Benton – Parker #parker #medical #associates


#

SAVE $$$ ON YOUR WORKERS COMPENSATION INSURANCE

Saving money on your Workers Compensation policy can be easy by implementing one common sense rule for any workplace by becoming a drug free workplace.

SO HOW CAN I SAVE ON MY WORKERS COMPENSATION?

Register to become a drug free workplace.

The State Board of Workers’ Compensation can certify employers as a drug-free workplace. Those certified receive a 5% to 7.5% reduction of their workers’ compensation premiums (reductions vary based on the state). Employers must submit a copy of their certificate each year to their Worker’s Compensation carrier in order to receive the discount.

FIVE EASY STEPS TO BECOMING CERTIFIED

  • Step 1: ESTABLISH A SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY
  • Step 2: COMPLETE TWO HOURS OF SUPERVISOR TRAINING
  • Step 3: COMPLETE TWO HOURS OF EMPLOYEE EDUCATION
  • Step 4: ESTABLISH TYPES OF TESTING MANDATED BY LAW
  • Step 5: CREATE AN EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

DISCOUNTS PER STATE

To Make a Claim – Find Your Company Below:

A – D

  • American Hallmark Insurance Company
    (877) 832-6642
  • American Inter-Fidelity Exchange
    800-876-1176
  • Amerisafe
    800-699-6240
  • Berkshire Hathaway Homestate Companies
    (800) 356-5750
  • Canal Insurance
    800-452-6911
  • Continental Western Insurance Company, a W. R. Berkley Company
    (866) 232-6724

E – H

  • Eastern Atlantic Insurance Company
  • Essex Insurance Company – Markel Essex
  • Grange Insurance Company
    (800) 445-3030
  • Great West Casulty Insurance
    800-228-8040
  • Hanover Insurance Group
    800-628-0250

I – N

  • Lancer Insurance
    800-521-6608
  • Maxum Specality Group
    800-598-6324
  • National Casualty Insurance Company
    800-423-7675 option 1
  • National Indemnity Insurance
    800-356-5750
  • National Interstate Insurance
    800-929-0870
  • Northland Insurance
    800-328-5972

O – Z

  • Occidental Fire and Casualty
    800.223.5994
  • Progressive Insurance
    1-800-PROGRESSIVE
  • Sentry Insurance
    1-800-373-6879
  • Travelers Insurance
    800-238-6225

To Make a Claim – Find Your Company Below:

A – D

E – H

  • Gateway Insurance Company
    800-852-7078
  • Gramercy Insurance Company
    866-278-7789
  • Grange Insurance Company
    (800) 445-3030
  • Great American Insurance Group
    800-643-7882
  • Great West Casulty Insurance
    800-228-8040
  • Hanover Insurance Group
    800-628-0250
  • Harleysville Insurance
    800-892-8877
  • The Hartford Insurance
    800-243-5860
  • Hudson Insurance Group
    800-542-2441

I – N

  • Insurance House
    Georgia – 800-446-9973
    North & South Carolina & Virginia – 866-268-8363 ext 4
  • Johnson & Johnson Insurance Group
    800-487-7565 ext 5024
  • Lancer Insurance
    800-521-6608
  • Maxum Specality Group
    >800-598-6324
  • Midwestern Insurance Alliance
    502-429-9990
  • National Indemnity Insurance
    800-356-5750
  • National Interstate Insurance
    800-929-0870
  • National Truck Underwriting Mangers, Inc
    800-929-0870
  • Northland Insurance
    800-328-5972

O – Z

  • Ohio Casulty
    866-255-5530
  • One Beacon Insurance
    877-248-3455
  • Penn-America Group
    800-788-4780
  • Progressive Insurance
    1-800-PROGRESSIVE
  • Sentry Insurance
    1-800-373-6879
  • Travelers Insurance
    800-238-6225
  • Universal Casulty Company
    847-700-9100
  • Vanliner Insurance Company
    800-325-3619
  • W.E. Love & Associates, Inc
    800-334-9123
  • Zurich Insurance
    888-680-8005

Stong Plumbing – Plumbers – Delaware County – Chester County PA #stong


#

Home Of The Guys In White!

Founded in 1947, Stong Plumbing is a customer focused plumbing and drain cleaning company. Locally based, we employ only highly trained individuals with a central goal to make our company the best service company in Delaware Valley and Chester County. Our entire company works hard to make your experience with us hassle-free and enjoyable.

From the professionalism of our expert technicians to the dedication of our office staff, we are committed to delivering you the best. We pledge to always tell you up-front what the cost will be to complete your job correctly. We make it a point to go over any details or limitations of the proposed systems so that you have a complete understanding of the steps needed to get to a positive end result.

This is why Stong Plumbing continues to grow, with more satisfied customers each and every year. Give us a call for your service needs, and see what you’ve been missing.

