Beginners – Reading Page, ESL Lounge, true or false answers.#True #or #false


Beginners – reading

Simple, short reading text which can be used in many ways: speaking comprehension, written comprehension, interview roleplay, dictation race, etc, etc.

After reading the ‘My Name Is Ben’ text, students can answer these true/false reading comprehension questions.

After reading the ‘My Name Is Ben’ text, students can do this open reading comprehension question exercise.

True or false answers

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Short beginners level reading text. See below for associated exercises that can be done with this.

Multiple choice questions to go with the ‘The Town Of Clarkson’ reading text.

True or false questions to go with the ‘The Town Of Clarkson’ reading text.

Worksheet which gets students forming questions based on the ‘The Town Of Clarkson’ reading text.

Basic, short reading text. Can be used for comprehension or just as a prompt for students to discuss their own routines.

After reading the ‘Tom’s Day’ text, students complete a true/false comprehension questions worksheet.

After reading the ‘Tom’s Day’ text, students form questions based on the information in the text.

A short text about a journalist, his wife and their three children. Focus on different present forms of the verb ‘have’.

A worksheet that gets students to write questions in the present simple based on the ‘The Seattle Journalist’ reading. Focuses on have/has.

A worksheet that gets students to write short answers to questions based on the ‘The Seattle Journalist’ reading.

Another reading text that can be used in similar ways to the previous one. This one focuses more on daily routine.

After reading the ‘My Name Is Ben’ text, students can answer these true/false reading comprehension questions.

After reading the ‘My Working Day’ text, students form questions based on the information in the text.

A dialogue to read. Tom calls his local swimming pool to ask for information.

After reading the ‘Barnton Swimming Pool’ text, students can answer these true/false reading comprehension questions.

Students read about a garden.

Reading comprehension worksheet where students need to use one word to complete each sentence about the “My Garden” reading text.

True or false answers


True or False Trivia and Quizzes, true or false answers.#True #or #false


True or False Trivia and Quizzes

True or false answers

Tough , 15 Qns, Inquizition, Jan 12 09

Tough , 15 Qns, Inquizition, Feb 13 09

Tough , 15 Qns, Inquizition, Oct 23 08

Tough , 15 Qns, Inquizition, Aug 17 08

Tough , 25 Qns, timence, Apr 17 02

timence True or false answers

Average , 10 Qns, kyleisalive, Mar 15 16

kyleisalive True or false answers

Average , 10 Qns, Inquizition, Mar 02 12

Average , 10 Qns, timence, Nov 09 13

timence True or false answers

Tough , 10 Qns, onua9159, Apr 09 07

Tough , 25 Qns, timence, Jun 26 02

timence True or false answers

Average , 10 Qns, Inquizition, Apr 21 11

Average , 10 Qns, timence, Apr 28 13

timence True or false answers

Tough , 25 Qns, tigey, Jul 03 04

Tough , 20 Qns, tigey, Mar 28 07

Tough , 10 Qns, crisw, May 24 04

crisw True or false answers

Tough , 20 Qns, justawful, May 28 05

Tough , 10 Qns, Tizzabelle, Jan 20 15

Tizzabelle True or false answers

Tough , 10 Qns, lompocjoe, Jun 28 07

Average , 15 Qns, wilbill, Nov 03 14

wilbill True or false answers

Tough , 15 Qns, sunfloweruk23, Apr 16 03

Average , 10 Qns, Inquizition, Feb 04 11

Tough , 10 Qns, Inquizition, Jun 10 12

Tough , 15 Qns, cag1970, Mar 02 07

Tough , 10 Qns, vogon, Mar 04 06

Average , 10 Qns, Inquizition, Mar 27 12

Tough , 10 Qns, Inquizition, Jan 02 13

Average , 10 Qns, Creedy, Nov 30 12

Creedy True or false answers

Tough , 15 Qns, cag1970, Feb 17 05

Average , 10 Qns, salami_swami, Aug 04 11

salami_swami True or false answers

Average , 10 Qns, Linkan, Oct 05 03

Linkan True or false answers

Last Updated Nov 18 17 5:44 AM

True or false answers= Editor’s Pick True or false answers= FunTrivia Editor True or false answers= Gold Member

Teachers / educators: FunTrivia welcomes the use of our website and quizzes in the classroom as a teaching aid or for preparing and testing students. See our education page.

