Illusions – Kids Environment Kids Health – National Institute of Environmental Health


#rebus puzzle answers

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Illusions

If you stare at the following picture long enough, you should see a giraffe.

Gotcha! But the rest of these optical illusions are on the level.

What are illusions? Illusions trick us into perceiving something differently than it actually exists, so what we see does not correspond to physical reality. Hence, the word illusion comes from the Latin verb illudere meaning, “to mock.” In addition, some illusions show us one thing in a picture, while someone else sees something entirely different in the same picture.

Research scientists must be sure that the results of their work are not “illusory” in nature. They need to accurately report what “is,” rather than their general “impression” of “what is.” So, many times a scientist will repeat an experiment many times, or in different laboratories, to ensure that their results were valid. Science is only “good science” when anyone can repeat the experiment and get the same results.

Other stuff you might like.
Meet the Scientist!

Scientists – who they are and what they do.


Psychology Degree Programs – Department Information #ba #psychology,college #of #arts #and #sciences,ma


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Psychology

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Bulletins

Dr. Nicole Caporino. Assistant Professor of Psychology, has been selected as a 2016 “Rising Star” by the Association for Psychological Science (APS). The APS explains that “The Rising Star designation recognizes outstanding psychological scientists in the earliest stages of their research career post-PhD whose innovative work has already advanced the field and signals great potential for their continued contributions.”

Psychologist-in-Residence and Director of the Psychobiology of Healing Program in AU’s Department of Psychology, Deborah Norris, Ph.D. recently published a book entitled In the Flow: Passion, Purpose, and the Power of Mindfulness. The book describes the function and practice of mindfulness meditation for lowering stress and enabling emotional regulation. It also presents corresponding scientific research and theories about the neurobehavioral mechanisms of action of meditation.
In the Flow is intended for those who experience stress and would like to learn the evidence-basis for gaining greater control of emotions, and for creating more ease in life.
In the Flow is available for purchase here (https://www.amazon.com/Flow-Passion-Purpose-Power-Mindfulness/dp/1532976909/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8 qid=1485280420 sr=8-1 keywords=in+the+flow ).

Upcoming Theses Dissertation Defenses

Leah Rothschild will defend her dissertation on Friday, July 14, 2017 from 12-3 pm in Asbury 336. The title of her dissertation is: Parental Treatment Acceptability of Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions for Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

David Haaga, Ph.D. James Gray, Ph.D. Allison Ratto, Ph.D. Yael Granader, Ph.D. (outside reader)

Emily Farr will defend her dissertation on Thursday, July 27, 2017 from 9:00 am-12:00 pm. The title of her dissertation is: Fear of Emotion and Antecedent Emotion Regulation.

Anthony Ahrens Ph.D. chair
Kathleen Gunthert Ph.D.
Nathaniel Herr Ph.D.
outside reader Sue Wenze Ph.D.


Dallas Campus #texas #tech #university #health #sciences #center,ttuhsc,school,allied #health,medicine,nursing,pharmacy,biomedical #science


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news announcements.

Accreditation

The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award baccalaureate, masters, doctoral, and professional degrees. TTUHSC at Dallas is a branch campus of TTUHSC. Therefore, the continued accreditation of this campus is contingent upon the continued accreditation of TTUHSC. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. The Commission should be contacted only if there is evidence that appears to support the institution’s significant non-compliance with a requirement or standard.

  • Welcome to the Health Science Center
  • TTUHSC Strategic Plan
  • Prepare for your future.

    The Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex offers extensive cutting-edge pharmacy practice opportunities in area hospitals, clinics, pharmacies, extended care facilities and industrial institutions. TTUHSC’s Doctor of Pharmacy program in Dallas/Fort Worth takes advantage of these opportunities to provide exemplary educational opportunities while instilling in students the time-tested traditions and values associated with the pharmacy profession. State-of-the-art teaching technology ensures that future pharmacists receive a comprehensive, practical education spanning a broad range of health issues and prepares future pharmacists for careers in all areas of practice. The DFW campus offers postgraduate training and experiences in diverse areas to prepare for specialty practice and research careers. Exposure to real-world experiences is emphasized at the Dallas / Fort Worth campus so that our students may better understand and can meet the challenges of our ever-evolving profession.