We cover all these areas: Aldan, Ardmore, Aston, Atglen, Avondale, Berwyn, Bethel Township, Birchrunville, Birmingham Township, Boothwyn, Brandamore, Brookhaven, Broomall, Bryn Mawr, Caln Township, Chadds Ford, Charlestown Township, Chatham, Chester, Chesterbrook, Chester Heights, Chester Springs, Cheyney, Clifton Heights, Coatesville, Cochranville, Collingdale, Colwyn, Concord Township, Concordville, Crum Lynne, Darby, Devault, Devon, Downingtown, Drexel Hill, East Bradford Township, East Brandywine Township, East Caln Township, East Coventry Township, East Fallowfield Township, East Goshen Township, East Lansdowne, East Marlborough Township, East Nantmeal Township, East Nottingham Township, East Pikeland Township, East Vincent Township, East Whiteland Township, Easttown Township, Eddystone, Edgemont, Elk Township, Elverson, Elwyn, Essington, Exton, Folcroft, Folsom, Franklin Township, Frazer, Gladwyne, Glendolden, Glen Mills, Glan Riddle, Glanmoore, Haverford, Haverford Township, Havertown, Highland Township, Holmes, Honey Brook, Immaculata, Kelton, Kemblesville, Kennett Square, Kimberton, Landenberg, Lansdowne, Lenni, Lewisville, Lima, Lincoln University, Linwood, Lionville, London Britian Township, London Grove Township, Londonderry Township, Lower Chichester Township, Lower Merion Township, Lyndell, Manoa, Malvern, Marcus Hook, Marple Township, Media, Mendenhall, Merion Station, Middletown Township, Millbourne, Modena, Morton, Moylan, Narberth, Neither Providence Township, New Garden Township, New London, Newlin Township, Newtown Square, North Coventry Township, Norwood, Nottingham, Oxford, Paoli, Parker Ford, Parkesburg, Parkside, Penn Township, Pennsbury Township, Phoenixville, Pocopson, Pomeroy, Primos, Prospect Park, Radnor, Ridley Park, Rosemont, Rose Valley, Rutledge, Sadsbury Township, Schuylkill Township, Secane, Sharon Hill, South Coatesville, South Coventry Township, Spring City, Springfield, St. Davids, St. Peters, Strafford, Suplee, Swarthmore, Thornbury Township, Thorndale, Thornton, Tinicum Township, Toughkenamon, Trainer, Tredyffrin Township, Unionville, Upland, Upper Chichester Township, Upper Darby, Upper Providence Township, Upper Uwchlan Township, Uwchlan Township, Uwchland, Valley Forge, Valley Township, Villanova, Wagontown, Wallace Township, Wallingford, Warwick Township, Wawa, Wayne, West Bradford Township, West Brandywine Township, West Caln Township, West Chester, West Followfield Township, West Goshen Township, West Grove, West Marlborough Township, West Nantmeal Township, West Pikeland Township, West Sadsbury Township, West Vincent Township, West Whiteland Township, Westtown, Willistown Township, Woodlyn, Wynnewood and Yeadon.


Rex Parker Does the NYT Crossword Puzzle #funny #questions #and #answers


#crossword puzzle answers

#

That revealer is a swing and a miss. Big miss. Terrible miss. THIS ROUND’S ON ME is a phrase. A fine phrase. A grid-spanning 15-letter phrase. THE ROUND’S ON ME is something the alien pretending to be a human might say. Also, it’s not an “offer,” as the clue seems to think. It’s a declaration. Further, the kinds of alcohol are pretty arbitrary, and only a few of them really fit the whole “this round’s on me” thing. A round of cognac? Really? Lastly, the shape is not, in fact, round. It’s octagonal. An interesting concept, totally botched in the execution. Don’t do this.

[from Letterman OMG that CD longbox!]

This played somewhat harder than normal for me (4:01) first because of the ludicrous revealer, and then because of several words I just didn’t know: GIMBAL (48A: Device that keeps a ship’s compass level). MASTIC, and GIRO (26D: Big name in bicycle helmets). That last one especially, hoo boy. Really stymied my eastword motion. I think my last letter was the “A” in GIMBAL. Might’ve been the “B” if I hadn’t already changed THE NET to THE WEB (29D: What Wi-Fi can connect you to). Had LAST LAP instead of LAST LEG (25A: Final part of a relay) and zero idea what a [Common name for a cowboy ] could be, despite having watched untold number of westerns. DESTRY Rides Again. I have no idea who this DUSTY guy is, to say nothing of his allegedly numerous namesakes. The lower part of the SW corner is a boatload of atrocious fill, and RETESTS abutting EAGEREST (!?) is also not great to look at. UNREAL is pretty good, as clued (2D: “That is SO incredible!” ), but the rest doesn’t have much going for it.

