wanted all of his calls answered by a live person in 3 rings or less. He wanted little to no hold time ever on any of his calls and he wanted us to handle a very complicated emergency message relay involving several different people, email addresses and text message destinations. He finally told me that this critically important answering service would only be needed to handle about 15 to 20 calls per month. This was to be set up as a type of insurance policy to make sure that his new client (the one that was spending thousands of dollars a month on his services) was well taken care of. So I told the prospect I could provide that level of service for $45/month. He told me that my rates were outrageous and he hung up the phone on me. Clearly, this guy did not have realistic expectations.

    There are a couple of primary ways that answering services bill for their service by the call or by the minute. We bill by the minute so I will give you some general guidelines on per-minute pricing:

    Low quality buyer beware!

    Be careful Good services use these rates for VERY high volume customers (over 10,000 minutes monthly)

    Market rate you should expect to pay this rate for most usage plans (500 to 5,000 minutes per month)

    Market rate you should expect to pay this rate for most usage plans that are less than 500 minutes per month.

    I have come across several VERY SMALL operations that charge a per-minute rate between $.55 and $.70 per minute and provide very good service. But these telephone answering service operations are usually VERY SMALL operations. This means that you have a family-based business that works out of the basement of their home and they have about 30 to 50 answering customers. Yes, these services can provide great service to their 30 or 50 customers but these operations are NOT scalable for larger volumes. Further, they tend not to have any advanced technical features like, oh, text-to-cell message delivery. Also, they run into staffing issues quite frequently and cannot handle call spikes well. These are very small businesses that can only handle very small volumes of calls. If you are looking for $.55 to $.70 per minute answering service, you are not being realistic because the small mom-and-pop shops are the exception, not the rule.

    If you really want a quality operation that can handle low, medium and high volume then you should expect to pay somewhere between $.80 and $1.00 per minute based on the call volumes that you send into your chosen answering service. Most answering service calls take a minute and half to process. So let s say you are paying $.90 per minute. This means that an answered call is going to cost you $1.35. Is that too much? Well, if you operate a law practice and a prospective DUI client is worth about $15,000 in legal fees then I would say it is a $1.35 well-spent. What if you are a plumbing contractor? The average after-hour emergency service repair is going to be billed around $300. So is it worth $1.35 to your business to capture a $300 sale? Of course it is.

    You should always strive to get the best value for whatever you spend your money on. But when you are shopping for answering service, don t consider price as the ONLY guideline for making a good decision. There are a number of other factors you should be discussing with your vendor:

    • How quickly do your operators answer my calls?
    • Where are your agents based (USA or overseas)?
    • Is there hold time? How much?
    • Do you offer custom message delivery?
    • What kind of reports can I get?
    • Do your operators sound professional, friendly and courteous?
    • Who do I contact if I need to make changes?
    • Can you handle a complicated on-call list of after-hours personnel?
    • And on, and on

    Look at the WHOLE picture not just price. Use price as a consideration but make sure you are getting a quality service that will properly represent your business.

    Comments

    About Brian Gabriel

    As the Call Center Manager for Sound Telecom, Brian is responsible for overseeing the daily operations and long term success of the company while managing a variety of inbound customer support programs. He also has a hand in taking care of the Solaxis services division. Prior to joining Sound Telecom, Mr. Gabriel held management positions with several prominent Internet Services companies including XpenseWise.com and Greatfood.com. Brian started his career in advertising and sales before moving to Washington State. He joined AEI Music in 1995 and supervised their international customer service department and technical support call centers. Brian received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism with a minor in Spanish languages from San Diego State University. Brian teaches adult education at his church and actively supports Christian ministries.


    How much should an answering service cost? Sound Telecom Blog #answer #to


    #answering service pricing

    #

    Ok give it to me straight. How much should an answering service cost?

    Actually, this is a darn good question. But there is only one way to really answer it you must have your expectations set properly so that you understand my answer. You have to first decide what level of service you are looking for. Most everyone wants the best answering service in the world for next to nothing. I get that. But is that realistic?