All questions, answers, and quiz content on this website is copyright FunTrivia.


How to discern True Christianity from False Doctrine, true or false answers.#True


A Bible Study & True Christianity

How to discern True Christianity from False Doctrine

True or false answers

True or false answers

2. True Christianity will be rejected by the vast majority. This has always been the case throughout history. In Noah’s time only 8 people were saved in the whole world. In Lot’s time only Lot and his family were saved in two cities. The Bible says that our time will be similar to Noah and Lot’s time so it is very likely that the percentage of people saved could be similar.

3. True Christianity will be considered radical by most people. Jesus, the apostles and the prophets were considered radical. The Bible says that Christians are a peculiar people.

4. True Christianity will boldly rebuke and hate evil to such a large extent that those who preach the truth will greatly upset those who are evil. Those who preach truth will suffer persecution as a result.

5. True Christianity will be controversial and cause divisions (Luke 12: 51,52). To cause these divisions major change would have to occur in someone’s life which would upset others.

6. True Christianity will testify that almost everything that almost everyone does is evil.

7. True Christianity will be about true love, which is sharing and caring for others, where the main focus is to proclaim or aid the proclamation of the Gospel.

8. True Christianity will not be conformed to the world by accepting or desiring materialism, money and commercialism as a good thing or a part of life.

9. True Christianity will not be able to be proved wrong, although people may appear to make it sound untrue by arguing against it by using false statements.

10. True Christianity will not be deceptive or misleading or cause people to believe a lie. It will be about honesty and truth. People today are saying misleading things such as that the church is fine. They say that people are getting healed everywhere and saying that they are healed when they are not. This could be compared to a dishonest salesman who says something is great when it does not work in order to get people to accept their product or system.

11. True Christianity is positive about good things and doing God’s will, but it hates evil. It is not like the mainstream that is positive about many evil things. Saying that something evil is good is only leading people to do evil. Many people say that things are fine and that many people are being saved and doing God’s will when this is not true. This is only suppressing the fact that the world is almost totally evil and causing people not to repent.

12. True Christianity has the fruits of commitment to doing God’s will and it will follow the historical example of those who did God’s will such as Jesus, the Apostles and the Prophets. Using your time and money to do God’s will is the purpose of life. The majority don’t do God’s will by working for the corrupt system or spending their money and time on unnecessary things.

Where does this leave the mainstream Church and the millions of people who think they are Christians. Although the mainstream churches have a lot of true Bible teaching, it appears that they probably will not fit into the category of the minority of saved believers. Therefore, they may be rejected and considered lukewarm if they don’t repent.

The Bible promises that God will help His chosen people who obey Him by answering their prayers and leading them. However, curses are promised to people that disobey God. (Duet 28). Obedient people should therefore receive a greater percentage of desirable outcomes and a lower percentage of undesirable outcomes than the ungodly. God should help His people to think or work more efficiently, remember better, make the correct decisions, and find what they need with less frustrating problems, inconveniences or accidents than unbelievers. Please let me know if you know of anyone who can produce the evidence that they are obviously led and helped by God so that the result cannot be explained by imagination and the laws of probability. I know that the Bible promises trials and persecution, but it indicates that there should be divine help as well, as explained at truechristianity.com .

There are many debatable doctrines that I am not sure of. However, I am willing to believe and practice them if someone can show me and produce the evidence that these doctrines are what God really wants us to believe. If someone is obviously led and helped by God as explained in the previous paragraph, there would be a good chance that their beliefs would be fully correct. We are yet to meet anyone who can produce the evidence that God is pleased with them and helping them.