Signed, Rex Parker, King of CrossWorld

Monday, October 24, 2016

Constructor: John Guzzett a

Relative difficulty: On the easier side of Monda yness

THEME: MO RNING SHOW (58A: Brea kfast -time TV fare that usually incl udes the ends of 17-, 28, 36- and 44-Across) themers end with NEWS, TRAFFIC, WEATHER and SPORTS, respectively

Theme answers:

  • NEWPORT NEWS (17A: Virginia city known for its ship-building)
  • DRUG TRAFFIC (28A: Flow of narcotics)
  • UNDER THE WEATHER (36A: Not feeling so hot)
  • SPOIL SPORTS (44A: Killjoys)

Word of the Day: CUSPS (1A: Molars usually have four of these )
A cusp is a pointed, projecting, or elevated feature. In animals. it is usually used to refer to raised points on the crowns of teeth. (wikipedia)

This is a perfectly reasonable puzzle. from 30ish years ago that has somehow found its way to 2016. The NYT is having this problem over and over and over again lately. Problem isn’t (only) with the quality of the puzzle, it’s with the ambition level. No, “ambition” isn’t even the right word, since I don’t think a puzzle has to be super-edgy or complicated or avant-garde to be good. A very simple puzzle can be good. But there’s no attempt to be current or funny or, for lack of a better word, alive. We’re getting a ton of by-the-book puzzles. First words do this. Last words do this. Etc. With fill and clues that are less terrible than stale. Nobody expects That much from a Monday, but I think that’s actually a cruddy attitude to have towards Mondays and the people who make them well. A little zing, a little imagination, a little spark. This is all I ask of Mondays. Actually, it’s all I ask of most days. I won’t list all the tiresome fill here, largely because every puzzle has Some, but just look at the grid and consider how much of this stuff you see over and over and over. Even something like EMOTE or ORATE or SATED perfectly fine words, but relentless, and today, all in the same section. A puzzle made for people who wear AFTA and watch morning TV fare, i.e. not me. And, increasingly, not a lot of solvers. If it is unreasonable of me to keep asking the NYT to be the best, then maybe they should stop calling themselves the “best.” That way no fraud, no unrealistic expectations.

Turns out I don’t really know what CUSPS means. I finished this puzzle in under my normal Monday time, but I think I might’ve set a personal Monday best if I’d had some conception of CUSPS. I know the term “bicuspid,” but I think of “cusp” as meaning the edge; like. you’re on the *cusp* of something. Or in astrology, if you’re on the *cusp*, you are on the edge or boundary of two different signs. Right? Anyway, the clue [Molars usually have four of these ] totally stymied me. Filling in ROT at 4D: Drivel didn’t help (it’s PAP ). Also had lots o’ trouble with 5D: One often seen standing just out side a building’s entrance ( SMOKER ). since all I wanted was some version of “doorman.” So maybe it’s most accurate to say this puzzle had a Challenging (for a Monday) NW corner, and a hyper-easy everything else.

Bullets:

  • 50A: Shoe material ( LEATHER ) not that I care, but you don’t usually see replicated letter strings as long as the one this answer shares with WEATHER (in UNDER THE WEATHER )
  • 8D: “___ Gotta Be Me” (Sammy Davis Jr. song) ( I’VE ) not sure why I’VE sounds too formal / grammatical to precede “Gotta,” but it does. I GOTTA feels more natural. But a title’s a title’s a title.
  • 11D: Procedure for solving a mathematical problem ( ALGORITHM ) not to be confused with the theoretical concept AL GORE RHYTHM. P.S. I have a mathematician friend, who is also a constructor friend, who teaches in NEWPORT NEWS. Here’s the exciting proof.

Signed, Rex Parker, King of CrossWorld


Castle Rock Heating, Air Conditioning and Plumbing #castle #rock, #sedalia, #parker, #franktown,


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Heating | Air Conditioning | Plumbing in Douglas County, CO

Call 303-688-0597 or click here to set an appointment today!

Serving Castle Rock, Highlands Ranch, Franktown, Sedalia, Parker, Castle Pines, Castle Pines North, Larkspur and greater Douglas County!

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At Courtesy Plumbing and Heating we are dedicated to offering exceptional service in plumbing, heating and air conditioning with an emphasis on customer service and satisfaction. As members of the local community for 30 years, we treat every customer with the friendly, honest attention they deserve.

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Services


Rex Parker Does the NYT Crossword Puzzle #answer #questions.com


#crossword puzzle answers

#

That revealer is a swing and a miss. Big miss. Terrible miss. THIS ROUND’S ON ME is a phrase. A fine phrase. A grid-spanning 15-letter phrase. THE ROUND’S ON ME is something the alien pretending to be a human might say. Also, it’s not an “offer,” as the clue seems to think. It’s a declaration. Further, the kinds of alcohol are pretty arbitrary, and only a few of them really fit the whole “this round’s on me” thing. A round of cognac? Really? Lastly, the shape is not, in fact, round. It’s octagonal. An interesting concept, totally botched in the execution. Don’t do this.

[from Letterman OMG that CD longbox!]

This played somewhat harder than normal for me (4:01) first because of the ludicrous revealer, and then because of several words I just didn’t know: GIMBAL (48A: Device that keeps a ship’s compass level). MASTIC, and GIRO (26D: Big name in bicycle helmets). That last one especially, hoo boy. Really stymied my eastword motion. I think my last letter was the “A” in GIMBAL. Might’ve been the “B” if I hadn’t already changed THE NET to THE WEB (29D: What Wi-Fi can connect you to). Had LAST LAP instead of LAST LEG (25A: Final part of a relay) and zero idea what a [Common name for a cowboy ] could be, despite having watched untold number of westerns. DESTRY Rides Again. I have no idea who this DUSTY guy is, to say nothing of his allegedly numerous namesakes. The lower part of the SW corner is a boatload of atrocious fill, and RETESTS abutting EAGEREST (!?) is also not great to look at. UNREAL is pretty good, as clued (2D: “That is SO incredible!” ), but the rest doesn’t have much going for it.