    The other day, I spoke to a gentleman for almost 20 minutes. He wanted 24/7 live answering service support. He wanted all of his calls answered by a live person in 3 rings or less. He wanted little to no hold time ever on any of his calls and he wanted us to handle a very complicated emergency message relay involving several different people, email addresses and text message destinations. He finally told me that this critically important answering service would only be needed to handle about 15 to 20 calls per month. This was to be set up as a type of insurance policy to make sure that his new client (the one that was spending thousands of dollars a month on his services) was well taken care of. So I told the prospect I could provide that level of service for $45/month. He told me that my rates were outrageous and he hung up the phone on me. Clearly, this guy did not have realistic expectations.

    There are a couple of primary ways that answering services bill for their service by the call or by the minute. We bill by the minute so I will give you some general guidelines on per-minute pricing:

    Low quality buyer beware!

    Be careful Good services use these rates for VERY high volume customers (over 10,000 minutes monthly)

    Market rate you should expect to pay this rate for most usage plans (500 to 5,000 minutes per month)

    Market rate you should expect to pay this rate for most usage plans that are less than 500 minutes per month.

    I have come across several VERY SMALL operations that charge a per-minute rate between $.55 and $.70 per minute and provide very good service. But these telephone answering service operations are usually VERY SMALL operations. This means that you have a family-based business that works out of the basement of their home and they have about 30 to 50 answering customers. Yes, these services can provide great service to their 30 or 50 customers but these operations are NOT scalable for larger volumes. Further, they tend not to have any advanced technical features like, oh, text-to-cell message delivery. Also, they run into staffing issues quite frequently and cannot handle call spikes well. These are very small businesses that can only handle very small volumes of calls. If you are looking for $.55 to $.70 per minute answering service, you are not being realistic because the small mom-and-pop shops are the exception, not the rule.

    If you really want a quality operation that can handle low, medium and high volume then you should expect to pay somewhere between $.80 and $1.00 per minute based on the call volumes that you send into your chosen answering service. Most answering service calls take a minute and half to process. So let s say you are paying $.90 per minute. This means that an answered call is going to cost you $1.35. Is that too much? Well, if you operate a law practice and a prospective DUI client is worth about $15,000 in legal fees then I would say it is a $1.35 well-spent. What if you are a plumbing contractor? The average after-hour emergency service repair is going to be billed around $300. So is it worth $1.35 to your business to capture a $300 sale? Of course it is.

    You should always strive to get the best value for whatever you spend your money on. But when you are shopping for answering service, don t consider price as the ONLY guideline for making a good decision. There are a number of other factors you should be discussing with your vendor:

    • How quickly do your operators answer my calls?
    • Where are your agents based (USA or overseas)?
    • Is there hold time? How much?
    • Do you offer custom message delivery?
    • What kind of reports can I get?
    • Do your operators sound professional, friendly and courteous?
    • Who do I contact if I need to make changes?
    • Can you handle a complicated on-call list of after-hours personnel?
    • And on, and on

    Look at the WHOLE picture not just price. Use price as a consideration but make sure you are getting a quality service that will properly represent your business.

    Comments

    About Brian Gabriel

    As the Call Center Manager for Sound Telecom, Brian is responsible for overseeing the daily operations and long term success of the company while managing a variety of inbound customer support programs. He also has a hand in taking care of the Solaxis services division. Prior to joining Sound Telecom, Mr. Gabriel held management positions with several prominent Internet Services companies including XpenseWise.com and Greatfood.com. Brian started his career in advertising and sales before moving to Washington State. He joined AEI Music in 1995 and supervised their international customer service department and technical support call centers. Brian received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism with a minor in Spanish languages from San Diego State University. Brian teaches adult education at his church and actively supports Christian ministries.


    How much should an answering service cost? Sound Telecom Blog #what #is


    #answering service pricing

    #

    Ok give it to me straight. How much should an answering service cost?

    Actually, this is a darn good question. But there is only one way to really answer it you must have your expectations set properly so that you understand my answer. You have to first decide what level of service you are looking for. Most everyone wants the best answering service in the world for next to nothing. I get that. But is that realistic?