IELTS True False Not Given Reading Lesson, true or false answers.#True #or


true or false answers

IELTS True False Not Given

This lesson explains how to answer True False Not Given questions for IELTS.

Firsly, you will be presented with a list of facts. You then have to look at the text in order to decide if the facts are true, false, or not given.

Below are some tips and strategies to help you answer this type of question.

  • If the fact you are given is clearly in the reading it is True
  • If the reading says the opposite of the fact you’ve been given it is False
  • If it is not true or false, it is Not Given

Strategies to answer the questions

  • The questions follow the order of the text.
  • Read the question carefully to make sure you fully understand what it is saying.
  • Scan the text to find where the answer is using key words from the question
  • When you find where the answer is, read the textcarefully to identify if you think it is T, F or NG.
  • The questions will probably use synonyms rather than the words in the text.
  • Look out for controlling words such as “only”, “all’, “never” etc. For example, if the fact in the question says ‘some’ and the fact in the text says ‘all’, then it is F.
  • Do not spend a long time looking for the answer to one question; it is probably NG, if you cannot find it.
  • Make sure you use the correct code; ‘Yes’, ‘No’, ‘No Information’ is sometimes used (these question are slightly different and you look for opinions rather than facts).

Example

Look at this statment, taken from the first sentence in the reading below:

Chiles originate in South America and have been eaten for at least 9,500 years.

Here are some example IELTS True False Not Given statements with answers:

  1. Chiles come from South America – True
  2. People began eating Chiles in the last few centuries – False
  3. South Americans were the first people to start eating Chiles – Not Given

Number one is clearly true. Notice the use of the synonym ‘come from‘ used instead of ‘originates‘. It is common to use different words.

Two is clearly false as it was 9,500 years ago, not a few 100 years ago.

Three is not in the text. Be careful about making assumptions then thinking it is true. It is quite probable that South Americans began eating Chiles first as they originated there; however, you can’t be sure of that and the text does not tell you that.

IELTS True False Not Given – Practice

Now, read the following text and answer the questions to the right of the reading using the drop down menu to choose either True, False, or Not Given.

[Please note that if you are on a mobile device the questions can be found in ‘navigation’ or by scrolling down to the bottom]

An explanation of the answers is provided below.

Do the following statements agree with the information in the text? Mark them:

True if the statement agrees with the text

False if the statement does not agree with the text

Not Given if there is no information about this in the text

Chilies

Chilies originate in South America and have been eaten for at least 9,500 years. Organised cultivation began around 5,400 BC. Christopher Columbus was the first European to encounter chilies, when he landed on the island of Hispaniola in 1492. He thought it was a type of pepper and called it the “red pepper”, a name still used today. After their introduction to Europe they were an immediate sensation and were quickly incorporated into the diet. From there they spread to Africa, India and East Asia.

The reason for the chili’s “hotness” lies in a chemical called Capsaisin. Capsaisin causes temporary irritation to the trigeminal cells, which are the pain receptors in the mouth, nose and throat. After the pain messages are transmitted to the brain, endorphins, natural pain killers, are released and these not only kill the pain but give the chili eater a short lived natural high. Other side effects include: an increased heart rate, a running nose and increased salivation and sweating, which can have a cooling effect in hot climates.

The reason for the presence of Capsaisin is thought to be to deter animals from eating the fruit. Only mammals feel the burning effects; birds feel nothing. As birds are a better method of distributing the seeds, which pass intact through their guts, Capsaisin would seem to be a result of natural selection.

The smaller chilies tend to be the hottest. This may reflect the fact that they tend to grow closer to the ground and are therefore more vulnerable to animals. The heat of a chili is measured on the Scoville scale. The hottest types such as the Habenero and the Scotch Bonnet rate between 100,000 and 300,000, the world famous Tabasco sauceГ’ rates at 15,000 to 30,000, about the same as the Thai prik khee nu, while the popular Jalapeno is between 5,000 and 15,000. Powdered chili is 500 to 1,000 and the mild capsicins and paprikas can range between 100 and 0.