Signed, Rex Parker, King of CrossWorld

Monday, October 24, 2016

Constructor: John Guzzett a

Relative difficulty: On the easier side of Monda yness

THEME: MO RNING SHOW (58A: Brea kfast -time TV fare that usually incl udes the ends of 17-, 28, 36- and 44-Across) themers end with NEWS, TRAFFIC, WEATHER and SPORTS, respectively

Theme answers:

  • NEWPORT NEWS (17A: Virginia city known for its ship-building)
  • DRUG TRAFFIC (28A: Flow of narcotics)
  • UNDER THE WEATHER (36A: Not feeling so hot)
  • SPOIL SPORTS (44A: Killjoys)

Word of the Day: CUSPS (1A: Molars usually have four of these )
A cusp is a pointed, projecting, or elevated feature. In animals. it is usually used to refer to raised points on the crowns of teeth. (wikipedia)

This is a perfectly reasonable puzzle. from 30ish years ago that has somehow found its way to 2016. The NYT is having this problem over and over and over again lately. Problem isn’t (only) with the quality of the puzzle, it’s with the ambition level. No, “ambition” isn’t even the right word, since I don’t think a puzzle has to be super-edgy or complicated or avant-garde to be good. A very simple puzzle can be good. But there’s no attempt to be current or funny or, for lack of a better word, alive. We’re getting a ton of by-the-book puzzles. First words do this. Last words do this. Etc. With fill and clues that are less terrible than stale. Nobody expects That much from a Monday, but I think that’s actually a cruddy attitude to have towards Mondays and the people who make them well. A little zing, a little imagination, a little spark. This is all I ask of Mondays. Actually, it’s all I ask of most days. I won’t list all the tiresome fill here, largely because every puzzle has Some, but just look at the grid and consider how much of this stuff you see over and over and over. Even something like EMOTE or ORATE or SATED perfectly fine words, but relentless, and today, all in the same section. A puzzle made for people who wear AFTA and watch morning TV fare, i.e. not me. And, increasingly, not a lot of solvers. If it is unreasonable of me to keep asking the NYT to be the best, then maybe they should stop calling themselves the “best.” That way no fraud, no unrealistic expectations.

Turns out I don’t really know what CUSPS means. I finished this puzzle in under my normal Monday time, but I think I might’ve set a personal Monday best if I’d had some conception of CUSPS. I know the term “bicuspid,” but I think of “cusp” as meaning the edge; like. you’re on the *cusp* of something. Or in astrology, if you’re on the *cusp*, you are on the edge or boundary of two different signs. Right? Anyway, the clue [Molars usually have four of these ] totally stymied me. Filling in ROT at 4D: Drivel didn’t help (it’s PAP ). Also had lots o’ trouble with 5D: One often seen standing just out side a building’s entrance ( SMOKER ). since all I wanted was some version of “doorman.” So maybe it’s most accurate to say this puzzle had a Challenging (for a Monday) NW corner, and a hyper-easy everything else.

Bullets:

  • 50A: Shoe material ( LEATHER ) not that I care, but you don’t usually see replicated letter strings as long as the one this answer shares with WEATHER (in UNDER THE WEATHER )
  • 8D: “___ Gotta Be Me” (Sammy Davis Jr. song) ( I’VE ) not sure why I’VE sounds too formal / grammatical to precede “Gotta,” but it does. I GOTTA feels more natural. But a title’s a title’s a title.
  • 11D: Procedure for solving a mathematical problem ( ALGORITHM ) not to be confused with the theoretical concept AL GORE RHYTHM. P.S. I have a mathematician friend, who is also a constructor friend, who teaches in NEWPORT NEWS. Here’s the exciting proof.

Signed, Rex Parker, King of CrossWorld


Rex Parker Does the NYT Crossword Puzzle #cryptic #clue #answers


#crossword puzzle answers

#

That revealer is a swing and a miss. Big miss. Terrible miss. THIS ROUND’S ON ME is a phrase. A fine phrase. A grid-spanning 15-letter phrase. THE ROUND’S ON ME is something the alien pretending to be a human might say. Also, it’s not an “offer,” as the clue seems to think. It’s a declaration. Further, the kinds of alcohol are pretty arbitrary, and only a few of them really fit the whole “this round’s on me” thing. A round of cognac? Really? Lastly, the shape is not, in fact, round. It’s octagonal. An interesting concept, totally botched in the execution. Don’t do this.

[from Letterman OMG that CD longbox!]