    The other day, I spoke to a gentleman for almost 20 minutes. He wanted 24/7 live answering service support. He wanted all of his calls answered by a live person in 3 rings or less. He wanted little to no hold time ever on any of his calls and he wanted us to handle a very complicated emergency message relay involving several different people, email addresses and text message destinations. He finally told me that this critically important answering service would only be needed to handle about 15 to 20 calls per month. This was to be set up as a type of insurance policy to make sure that his new client (the one that was spending thousands of dollars a month on his services) was well taken care of. So I told the prospect I could provide that level of service for $45/month. He told me that my rates were outrageous and he hung up the phone on me. Clearly, this guy did not have realistic expectations.

    There are a couple of primary ways that answering services bill for their service by the call or by the minute. We bill by the minute so I will give you some general guidelines on per-minute pricing:

    Low quality buyer beware!

    Be careful Good services use these rates for VERY high volume customers (over 10,000 minutes monthly)

    Market rate you should expect to pay this rate for most usage plans (500 to 5,000 minutes per month)

    Market rate you should expect to pay this rate for most usage plans that are less than 500 minutes per month.

    I have come across several VERY SMALL operations that charge a per-minute rate between $.55 and $.70 per minute and provide very good service. But these telephone answering service operations are usually VERY SMALL operations. This means that you have a family-based business that works out of the basement of their home and they have about 30 to 50 answering customers. Yes, these services can provide great service to their 30 or 50 customers but these operations are NOT scalable for larger volumes. Further, they tend not to have any advanced technical features like, oh, text-to-cell message delivery. Also, they run into staffing issues quite frequently and cannot handle call spikes well. These are very small businesses that can only handle very small volumes of calls. If you are looking for $.55 to $.70 per minute answering service, you are not being realistic because the small mom-and-pop shops are the exception, not the rule.

    If you really want a quality operation that can handle low, medium and high volume then you should expect to pay somewhere between $.80 and $1.00 per minute based on the call volumes that you send into your chosen answering service. Most answering service calls take a minute and half to process. So let s say you are paying $.90 per minute. This means that an answered call is going to cost you $1.35. Is that too much? Well, if you operate a law practice and a prospective DUI client is worth about $15,000 in legal fees then I would say it is a $1.35 well-spent. What if you are a plumbing contractor? The average after-hour emergency service repair is going to be billed around $300. So is it worth $1.35 to your business to capture a $300 sale? Of course it is.

    You should always strive to get the best value for whatever you spend your money on. But when you are shopping for answering service, don t consider price as the ONLY guideline for making a good decision. There are a number of other factors you should be discussing with your vendor:

    • How quickly do your operators answer my calls?
    • Where are your agents based (USA or overseas)?
    • Is there hold time? How much?
    • Do you offer custom message delivery?
    • What kind of reports can I get?
    • Do your operators sound professional, friendly and courteous?
    • Who do I contact if I need to make changes?
    • Can you handle a complicated on-call list of after-hours personnel?
    • And on, and on

    Look at the WHOLE picture not just price. Use price as a consideration but make sure you are getting a quality service that will properly represent your business.

    Comments

    About Brian Gabriel

    As the Call Center Manager for Sound Telecom, Brian is responsible for overseeing the daily operations and long term success of the company while managing a variety of inbound customer support programs. He also has a hand in taking care of the Solaxis services division. Prior to joining Sound Telecom, Mr. Gabriel held management positions with several prominent Internet Services companies including XpenseWise.com and Greatfood.com. Brian started his career in advertising and sales before moving to Washington State. He joined AEI Music in 1995 and supervised their international customer service department and technical support call centers. Brian received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism with a minor in Spanish languages from San Diego State University. Brian teaches adult education at his church and actively supports Christian ministries.


    How much should an answering service cost? Sound Telecom Blog #answer #a


    #answering service pricing

    #

    Ok give it to me straight. How much should an answering service cost?