IELTS True False Not Given – Answers Discussion

Chilies became popular as soon as they were brought into Europe – True

After their introduction to Europe they were an immediate sensation and were quickly incorporated into the diet.

There two statements are clearly saying the same thing. Notice the use of synomyms:

Became popular = sensation

As soon as = immediately

Brought into = introduced

Capsaisin causes significant damage to the mouth. – False

Capsaisin causes temporary irritation the trigeminal cells.

This is false as the statement says ‘significant damage‘. This is not the same as a ‘temporary irritation‘.

Chilies can be part of a birds diet – True

Only mammals feel the burning effects; birds feel nothing. As birds are a better method of distributing the seeds, which pass intact through their guts

This is true as this section in the reading clearly tells us birds feel nothing (when they eat them) and they distribute them around when it leaves their body. So clearly chilies are eaten by birds. In other words, they can be a part of a birds diet.

All large chilies grow high off the ground – Not Given

The smaller chilies tend to be the hottest. This may reflect the fact that they tend to grow closer to the ground and are therefore more vulnerable to animals.

We are told here that small chilies grow closer to the ground. It can be assumed then that many of the large ones are higher off the ground.

However, it says ‘ all large chilies‘. We are not given any information to say all of them grow high off the ground. It’s possible some don’t, so we don’t know which means it is Not Given.

People breed chilies for their heat – Not Given

The heat of a chili is measured on the Scoville scale.

Again, this is Not Given. We are given some information about heat in this sentence and those that follow.

But these are just descriptions about how they are hot. We are not told specifically that this is the reason they are breeding them.


Personality dictionary definition, personality defined, true or false answers.#True #or #false #answers


personality

True or false answers

True or false answers

Ethan’s friends say that he has a laid back, happy-go-lucky personality.

An example of personality is charismatic.

personality

True or false answers

pl. – ties

  1. Archaic the quality or fact of being a person; personhood
  2. Archaic the quality or fact of being a particular person; personal identity; individuality
    1. qualities of any individual as expressed by attitudes and physical and mental activities; distinctive individual qualities of a person, considered collectively
    2. the complex of qualities and characteristics seen as being distinctive to a group, nation, place, etc.
    1. the sum of such qualities seen as being capable of making, or likely to make, a favorable impression on other people
    2. Informal personal attractiveness; engaging manner or qualities
  3. a person; specif.,
    1. a notable person; personage
    2. a person known for appearances on TV, radio, etc.
  4. [pl.] remarks, usually of an offensive or disparaging nature, aimed at or referring to a person

Origin of personality

Middle English personalite from Late Latin personalitas from personalis, personal

personality

True or false answers

Origin of personality

personality

True or false answers

  1. A set of qualities that make a person (thing) distinct from another. The president has a unique personality.
  2. An assumed role or manner of behavior. My work PC emulates a Windows personality.In his final act, the comedian takes on a child’s personality.
  3. A celebrity. Johnny Carson was a respected television personality.
  4. Charisma, or qualities that make a person stand out from the crowd. The best contestant shows most personality.
  5. Something said or written which refers to the person, conduct, etc., of some individual, especially something of a disparaging or offensive nature; personal remarks. indulgence in personalities
  6. (law) That quality of a law which concerns the condition, state, and capacity of persons.

Coined between 1350 and 1400 from Middle English personalite, from Middle French, from Late Latin persōnālitās.


How Do I Make a True or False Quiz, true or false


How Do I Make a True or False Quiz?

True or false answers

True or false questions are well-suited to test recall or comprehension. Typically a statement is asked in the question and test takers are forced to answer one of only two possible options: true or false.

Creating a true or false quiz allows you create questions and check answers quicker than other question formats. For the learner who is answering true or false questions, a lot of content can be covered by a good number of questions in just a short period of time.