This played somewhat harder than normal for me (4:01) first because of the ludicrous revealer, and then because of several words I just didn’t know: GIMBAL (48A: Device that keeps a ship’s compass level). MASTIC, and GIRO (26D: Big name in bicycle helmets). That last one especially, hoo boy. Really stymied my eastword motion. I think my last letter was the “A” in GIMBAL. Might’ve been the “B” if I hadn’t already changed THE NET to THE WEB (29D: What Wi-Fi can connect you to). Had LAST LAP instead of LAST LEG (25A: Final part of a relay) and zero idea what a [Common name for a cowboy ] could be, despite having watched untold number of westerns. DESTRY Rides Again. I have no idea who this DUSTY guy is, to say nothing of his allegedly numerous namesakes. The lower part of the SW corner is a boatload of atrocious fill, and RETESTS abutting EAGEREST (!?) is also not great to look at. UNREAL is pretty good, as clued (2D: “That is SO incredible!” ), but the rest doesn’t have much going for it.

Signed, Rex Parker, King of CrossWorld

Monday, October 24, 2016

Constructor: John Guzzett a

Relative difficulty: On the easier side of Monda yness

THEME: MO RNING SHOW (58A: Brea kfast -time TV fare that usually incl udes the ends of 17-, 28, 36- and 44-Across) themers end with NEWS, TRAFFIC, WEATHER and SPORTS, respectively

Theme answers:

  • NEWPORT NEWS (17A: Virginia city known for its ship-building)
  • DRUG TRAFFIC (28A: Flow of narcotics)
  • UNDER THE WEATHER (36A: Not feeling so hot)
  • SPOIL SPORTS (44A: Killjoys)

Word of the Day: CUSPS (1A: Molars usually have four of these )
A cusp is a pointed, projecting, or elevated feature. In animals. it is usually used to refer to raised points on the crowns of teeth. (wikipedia)

This is a perfectly reasonable puzzle. from 30ish years ago that has somehow found its way to 2016. The NYT is having this problem over and over and over again lately. Problem isn’t (only) with the quality of the puzzle, it’s with the ambition level. No, “ambition” isn’t even the right word, since I don’t think a puzzle has to be super-edgy or complicated or avant-garde to be good. A very simple puzzle can be good. But there’s no attempt to be current or funny or, for lack of a better word, alive. We’re getting a ton of by-the-book puzzles. First words do this. Last words do this. Etc. With fill and clues that are less terrible than stale. Nobody expects That much from a Monday, but I think that’s actually a cruddy attitude to have towards Mondays and the people who make them well. A little zing, a little imagination, a little spark. This is all I ask of Mondays. Actually, it’s all I ask of most days. I won’t list all the tiresome fill here, largely because every puzzle has Some, but just look at the grid and consider how much of this stuff you see over and over and over. Even something like EMOTE or ORATE or SATED perfectly fine words, but relentless, and today, all in the same section. A puzzle made for people who wear AFTA and watch morning TV fare, i.e. not me. And, increasingly, not a lot of solvers. If it is unreasonable of me to keep asking the NYT to be the best, then maybe they should stop calling themselves the “best.” That way no fraud, no unrealistic expectations.

Turns out I don’t really know what CUSPS means. I finished this puzzle in under my normal Monday time, but I think I might’ve set a personal Monday best if I’d had some conception of CUSPS. I know the term “bicuspid,” but I think of “cusp” as meaning the edge; like. you’re on the *cusp* of something. Or in astrology, if you’re on the *cusp*, you are on the edge or boundary of two different signs. Right? Anyway, the clue [Molars usually have four of these ] totally stymied me. Filling in ROT at 4D: Drivel didn’t help (it’s PAP ). Also had lots o’ trouble with 5D: One often seen standing just out side a building’s entrance ( SMOKER ). since all I wanted was some version of “doorman.” So maybe it’s most accurate to say this puzzle had a Challenging (for a Monday) NW corner, and a hyper-easy everything else.

Bullets:

  • 50A: Shoe material ( LEATHER ) not that I care, but you don’t usually see replicated letter strings as long as the one this answer shares with WEATHER (in UNDER THE WEATHER )
  • 8D: “___ Gotta Be Me” (Sammy Davis Jr. song) ( I’VE ) not sure why I’VE sounds too formal / grammatical to precede “Gotta,” but it does. I GOTTA feels more natural. But a title’s a title’s a title.
  • 11D: Procedure for solving a mathematical problem ( ALGORITHM ) not to be confused with the theoretical concept AL GORE RHYTHM. P.S. I have a mathematician friend, who is also a constructor friend, who teaches in NEWPORT NEWS. Here’s the exciting proof.

Signed, Rex Parker, King of CrossWorld


Rex Parker Does the NYT Crossword Puzzle #free #homework #answers


#crossword puzzle answers

#

That revealer is a swing and a miss. Big miss. Terrible miss. THIS ROUND’S ON ME is a phrase. A fine phrase. A grid-spanning 15-letter phrase. THE ROUND’S ON ME is something the alien pretending to be a human might say. Also, it’s not an “offer,” as the clue seems to think. It’s a declaration. Further, the kinds of alcohol are pretty arbitrary, and only a few of them really fit the whole “this round’s on me” thing. A round of cognac? Really? Lastly, the shape is not, in fact, round. It’s octagonal. An interesting concept, totally botched in the execution. Don’t do this.

[from Letterman OMG that CD longbox!]