    Make an impact.

    Since TTUHSC-SOP opened in 1996, one-third of the student population has come from within a 100-mile radius of Dallas, Fort Worth, Arlington, Irving, and Plano. In 1999 the School expanded its innovative professional program into Dallas / Fort Worth and has been working to ease the critical shortage of pharmacists in the Metroplex ever since. Institutional affiliations with the North Texas Veterans Administration, Baylor University Medical Center, Children’s Medical Center, Cook Children’s Medical Center, Harris-Methodist Health System, Methodist Hospital Dallas, Parkland Memorial and Presbyterian Medical Center have provided critical resources and have helped the SOP and the Dallas / Fort Worth campus forge a national reputation for its active involvement in the complex health issues associated with clinical pharmacy and research.

    Today, the DFW center has facilities located at both the North Texas Veterans Administration Medical Center and within the central Dallas Medical District. More than 80 third- and fourth-year pharmacy students and up to 20 postgraduate practice and specialty pharmacy residents receive their education and training in the Metroplex and are preparing to become future professional pharmacy leaders.

    The SOP’s Pediatric Pharmacology Research and Development Center is located at Children’s Medical Center in Dallas and is a cooperative initiative of TTUHSC, CMCD and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.


  • Province of MB #winnipeg,manitoba,canada,pediatric,cardiac,surgery,inquest,hsc,hsc,health #sciences #center,health #sciences #centre


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    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) refers to the grouping of certain congenital cardiac defects. The main characteristics are the marked hypoplasia (underdevelopment) or even absence of the left ventricle and severe hypoplasia of the aorta. Often a localized pinching (coarctation) of the aorta is also present. The main pulmonary artery is enlarged, and gives rise to a large ductus arteriosus. This allows blood to flow from the right ventricle into the aorta and out to the body. Other characteristics of HLHS often include a combination of aortic and mitral stenosis or aortic and mitral atresia.

    Diagram 2.19 Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS)
    1 – patent foramen ovale
    2 – pinched aorta
    3 – patent ductus arteriosus
    4 – narrowed aorta
    5 – hypoplastic left ventricle
    6 – aortic atresia
    The lack of a developed left ventricle, plus the aortic coarctation leads to reversed blood flow through the aorta. Partially oxygenated blood reaches the aorta after travelling through the patent foramen ovale, up the pulmonary trunk and through the patent ductus arteriosus. The major blood flow to the systemic circulation is through the PDA.

    HLHS is also used to describe cases in which the right ventricle is hypoplastic and the child also suffers from transposition of the great arteries. In such cases the hypoplastic right heart pumps into the same artery that the left ventricle normally pumps blood through, and therefore the circulation is the same as in HLHS. This is sometimes referred to as functional HLHS.

    Diagram 2.20 Functional hypoplastic left heart syndrome
    1 – patent foramen ovale or atrial septal defect secundum
    2 – tricuspid valve atresia
    3 – hypoplastic aortic arch
    4 – patent ductus arteriosus
    5 – transposition of the great arteries
    6 – restrictive muscular ventricular septal defect
    7 – hypoplastic right ventricle
    De-oxygenated blood flows from the right atrium through an atrial septal defect into the left atrium. There it mixes with oxygenated blood returning from the lungs. A portion of this blood flows from the left ventricle up the pulmonary trunk to the lungs and through the patent ductus arteriosus to the body. Another portion of this blood flows through a ventricular septal defect, and is pumped by the hypoplastic right ventricle up the aorta.

    HLHS is a severe form of congenital heart disease. Without surgical intervention, HLHS is fatal. Infants are often diagnosed within 24 to 48 hours of birth. Symptoms appear when the ductus arteriosus begins to close.