    Actually, this is a darn good question. But there is only one way to really answer it you must have your expectations set properly so that you understand my answer. You have to first decide what level of service you are looking for. Most everyone wants the best answering service in the world for next to nothing. I get that. But is that realistic?

    The other day, I spoke to a gentleman for almost 20 minutes. He wanted 24/7 live answering service support. He wanted all of his calls answered by a live person in 3 rings or less. He wanted little to no hold time ever on any of his calls and he wanted us to handle a very complicated emergency message relay involving several different people, email addresses and text message destinations. He finally told me that this critically important answering service would only be needed to handle about 15 to 20 calls per month. This was to be set up as a type of insurance policy to make sure that his new client (the one that was spending thousands of dollars a month on his services) was well taken care of. So I told the prospect I could provide that level of service for $45/month. He told me that my rates were outrageous and he hung up the phone on me. Clearly, this guy did not have realistic expectations.

    There are a couple of primary ways that answering services bill for their service by the call or by the minute. We bill by the minute so I will give you some general guidelines on per-minute pricing:

    Low quality buyer beware!

    Be careful Good services use these rates for VERY high volume customers (over 10,000 minutes monthly)

    Market rate you should expect to pay this rate for most usage plans (500 to 5,000 minutes per month)

    Market rate you should expect to pay this rate for most usage plans that are less than 500 minutes per month.

    I have come across several VERY SMALL operations that charge a per-minute rate between $.55 and $.70 per minute and provide very good service. But these telephone answering service operations are usually VERY SMALL operations. This means that you have a family-based business that works out of the basement of their home and they have about 30 to 50 answering customers. Yes, these services can provide great service to their 30 or 50 customers but these operations are NOT scalable for larger volumes. Further, they tend not to have any advanced technical features like, oh, text-to-cell message delivery. Also, they run into staffing issues quite frequently and cannot handle call spikes well. These are very small businesses that can only handle very small volumes of calls. If you are looking for $.55 to $.70 per minute answering service, you are not being realistic because the small mom-and-pop shops are the exception, not the rule.

    If you really want a quality operation that can handle low, medium and high volume then you should expect to pay somewhere between $.80 and $1.00 per minute based on the call volumes that you send into your chosen answering service. Most answering service calls take a minute and half to process. So let s say you are paying $.90 per minute. This means that an answered call is going to cost you $1.35. Is that too much? Well, if you operate a law practice and a prospective DUI client is worth about $15,000 in legal fees then I would say it is a $1.35 well-spent. What if you are a plumbing contractor? The average after-hour emergency service repair is going to be billed around $300. So is it worth $1.35 to your business to capture a $300 sale? Of course it is.

    You should always strive to get the best value for whatever you spend your money on. But when you are shopping for answering service, don t consider price as the ONLY guideline for making a good decision. There are a number of other factors you should be discussing with your vendor:

    • How quickly do your operators answer my calls?
    • Where are your agents based (USA or overseas)?
    • Is there hold time? How much?
    • Do you offer custom message delivery?
    • What kind of reports can I get?
    • Do your operators sound professional, friendly and courteous?
    • Who do I contact if I need to make changes?
    • Can you handle a complicated on-call list of after-hours personnel?
    • And on, and on

    Look at the WHOLE picture not just price. Use price as a consideration but make sure you are getting a quality service that will properly represent your business.

    Comments

    About Brian Gabriel

    As the Call Center Manager for Sound Telecom, Brian is responsible for overseeing the daily operations and long term success of the company while managing a variety of inbound customer support programs. He also has a hand in taking care of the Solaxis services division. Prior to joining Sound Telecom, Mr. Gabriel held management positions with several prominent Internet Services companies including XpenseWise.com and Greatfood.com. Brian started his career in advertising and sales before moving to Washington State. He joined AEI Music in 1995 and supervised their international customer service department and technical support call centers. Brian received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism with a minor in Spanish languages from San Diego State University. Brian teaches adult education at his church and actively supports Christian ministries.


    How much should an answering service cost? Sound Telecom Blog #cryptic #clue


    #answering service pricing

    #

    Ok give it to me straight. How much should an answering service cost?