Answers to true and false questions should not be obvious to the test taker. Both true and false statements should have roughly the same length, be precise rather than ambiguous, and the whole quiz ideally randomized with no discernable pattern. These steps help limit the guesswork that comes with answering this type of quiz.

True or false answers

Click the New Quiz icon on the control panel.

True or false answersTrue or false answers

Double-click the green book icon to name your quiz.

True or false answersTrue or false answersClick Add Question on the main menu. Select True or False on the drop-down menu.

True or false answers

True or false answersDouble-click the True or False question on the left panel. Type the true or false statement on the Question Body .

True or false answersTrue or false answersTick the box if you want to include an image.

True or false answersTrue or false answersTick the box of the correct answer. A green check appears at the left.

True or false answersTrue or false answersAssign how many points you want to award for the correct answer.

True or false answersTrue or false answersType the custom feedback for the correct and incorrect answers on the boxes below.

True or false answersTrue or false answers

Hit the Preview button to look at how your questions looks in the real test.

True or false answers


Beginners – Reading Page, ESL Lounge, true or false answers.#True #or #false


Beginners – reading

Simple, short reading text which can be used in many ways: speaking comprehension, written comprehension, interview roleplay, dictation race, etc, etc.

After reading the ‘My Name Is Ben’ text, students can answer these true/false reading comprehension questions.

After reading the ‘My Name Is Ben’ text, students can do this open reading comprehension question exercise.

True or false answers

Come and join esl-lounge Premium.

  • High quality PDF lesson plans.
  • Full teacher notes – zero preparation time.
  • mp3 listening materials.
  • Full color flashcards for grammar/vocabulary teaching.
  • Thousands of content members from around the world.
  • Lesson plans in both British and American English.

$8 off Lifetime Membership. Enter coupon code 8LIFE at registration.

(valid to October 15th)

Short beginners level reading text. See below for associated exercises that can be done with this.

Multiple choice questions to go with the ‘The Town Of Clarkson’ reading text.

True or false questions to go with the ‘The Town Of Clarkson’ reading text.

Worksheet which gets students forming questions based on the ‘The Town Of Clarkson’ reading text.

Basic, short reading text. Can be used for comprehension or just as a prompt for students to discuss their own routines.

After reading the ‘Tom’s Day’ text, students complete a true/false comprehension questions worksheet.

After reading the ‘Tom’s Day’ text, students form questions based on the information in the text.

A short text about a journalist, his wife and their three children. Focus on different present forms of the verb ‘have’.

A worksheet that gets students to write questions in the present simple based on the ‘The Seattle Journalist’ reading. Focuses on have/has.

A worksheet that gets students to write short answers to questions based on the ‘The Seattle Journalist’ reading.

Another reading text that can be used in similar ways to the previous one. This one focuses more on daily routine.

After reading the ‘My Name Is Ben’ text, students can answer these true/false reading comprehension questions.

After reading the ‘My Working Day’ text, students form questions based on the information in the text.

A dialogue to read. Tom calls his local swimming pool to ask for information.

After reading the ‘Barnton Swimming Pool’ text, students can answer these true/false reading comprehension questions.

Students read about a garden.

Reading comprehension worksheet where students need to use one word to complete each sentence about the “My Garden” reading text.