    There are three options for treating these children: supportive care until death occurs, staged reconstruction of the heart, or a heart transplant.

    Before surgical treatment was developed, at least 90 per cent of infants with this condition died by the age of one month. Even today, some infants are not candidates for surgical therapy. For these infants, supportive care is the only option. Exactly what this care entails will depend on the condition of the infant, but would likely include assistance with breathing, the provision of fluids and management of pain.

    Reconstruction of the heart

    Staged reconstruction is the treatment of choice for hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Reconstruction takes place in three stages.

    The first stage, known as a Norwood operation, is undertaken as soon as possible after birth. This stage calls for a homograft 1 to be used to enlarge the rudimentary aortic arch and then join it to the pulmonary trunk. This is known as an anastomosis. The pulmonary trunk will have been disconnected from the left and right pulmonary arteries. The newly created blood vessel functions as the patient’s aorta. The right ventricle then becomes a common ventricle, pumping blood through the aorta to the rest of the body.

    Blood flow to the lungs is provided by means of a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt joining the innominate artery to the pulmonary artery. This increases the flow of oxygen-enriched blood that will be sent to the body. The Norwood operation also involves making a hole in the wall between the left and right atria. In medical terms this is known as an atrial septectomy.

    Diagram 2.21 Stage 1 of hypoplastic left heart syndrome reconstruction (Norwood)
    1 – Blalock-Taussig shunt (temporary)
    2 – atrial septum removed
    3 – patch where pulmonary trunk is disconnected from left and right pulmonary artery
    4 – aorta and pulmonary trunk anastomosed together and the aorta made larger
    Blood flows through the anastomosed aorta and pulmonary trunk to the aortic arch. A shunt connects the aorta to the pulmonary arteries, providing the lungs with blood to oxygenate.

    After the Norwood operation, children require medical management with various drugs. Some drugs, such as digoxin, are needed to improve the strength of the heart’s contractions, and other drugs, such as diuretics, are required to remove excess fluid from the body.

    The second stage of reconstruction is undertaken between three and ten months of age. Stage two involves performing a bidirectional Glenn shunt or a hemi-Fontan. (This is also known as a partial Fontan or a Bidirectional Cavo-Pulmonary Shunt.)

    A bidirectional Glenn shunt is performed by connecting the superior vena cava (SVC) to the right branch of the pulmonary artery. As a result, venous blood from the head and upper limbs will pass directly to the lungs, bypassing the right ventricle. However, the venous blood from the lower half of the body will continue to return to the heart.

    While avoiding the risk of failure of a complete Fontan operation, the partial Fontan helps to relieve symptoms. The procedure decreases the volume of blood delivered to the single ventricle, thus reducing the amount of work that the ventricle must perform. Post-operatively, oxygen saturation is improved.

    In addition, because the bi-directional Glenn is a low-pressure shunt, it does not carry the risk of causing thickening and hardening of the blood vessels of the lungs. (This is a normal response of the lung’s blood vessels to high pressures.) This operation creates a more favorable setting in which to complete a Fontan reconstruction at one and a half to two years of age.

    Diagram 2.22 Stage 2 of hypoplastic left heart syndrome reconstruction
    1 – superior vena cava connected to pulmonary artery
    2 – takedown of Blalock-Taussig shunt
    De-oxygenated blood from the superior vena cava is routed directly to the lungs. A mix of oxygenated and de-oxygenated blood is sent to the body through the anastomosed aorta and pulmonary trunk.

    At 18 to 24 months of age, if the patient does well after the Glenn shunt and pulmonary resistance remains low, the third stage of reconstruction is possible. This involves the completion of the Fontan procedure (as described in the earlier discussion of tricuspid atresia).

    With the Fontan operation, the venous blood from the lower part of the body is also diverted to the lungs, thus creating the ‘complete’ Fontan circulation. However, if the child is not well or the pulmonary resistance is considered too high, then no further surgical treatment is possible.