This played somewhat harder than normal for me (4:01) first because of the ludicrous revealer, and then because of several words I just didn’t know: GIMBAL (48A: Device that keeps a ship’s compass level). MASTIC, and GIRO (26D: Big name in bicycle helmets). That last one especially, hoo boy. Really stymied my eastword motion. I think my last letter was the “A” in GIMBAL. Might’ve been the “B” if I hadn’t already changed THE NET to THE WEB (29D: What Wi-Fi can connect you to). Had LAST LAP instead of LAST LEG (25A: Final part of a relay) and zero idea what a [Common name for a cowboy ] could be, despite having watched untold number of westerns. DESTRY Rides Again. I have no idea who this DUSTY guy is, to say nothing of his allegedly numerous namesakes. The lower part of the SW corner is a boatload of atrocious fill, and RETESTS abutting EAGEREST (!?) is also not great to look at. UNREAL is pretty good, as clued (2D: “That is SO incredible!” ), but the rest doesn’t have much going for it.

Signed, Rex Parker, King of CrossWorld

Monday, October 24, 2016

Constructor: John Guzzett a

Relative difficulty: On the easier side of Monda yness

THEME: MO RNING SHOW (58A: Brea kfast -time TV fare that usually incl udes the ends of 17-, 28, 36- and 44-Across) themers end with NEWS, TRAFFIC, WEATHER and SPORTS, respectively

Theme answers:

  • NEWPORT NEWS (17A: Virginia city known for its ship-building)
  • DRUG TRAFFIC (28A: Flow of narcotics)
  • UNDER THE WEATHER (36A: Not feeling so hot)
  • SPOIL SPORTS (44A: Killjoys)

Word of the Day: CUSPS (1A: Molars usually have four of these )
A cusp is a pointed, projecting, or elevated feature. In animals. it is usually used to refer to raised points on the crowns of teeth. (wikipedia)

This is a perfectly reasonable puzzle. from 30ish years ago that has somehow found its way to 2016. The NYT is having this problem over and over and over again lately. Problem isn’t (only) with the quality of the puzzle, it’s with the ambition level. No, “ambition” isn’t even the right word, since I don’t think a puzzle has to be super-edgy or complicated or avant-garde to be good. A very simple puzzle can be good. But there’s no attempt to be current or funny or, for lack of a better word, alive. We’re getting a ton of by-the-book puzzles. First words do this. Last words do this. Etc. With fill and clues that are less terrible than stale. Nobody expects That much from a Monday, but I think that’s actually a cruddy attitude to have towards Mondays and the people who make them well. A little zing, a little imagination, a little spark. This is all I ask of Mondays. Actually, it’s all I ask of most days. I won’t list all the tiresome fill here, largely because every puzzle has Some, but just look at the grid and consider how much of this stuff you see over and over and over. Even something like EMOTE or ORATE or SATED perfectly fine words, but relentless, and today, all in the same section. A puzzle made for people who wear AFTA and watch morning TV fare, i.e. not me. And, increasingly, not a lot of solvers. If it is unreasonable of me to keep asking the NYT to be the best, then maybe they should stop calling themselves the “best.” That way no fraud, no unrealistic expectations.

Turns out I don’t really know what CUSPS means. I finished this puzzle in under my normal Monday time, but I think I might’ve set a personal Monday best if I’d had some conception of CUSPS. I know the term “bicuspid,” but I think of “cusp” as meaning the edge; like. you’re on the *cusp* of something. Or in astrology, if you’re on the *cusp*, you are on the edge or boundary of two different signs. Right? Anyway, the clue [Molars usually have four of these ] totally stymied me. Filling in ROT at 4D: Drivel didn’t help (it’s PAP ). Also had lots o’ trouble with 5D: One often seen standing just out side a building’s entrance ( SMOKER ). since all I wanted was some version of “doorman.” So maybe it’s most accurate to say this puzzle had a Challenging (for a Monday) NW corner, and a hyper-easy everything else.

Bullets:

  • 50A: Shoe material ( LEATHER ) not that I care, but you don’t usually see replicated letter strings as long as the one this answer shares with WEATHER (in UNDER THE WEATHER )
  • 8D: “___ Gotta Be Me” (Sammy Davis Jr. song) ( I’VE ) not sure why I’VE sounds too formal / grammatical to precede “Gotta,” but it does. I GOTTA feels more natural. But a title’s a title’s a title.
  • 11D: Procedure for solving a mathematical problem ( ALGORITHM ) not to be confused with the theoretical concept AL GORE RHYTHM. P.S. I have a mathematician friend, who is also a constructor friend, who teaches in NEWPORT NEWS. Here’s the exciting proof.

Signed, Rex Parker, King of CrossWorld


Rex Parker Does the NYT Crossword Puzzle #bible #questions #answers


#crossword puzzle answers

#

That revealer is a swing and a miss. Big miss. Terrible miss. THIS ROUND’S ON ME is a phrase. A fine phrase. A grid-spanning 15-letter phrase. THE ROUND’S ON ME is something the alien pretending to be a human might say. Also, it’s not an “offer,” as the clue seems to think. It’s a declaration. Further, the kinds of alcohol are pretty arbitrary, and only a few of them really fit the whole “this round’s on me” thing. A round of cognac? Really? Lastly, the shape is not, in fact, round. It’s octagonal. An interesting concept, totally botched in the execution. Don’t do this.