True or false answers


True or False Trivia and Quizzes, true or false answers.#True #or #false


True or False Trivia and Quizzes

True or false answers

Tough , 15 Qns, Inquizition, Jan 12 09

Tough , 15 Qns, Inquizition, Feb 13 09

Tough , 15 Qns, Inquizition, Oct 23 08

Tough , 15 Qns, Inquizition, Aug 17 08

Tough , 25 Qns, timence, Apr 17 02

timence True or false answers

Average , 10 Qns, kyleisalive, Mar 15 16

kyleisalive True or false answers

Average , 10 Qns, Inquizition, Mar 02 12

Average , 10 Qns, timence, Nov 09 13

timence True or false answers

Tough , 10 Qns, onua9159, Apr 09 07

Tough , 25 Qns, timence, Jun 26 02

timence True or false answers

Average , 10 Qns, Inquizition, Apr 21 11

Average , 10 Qns, timence, Apr 28 13

timence True or false answers

Tough , 25 Qns, tigey, Jul 03 04

Tough , 20 Qns, tigey, Mar 28 07

Tough , 10 Qns, crisw, May 24 04

crisw True or false answers

Tough , 20 Qns, justawful, May 28 05

Tough , 10 Qns, Tizzabelle, Jan 20 15

Tizzabelle True or false answers

Tough , 10 Qns, lompocjoe, Jun 28 07

Average , 15 Qns, wilbill, Nov 03 14

wilbill True or false answers

Tough , 15 Qns, sunfloweruk23, Apr 16 03

Average , 10 Qns, Inquizition, Feb 04 11

Tough , 10 Qns, Inquizition, Jun 10 12

Tough , 15 Qns, cag1970, Mar 02 07

Tough , 10 Qns, vogon, Mar 04 06

Average , 10 Qns, Inquizition, Mar 27 12

Tough , 10 Qns, Inquizition, Jan 02 13

Average , 10 Qns, Creedy, Nov 30 12

Creedy True or false answers

Tough , 15 Qns, cag1970, Feb 17 05

Average , 10 Qns, salami_swami, Aug 04 11

salami_swami True or false answers

Average , 10 Qns, Linkan, Oct 05 03

Linkan True or false answers

Last Updated Nov 18 17 5:44 AM

True or false answers= Editor’s Pick True or false answers= FunTrivia Editor True or false answers= Gold Member

Teachers / educators: FunTrivia welcomes the use of our website and quizzes in the classroom as a teaching aid or for preparing and testing students. See our education page.

All questions, answers, and quiz content on this website is copyright FunTrivia.


IELTS True False Not Given Reading Lesson, true or false answers.#True #or


true or false answers

IELTS True False Not Given

This lesson explains how to answer True False Not Given questions for IELTS.

Firsly, you will be presented with a list of facts. You then have to look at the text in order to decide if the facts are true, false, or not given.

Below are some tips and strategies to help you answer this type of question.

  • If the fact you are given is clearly in the reading it is True
  • If the reading says the opposite of the fact you’ve been given it is False
  • If it is not true or false, it is Not Given

Strategies to answer the questions

  • The questions follow the order of the text.
  • Read the question carefully to make sure you fully understand what it is saying.
  • Scan the text to find where the answer is using key words from the question
  • When you find where the answer is, read the textcarefully to identify if you think it is T, F or NG.
  • The questions will probably use synonyms rather than the words in the text.
  • Look out for controlling words such as “only”, “all’, “never” etc. For example, if the fact in the question says ‘some’ and the fact in the text says ‘all’, then it is F.
  • Do not spend a long time looking for the answer to one question; it is probably NG, if you cannot find it.
  • Make sure you use the correct code; ‘Yes’, ‘No’, ‘No Information’ is sometimes used (these question are slightly different and you look for opinions rather than facts).

Example

Look at this statment, taken from the first sentence in the reading below:

Chiles originate in South America and have been eaten for at least 9,500 years.

Here are some example IELTS True False Not Given statements with answers:

  1. Chiles come from South America – True
  2. People began eating Chiles in the last few centuries – False
  3. South Americans were the first people to start eating Chiles – Not Given

Number one is clearly true. Notice the use of the synonym ‘come from‘ used instead of ‘originates‘. It is common to use different words.

Two is clearly false as it was 9,500 years ago, not a few 100 years ago.

Three is not in the text. Be careful about making assumptions then thinking it is true. It is quite probable that South Americans began eating Chiles first as they originated there; however, you can’t be sure of that and the text does not tell you that.

IELTS True False Not Given – Practice

Now, read the following text and answer the questions to the right of the reading using the drop down menu to choose either True, False, or Not Given.