    Diagram 2.23 Stage 3 of hypoplastic left heart syndrome reconstruction (Fenestrated Fontan)
    1 – conduit joining inferior vena cava and superior vena cava to right pulmonary artery
    2 – artificial wall containing small hole (to separate blue blood from red blood in atria and to channel blue blood from lower body to pulmonary artery.
    De-oxygenated blood from the superior vena cava and inferior vena cava is routed directly to the lungs. Oxygenated blood is sent to the body through the anastomosed aorta and pulmonary trunk.

    Heart transplantation is carried out using the same basic techniques as for other transplants. In the case of pediatric heart transplants, the greatest problem is that infant donor hearts are in short supply. Thus transplantation is a treatment for only a limited number of babies with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In addition, recipients can survive only with the assistance of heavy doses of expensive medication to prevent rejection of the transplanted tissue. These drugs also have significant side-effects, such as the risk of infection and lymphatic cancer, and must be taken by recipients for the rest of their lives. For those reasons, heart transplants are not considered the standard treatment for children suffering from HLHS.

    A homograft is a graft of tissue between animals of the same species. In the case of humans, a homograft comes from a tissue donor. A homograft is in contrast to an autograft, which is a graft of tissue transferred from another part of the patient’s body. With pulmonary homografts, the pulmonary artery is removed from a tissue donor shortly after death. The pulmonary homograft is prepared and stored indefinitely at -70 degrees Celsius in liquid nitrogen until needed, when it is thawed and prepared under sterile conditions .


    Health Sciences Campus #health #sciences #campus


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    Health Sciences Campus

    The 79-acre USC Health Sciences campus is located northeast of Downtown Los Angeles and adjacent to Los Angeles County+USC Medical Center, a partner of the university s medical school since 1885. Housing the Keck School of Medicine of USC, the School of Pharmacy, programs in occupational sciences and physical therapy, and research laboratories for the School of Dentistry as well as three major teaching hospitals, this campus is a focal point for students, patients and scientists from around the world.

    Visit us to learn of our featured programs and of upcoming events, or for more information, contact:

    Zul Surani
    Executive Director of Community Partnerships, Health Sciences Campus
    USC Civic Engagement
    (323) 442-7808

    Featured Programs

    A few months ago, Mirta Matura spent her Saturday mornings sleeping in, watching TV for a while and, in her words, “lingering around the house doing nothing.”

    But for the last 12 weeks, she’s switched up her routine.

    “Now I get up, take a shower and get ready for the program,” Matura, 42, said.

    That program is Fit Families, now in its 11th year. Put on by the USC Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, the free program takes place every Saturday and includes a three-hour guided workout followed by nutrition education.

    Energetically dribbling a basketball in the gymnasium at Bravo Medical Magnet High School, you’d never guess Matura was barely walking with the help of a cane a year ago.

    In 2016, she experienced two health scares — a stroke in February followed by a lupus diagnosis in July.

    A few months ago, while at her local YMCA, she was turned on to Fit Families by Oscar Gallardo, a USC physical therapy instructor.

    Since then, it’s changed her life — and her mom’s, too.

    “She said, ‘Why don’t you join me?’,” recalled her mom, Soila Bevas, 59. “I really love the program.”

    On Jan. 28, they joined about a dozen other participants doing circuit training — cardio, stretches and strength training with resistance bands.

    “Our goal is that by them learning to do it on Saturday, then the rest of the week they can go in their neighborhoods and work out together,” said Cheryl Resnik, the USC physical therapy professor who founded the program. Full story here .

    Welcome to the Eastside Café, a musical sanctuary for its neighborhood

    Angela Flores and local residents stand outside of El Sereno’s Eastside Café. Flores has helped to turn the café into a creative oasis. (Photo/Michael Becerra/Elefante Collective)

    For USC Thornton School of Music graduate student Angela Flores, every weekend begins the same way.