[from Letterman OMG that CD longbox!]

This played somewhat harder than normal for me (4:01) first because of the ludicrous revealer, and then because of several words I just didn’t know: GIMBAL (48A: Device that keeps a ship’s compass level). MASTIC, and GIRO (26D: Big name in bicycle helmets). That last one especially, hoo boy. Really stymied my eastword motion. I think my last letter was the “A” in GIMBAL. Might’ve been the “B” if I hadn’t already changed THE NET to THE WEB (29D: What Wi-Fi can connect you to). Had LAST LAP instead of LAST LEG (25A: Final part of a relay) and zero idea what a [Common name for a cowboy ] could be, despite having watched untold number of westerns. DESTRY Rides Again. I have no idea who this DUSTY guy is, to say nothing of his allegedly numerous namesakes. The lower part of the SW corner is a boatload of atrocious fill, and RETESTS abutting EAGEREST (!?) is also not great to look at. UNREAL is pretty good, as clued (2D: “That is SO incredible!” ), but the rest doesn’t have much going for it.

Signed, Rex Parker, King of CrossWorld

Monday, October 24, 2016

Constructor: John Guzzett a

Relative difficulty: On the easier side of Monda yness

THEME: MO RNING SHOW (58A: Brea kfast -time TV fare that usually incl udes the ends of 17-, 28, 36- and 44-Across) themers end with NEWS, TRAFFIC, WEATHER and SPORTS, respectively

Theme answers:

  • NEWPORT NEWS (17A: Virginia city known for its ship-building)
  • DRUG TRAFFIC (28A: Flow of narcotics)
  • UNDER THE WEATHER (36A: Not feeling so hot)
  • SPOIL SPORTS (44A: Killjoys)

Word of the Day: CUSPS (1A: Molars usually have four of these )
A cusp is a pointed, projecting, or elevated feature. In animals. it is usually used to refer to raised points on the crowns of teeth. (wikipedia)

This is a perfectly reasonable puzzle. from 30ish years ago that has somehow found its way to 2016. The NYT is having this problem over and over and over again lately. Problem isn’t (only) with the quality of the puzzle, it’s with the ambition level. No, “ambition” isn’t even the right word, since I don’t think a puzzle has to be super-edgy or complicated or avant-garde to be good. A very simple puzzle can be good. But there’s no attempt to be current or funny or, for lack of a better word, alive. We’re getting a ton of by-the-book puzzles. First words do this. Last words do this. Etc. With fill and clues that are less terrible than stale. Nobody expects That much from a Monday, but I think that’s actually a cruddy attitude to have towards Mondays and the people who make them well. A little zing, a little imagination, a little spark. This is all I ask of Mondays. Actually, it’s all I ask of most days. I won’t list all the tiresome fill here, largely because every puzzle has Some, but just look at the grid and consider how much of this stuff you see over and over and over. Even something like EMOTE or ORATE or SATED perfectly fine words, but relentless, and today, all in the same section. A puzzle made for people who wear AFTA and watch morning TV fare, i.e. not me. And, increasingly, not a lot of solvers. If it is unreasonable of me to keep asking the NYT to be the best, then maybe they should stop calling themselves the “best.” That way no fraud, no unrealistic expectations.

Turns out I don’t really know what CUSPS means. I finished this puzzle in under my normal Monday time, but I think I might’ve set a personal Monday best if I’d had some conception of CUSPS. I know the term “bicuspid,” but I think of “cusp” as meaning the edge; like. you’re on the *cusp* of something. Or in astrology, if you’re on the *cusp*, you are on the edge or boundary of two different signs. Right? Anyway, the clue [Molars usually have four of these ] totally stymied me. Filling in ROT at 4D: Drivel didn’t help (it’s PAP ). Also had lots o’ trouble with 5D: One often seen standing just out side a building’s entrance ( SMOKER ). since all I wanted was some version of “doorman.” So maybe it’s most accurate to say this puzzle had a Challenging (for a Monday) NW corner, and a hyper-easy everything else.

Bullets:

  • 50A: Shoe material ( LEATHER ) not that I care, but you don’t usually see replicated letter strings as long as the one this answer shares with WEATHER (in UNDER THE WEATHER )
  • 8D: “___ Gotta Be Me” (Sammy Davis Jr. song) ( I’VE ) not sure why I’VE sounds too formal / grammatical to precede “Gotta,” but it does. I GOTTA feels more natural. But a title’s a title’s a title.
  • 11D: Procedure for solving a mathematical problem ( ALGORITHM ) not to be confused with the theoretical concept AL GORE RHYTHM. P.S. I have a mathematician friend, who is also a constructor friend, who teaches in NEWPORT NEWS. Here’s the exciting proof.