    Actually, this is a darn good question. But there is only one way to really answer it you must have your expectations set properly so that you understand my answer. You have to first decide what level of service you are looking for. Most everyone wants the best answering service in the world for next to nothing. I get that. But is that realistic?

    The other day, I spoke to a gentleman for almost 20 minutes. He wanted 24/7 live answering service support. He wanted all of his calls answered by a live person in 3 rings or less. He wanted little to no hold time ever on any of his calls and he wanted us to handle a very complicated emergency message relay involving several different people, email addresses and text message destinations. He finally told me that this critically important answering service would only be needed to handle about 15 to 20 calls per month. This was to be set up as a type of insurance policy to make sure that his new client (the one that was spending thousands of dollars a month on his services) was well taken care of. So I told the prospect I could provide that level of service for $45/month. He told me that my rates were outrageous and he hung up the phone on me. Clearly, this guy did not have realistic expectations.

    There are a couple of primary ways that answering services bill for their service by the call or by the minute. We bill by the minute so I will give you some general guidelines on per-minute pricing:

    Low quality buyer beware!

    Be careful Good services use these rates for VERY high volume customers (over 10,000 minutes monthly)

    Market rate you should expect to pay this rate for most usage plans (500 to 5,000 minutes per month)

    Market rate you should expect to pay this rate for most usage plans that are less than 500 minutes per month.

    I have come across several VERY SMALL operations that charge a per-minute rate between $.55 and $.70 per minute and provide very good service. But these telephone answering service operations are usually VERY SMALL operations. This means that you have a family-based business that works out of the basement of their home and they have about 30 to 50 answering customers. Yes, these services can provide great service to their 30 or 50 customers but these operations are NOT scalable for larger volumes. Further, they tend not to have any advanced technical features like, oh, text-to-cell message delivery. Also, they run into staffing issues quite frequently and cannot handle call spikes well. These are very small businesses that can only handle very small volumes of calls. If you are looking for $.55 to $.70 per minute answering service, you are not being realistic because the small mom-and-pop shops are the exception, not the rule.

    If you really want a quality operation that can handle low, medium and high volume then you should expect to pay somewhere between $.80 and $1.00 per minute based on the call volumes that you send into your chosen answering service. Most answering service calls take a minute and half to process. So let s say you are paying $.90 per minute. This means that an answered call is going to cost you $1.35. Is that too much? Well, if you operate a law practice and a prospective DUI client is worth about $15,000 in legal fees then I would say it is a $1.35 well-spent. What if you are a plumbing contractor? The average after-hour emergency service repair is going to be billed around $300. So is it worth $1.35 to your business to capture a $300 sale? Of course it is.

    You should always strive to get the best value for whatever you spend your money on. But when you are shopping for answering service, don t consider price as the ONLY guideline for making a good decision. There are a number of other factors you should be discussing with your vendor:

    • How quickly do your operators answer my calls?
    • Where are your agents based (USA or overseas)?
    • Is there hold time? How much?
    • Do you offer custom message delivery?
    • What kind of reports can I get?
    • Do your operators sound professional, friendly and courteous?
    • Who do I contact if I need to make changes?
    • Can you handle a complicated on-call list of after-hours personnel?
    • And on, and on

    Look at the WHOLE picture not just price. Use price as a consideration but make sure you are getting a quality service that will properly represent your business.

    Comments

    About Brian Gabriel

    As the Call Center Manager for Sound Telecom, Brian is responsible for overseeing the daily operations and long term success of the company while managing a variety of inbound customer support programs. He also has a hand in taking care of the Solaxis services division. Prior to joining Sound Telecom, Mr. Gabriel held management positions with several prominent Internet Services companies including XpenseWise.com and Greatfood.com. Brian started his career in advertising and sales before moving to Washington State. He joined AEI Music in 1995 and supervised their international customer service department and technical support call centers. Brian received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism with a minor in Spanish languages from San Diego State University. Brian teaches adult education at his church and actively supports Christian ministries.