    Early Saturday morning, she opens up the Eastside Café and welcomes an enthusiastic crowd of local residents to their weekly music lesson. She leads the group in a son jarocho fandango, a traditional jam session from southern Mexico that focuses on rhythm and guitar.

    The morning gatherings not only bring joy to Flores, but they provide a musical sanctuary for the Los Angeles neighborhood of El Sereno, where gentrification is looming and resources for art, education and community-building are few and far between.

    Surprisingly, the Eastside Café isn’t actually a coffee shop, but a community gathering space, hosting everything from ESL classes to jiu jitsu, meetings, exhibitions and, of course, music.

    Such is the beauty of the café, founded in 2002 by artist-activist community members, including the Flores family, and supported by volunteers.

    “It’s the only space for art for blocks,” Flores said. Through her work with USC’s Arts Leadership program, she is helping to ensure that the café thrives into the years ahead. More here .

    The USC Health Sciences Campus Office of Community Partnerships (HSC CP) launched a USC jobs awareness on a mobile computer technology van provided by Southeast Community Development Corporation on July 9th at the Abraham Lincoln High School.

    The employment program’s goal is to build awareness of available jobs at USC both on the Health Sciences Campus and the University Park Campus. More here .

    Promoting Entry-Level Job Opportunities in Health and Biotechnology
    Through a partnership between the Worker Education and Resource Center (WERC), an initiative around promoting entry-level jobs in health care and biotechnology has begun. A convening with large health care, education and training organizations was held at USC s Health Science Campus on March 19, 2015 to discuss entry-level jobs created as a result of the Affordable Care Act and the potential of new jobs emerging from the proposed biotechnology corridor also on the Eastside. The discussion centered on the types of changes required by business, education and economic development sectors to attempt to align and meet the demand for these jobs. In addition, all agreed to create a local pipeline to ensure various sectors are engaged at all times and coordinated to meet this emerging demand. More about the partnership here .

    Good Neighbors Grantees
    A number of community organizations around the Health Sciences campus have received funding by the Good Neighbors Campaign, USC s employee giving program. For a full list go here .

    Neighborhood Academic Initiative
    For the first time in its history, the USC Neighborhood Academic Initiative has expanded beyond South Los Angeles to include more than 100 sixth-graders near the university’s Health Sciences Campus (HSC) in East Los Angeles.

    All 66 sixth-graders at Murchison Elementary School will participate, and another 35 will join the program from nearby El Sereno Elementary. The students will attend Saturday NAI classes, tutoring and other workshops at HSC in Boyle Heights. Eventually the program will ramp up to serve about 600 students from sixth through 12th grade. More here .

    Pick-up the latest edition of the Fototelenovela on second-hand smoke. Fotonovelas—small booklets that portray a dramatic story using photographs and captions—represent a powerful health education tools on topics such as asthma, diabetes, breast cancer prevention.


    Communication Sciences and Disorders #undergraduate #degree #in #communication #sciences #and #disorders


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    Communication Sciences and Disorders

    Kinzie Murphy Challenge Gift: From Excellent to Exceptional

    The Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders (Speech Pathology and Audiology) is pleased to announce a special Challenge Grant for gifts directed to the Language, Speech, and Hearing Building Fund.

    A generous contribution from Kinzie Murphy, M.S. CCC-SLP will match all gifts of $1,000 or less to the Language, Speech, and Hearing Building Fund for the Department of Speech Pathology Audiology Campaign. Gifts, effective immediately, will be matched as follows:

    All campaign gifts to $250 Two-to-one match

    All campaign gifts $251 to $1,000 One-to-one match

    2016 Sacramento State Distinguished Alumni Award Honoree

    Dr. Deborah Ross-Swain 73, MS ’75 (Speech Pathology and Audiology), Director/Owner, The Swain Center
    For thousands of children and adults with communication, learning or processing disorders, Dr. Deborah Ross-Swain is a beacon of light in a dark and confusing world. Swain founded her Santa Rosa practice in 1985 with a focus on pediatric early intervention for speech and language development delays, as well as autism and autism spectrum disorders. Swain is also a past president of the California Association of Speech Pathologists and Audiologists in Private Practice.