Signed, Rex Parker, King of CrossWorld


Rex Parker Does the NYT Crossword Puzzle #call #answering


#crossword puzzle answers

#

That revealer is a swing and a miss. Big miss. Terrible miss. THIS ROUND’S ON ME is a phrase. A fine phrase. A grid-spanning 15-letter phrase. THE ROUND’S ON ME is something the alien pretending to be a human might say. Also, it’s not an “offer,” as the clue seems to think. It’s a declaration. Further, the kinds of alcohol are pretty arbitrary, and only a few of them really fit the whole “this round’s on me” thing. A round of cognac? Really? Lastly, the shape is not, in fact, round. It’s octagonal. An interesting concept, totally botched in the execution. Don’t do this.

[from Letterman OMG that CD longbox!]

This played somewhat harder than normal for me (4:01) first because of the ludicrous revealer, and then because of several words I just didn’t know: GIMBAL (48A: Device that keeps a ship’s compass level). MASTIC, and GIRO (26D: Big name in bicycle helmets). That last one especially, hoo boy. Really stymied my eastword motion. I think my last letter was the “A” in GIMBAL. Might’ve been the “B” if I hadn’t already changed THE NET to THE WEB (29D: What Wi-Fi can connect you to). Had LAST LAP instead of LAST LEG (25A: Final part of a relay) and zero idea what a [Common name for a cowboy ] could be, despite having watched untold number of westerns. DESTRY Rides Again. I have no idea who this DUSTY guy is, to say nothing of his allegedly numerous namesakes. The lower part of the SW corner is a boatload of atrocious fill, and RETESTS abutting EAGEREST (!?) is also not great to look at. UNREAL is pretty good, as clued (2D: “That is SO incredible!” ), but the rest doesn’t have much going for it.

Signed, Rex Parker, King of CrossWorld

Monday, October 24, 2016

Constructor: John Guzzett a

Relative difficulty: On the easier side of Monda yness

THEME: MO RNING SHOW (58A: Brea kfast -time TV fare that usually incl udes the ends of 17-, 28, 36- and 44-Across) themers end with NEWS, TRAFFIC, WEATHER and SPORTS, respectively

Theme answers:

  • NEWPORT NEWS (17A: Virginia city known for its ship-building)
  • DRUG TRAFFIC (28A: Flow of narcotics)
  • UNDER THE WEATHER (36A: Not feeling so hot)
  • SPOIL SPORTS (44A: Killjoys)

Word of the Day: CUSPS (1A: Molars usually have four of these )
A cusp is a pointed, projecting, or elevated feature. In animals. it is usually used to refer to raised points on the crowns of teeth. (wikipedia)

This is a perfectly reasonable puzzle. from 30ish years ago that has somehow found its way to 2016. The NYT is having this problem over and over and over again lately. Problem isn’t (only) with the quality of the puzzle, it’s with the ambition level. No, “ambition” isn’t even the right word, since I don’t think a puzzle has to be super-edgy or complicated or avant-garde to be good. A very simple puzzle can be good. But there’s no attempt to be current or funny or, for lack of a better word, alive. We’re getting a ton of by-the-book puzzles. First words do this. Last words do this. Etc. With fill and clues that are less terrible than stale. Nobody expects That much from a Monday, but I think that’s actually a cruddy attitude to have towards Mondays and the people who make them well. A little zing, a little imagination, a little spark. This is all I ask of Mondays. Actually, it’s all I ask of most days. I won’t list all the tiresome fill here, largely because every puzzle has Some, but just look at the grid and consider how much of this stuff you see over and over and over. Even something like EMOTE or ORATE or SATED perfectly fine words, but relentless, and today, all in the same section. A puzzle made for people who wear AFTA and watch morning TV fare, i.e. not me. And, increasingly, not a lot of solvers. If it is unreasonable of me to keep asking the NYT to be the best, then maybe they should stop calling themselves the “best.” That way no fraud, no unrealistic expectations.

Turns out I don’t really know what CUSPS means. I finished this puzzle in under my normal Monday time, but I think I might’ve set a personal Monday best if I’d had some conception of CUSPS. I know the term “bicuspid,” but I think of “cusp” as meaning the edge; like. you’re on the *cusp* of something. Or in astrology, if you’re on the *cusp*, you are on the edge or boundary of two different signs. Right? Anyway, the clue [Molars usually have four of these ] totally stymied me. Filling in ROT at 4D: Drivel didn’t help (it’s PAP ). Also had lots o’ trouble with 5D: One often seen standing just out side a building’s entrance ( SMOKER ). since all I wanted was some version of “doorman.” So maybe it’s most accurate to say this puzzle had a Challenging (for a Monday) NW corner, and a hyper-easy everything else.

Bullets:

  • 50A: Shoe material ( LEATHER ) not that I care, but you don’t usually see replicated letter strings as long as the one this answer shares with WEATHER (in UNDER THE WEATHER )
  • 8D: “___ Gotta Be Me” (Sammy Davis Jr. song) ( I’VE ) not sure why I’VE sounds too formal / grammatical to precede “Gotta,” but it does. I GOTTA feels more natural. But a title’s a title’s a title.
  • 11D: Procedure for solving a mathematical problem ( ALGORITHM ) not to be confused with the theoretical concept AL GORE RHYTHM. P.S. I have a mathematician friend, who is also a constructor friend, who teaches in NEWPORT NEWS. Here’s the exciting proof.

Signed, Rex Parker, King of CrossWorld