    The Distinguished Alumni Awards event was held on Thursday, April 28th, at the Harper Alumni Center, Sacramento State. For more details on the event, visit: http://www.csus.edu/alum/programs/daa.html

    To view the video of Dr. Deborah Ross-Swain’s acceptance speech, visit https://youtu.be/ZJw5jBnLWL4

    Clinical Research and Community Service: Making A Global Impact

    The Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders (Speech Pathology and Audiology) at Sacramento State offers an impressive level of expertise to the Sacramento community and surrounding areas. The clinic, housed within the department, provides assessment and treatment services for a wide variety of children and adults with communication disorders.

    Providing innovative, evidence-based assessment and treatment methodologies to those seeking to improve their functional communication skills has been a primary focus of speech and language therapy offered in our clinic. All assessments and therapy are conducted by graduate student clinicians under direct supervision
    of department faculty.

    Our faculty are nationally and internationally recognized as experts in our field. They possess both national certification and state licenses in speech-language pathology or audiology. Our Clinical Research and Community Outreach activities impact not only the Sacramento region, but also in communities across the globe.

    Destination: Folsom Hall

    New Name, New Digs.
    In 2017 the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders (formerly Speech Pathology Audiology) is moving from Shasta Hall to Folsom Hall!

    Check back for details, timelines and other exciting news.

    Strategic Plan

    Mission

    The Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders trains highly competent professionals in the fields of speech-language pathology and audiology by providing a rigorous scientific background and diverse clinical experiences while fostering a dedication to lifelong learning and community service.

    Vision

    The Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders will be widely recognized as a leader in the innovative education of speech-language pathologists and audiologists.

    Values

    • Student Success
    • Community Engagement and Service
    • Well-Being
    • Diversity
    • Inclusion and Access
    • Leadership
    • Professional Ethics
    • Excellence in Teaching, Service, and Scholarship
    • Social Responsibility
    • Collaboration and Interprofessional Education
    • Innovation
    • Global Engagement

    Strategic Goals

    • Encourage innovative teaching
    • Provide opportunities for research, scholarly and creative activities
    • Enhance community partnerships to promote student success
    • Provide sequenced, integrated academic and clinical training

    Illusions – Kids Environment Kids Health – National Institute of Environmental Health


    #rebus puzzle answers

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    Illusions

    If you stare at the following picture long enough, you should see a giraffe.

    Gotcha! But the rest of these optical illusions are on the level.

    What are illusions? Illusions trick us into perceiving something differently than it actually exists, so what we see does not correspond to physical reality. Hence, the word illusion comes from the Latin verb illudere meaning, “to mock.” In addition, some illusions show us one thing in a picture, while someone else sees something entirely different in the same picture.

    Research scientists must be sure that the results of their work are not “illusory” in nature. They need to accurately report what “is,” rather than their general “impression” of “what is.” So, many times a scientist will repeat an experiment many times, or in different laboratories, to ensure that their results were valid. Science is only “good science” when anyone can repeat the experiment and get the same results.

    Other stuff you might like.
    Meet the Scientist!

    Scientists – who they are and what they do.


    Substance Abuse Treatment Program – Bronx, New York City – Montefiore Medical


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    Substance Abuse Treatment Program

    New Directions Recovery Center

    New Directions Recovery Center (aka New Directions) is an outpatient substance abuse treatment program that provides a wide range of supportive services to individuals aged 18 and older who are struggling with active substance use or who are at high risk for relapse. Our dedicated staff of counselors, psychologists, psychiatrists and medical providers work together closely to assist individuals to gain the skills they need to lead productive and drug/alcohol free lives. New Directions offers group and individual counseling, onsite psychological and psychiatric services as well as buprenorphine (Suboxone ) treatment for opioid dependence. We also provide intensive outpatient treatment, services in Spanish, and onsite vocational and nutritional counseling. In addition to our wide range of treatment groups, specialized support groups are available for men, women, Spanish-speakers and those in need of anger management.

    New Directions operates during the day and late afternoon to accommodate work and school schedules. We are conveniently located near the Burnside stop on the 4 train and near stops for the Bx40, Bx42 and Bx32 buses.

    Walk-in intakes are welcome Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 1pm. Intakes can also be scheduled by calling (917) 564-8780.

    New DirectionsRecovery Center
    2058 Jerome Avenue, Third Floor
    Bronx, NY 10453
    (917) 564-8780


    Dietetics – Food Science and Human Nutrition #dietetics,undergrad #program,college #of #human #sciences,food


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    Dietetics

    Dietitians are nutrition experts who strive for optimal health and nutrition of individuals and the population. The curriculum for the dietetics program as well as the diet and exercise program meet the academic requirements of the Didactic Program in Dietetics and prepares students for a career in the field of dietetics. The program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics, the accrediting agency for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

    Students enter the university designated as pre-dietetics students. During spring semester of the second year, interested students apply to the Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) by submitting the DPD Application to the program director by March 1.

    Admission to the program is based on overall GPA (3.0 or above required), completion of required coursework, and completion of the application with interest in becoming a registered dietitian. Students then progress toward earning a Bachelor of Science degree in dietetics and receive a verification statement upon graduation, which is needed to enter an accredited dietetics internship.

    Graduates are eligible to apply for admission to accredited dietetics internships/supervised practice programs. Upon successful completion of the experience program, graduates are eligible to take the national exam administered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration to become a registered dietitian (RD) / registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN).

    Accelerated Degree Option
    An accelerated degree option is available for the dietetics program.

    Read about career opportunities and salary information for registered dietitians. Graduates of the program are eligible to apply for admission to accredited dietetics internships/supervised practice programs. Upon successful completion of the experience program, graduates are eligible to take the national exam administered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration to become a registered dietitian (RD) / registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) and to practice in the field of dietetics. Learn more about becoming a dietitian .

    The Dietetics and Diet and Exercise programs are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics, the accrediting agency for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Graduates are eligible to apply for admission to accredited dietetics internships/supervised practice programs. Upon successful completion of the experience program, graduates are eligible to take the national exam to become a registered dietitian (RD) / registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN).

    Accreditation Status

    ISU s Didactic Program in Dietetics has been granted accreditation status by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics, the accrediting agency of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, 800/877-1600.

    Students are encouraged to develop leadership and professional skills and abilities through involvement in student organizations and other extra-curricular experiences. Work and volunteer hours are valuable for enhancing professional potential as well as study abroad experiences and Honors Program membership.

    Student organizations/clubs

    Professional associations/organizations

    Students are also encouraged to become student members of professional associations/organizations and network with professionals within the career field. Students may choose to become members of the following:


    American Universities #liberal #arts #and #sciences, #university, #humanities, #liberal #education, #college, #university


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    Index of American Universities

    As home pages are found for American Universities granting bachelor or advanced degrees, they are added here, one page per university. If you know of pages for universities not listed here, please drop me a line (see below). Some universities do not yet have home pages.

    If you have a question about this page, please see my Frequently Asked Questions page.

    A list that includes international universities is maintained by Mike Viron. A list of Canadian universities is maintained by Chris Redmond at Waterloo. A list of Community Colleges is maintained by the Maricopa Community College District.

    Search

    Select the first letter of the university:

    CLAS Navigation

    Contact

    Frequently Used Sites

    © University of Florida. Gainesville, FL 32611; (352) 392-3261.

    General Site Information

    This page was last updated Feb. 19, 2016.