[Please note that if you are on a mobile device the questions can be found in ‘navigation’ or by scrolling down to the bottom]

An explanation of the answers is provided below.

Do the following statements agree with the information in the text? Mark them:

True if the statement agrees with the text

False if the statement does not agree with the text

Not Given if there is no information about this in the text

Chilies

Chilies originate in South America and have been eaten for at least 9,500 years. Organised cultivation began around 5,400 BC. Christopher Columbus was the first European to encounter chilies, when he landed on the island of Hispaniola in 1492. He thought it was a type of pepper and called it the “red pepper”, a name still used today. After their introduction to Europe they were an immediate sensation and were quickly incorporated into the diet. From there they spread to Africa, India and East Asia.

The reason for the chili’s “hotness” lies in a chemical called Capsaisin. Capsaisin causes temporary irritation to the trigeminal cells, which are the pain receptors in the mouth, nose and throat. After the pain messages are transmitted to the brain, endorphins, natural pain killers, are released and these not only kill the pain but give the chili eater a short lived natural high. Other side effects include: an increased heart rate, a running nose and increased salivation and sweating, which can have a cooling effect in hot climates.

The reason for the presence of Capsaisin is thought to be to deter animals from eating the fruit. Only mammals feel the burning effects; birds feel nothing. As birds are a better method of distributing the seeds, which pass intact through their guts, Capsaisin would seem to be a result of natural selection.

The smaller chilies tend to be the hottest. This may reflect the fact that they tend to grow closer to the ground and are therefore more vulnerable to animals. The heat of a chili is measured on the Scoville scale. The hottest types such as the Habenero and the Scotch Bonnet rate between 100,000 and 300,000, the world famous Tabasco sauceГ’ rates at 15,000 to 30,000, about the same as the Thai prik khee nu, while the popular Jalapeno is between 5,000 and 15,000. Powdered chili is 500 to 1,000 and the mild capsicins and paprikas can range between 100 and 0.

IELTS True False Not Given – Answers Discussion

Chilies became popular as soon as they were brought into Europe – True

After their introduction to Europe they were an immediate sensation and were quickly incorporated into the diet.

There two statements are clearly saying the same thing. Notice the use of synomyms:

Became popular = sensation

As soon as = immediately

Brought into = introduced

Capsaisin causes significant damage to the mouth. – False

Capsaisin causes temporary irritation the trigeminal cells.

This is false as the statement says ‘significant damage‘. This is not the same as a ‘temporary irritation‘.

Chilies can be part of a birds diet – True

Only mammals feel the burning effects; birds feel nothing. As birds are a better method of distributing the seeds, which pass intact through their guts

This is true as this section in the reading clearly tells us birds feel nothing (when they eat them) and they distribute them around when it leaves their body. So clearly chilies are eaten by birds. In other words, they can be a part of a birds diet.

All large chilies grow high off the ground – Not Given

The smaller chilies tend to be the hottest. This may reflect the fact that they tend to grow closer to the ground and are therefore more vulnerable to animals.

We are told here that small chilies grow closer to the ground. It can be assumed then that many of the large ones are higher off the ground.

However, it says ‘ all large chilies‘. We are not given any information to say all of them grow high off the ground. It’s possible some don’t, so we don’t know which means it is Not Given.

People breed chilies for their heat – Not Given

The heat of a chili is measured on the Scoville scale.

Again, this is Not Given. We are given some information about heat in this sentence and those that follow.

But these are just descriptions about how they are hot. We are not told specifically that this is the reason they are breeding them.


Personality dictionary definition, personality defined, true or false answers.#True #or #false #answers


personality

True or false answers

True or false answers

Ethan’s friends say that he has a laid back, happy-go-lucky personality.

An example of personality is charismatic.

personality

True or false answers

pl. – ties

  1. Archaic the quality or fact of being a person; personhood
  2. Archaic the quality or fact of being a particular person; personal identity; individuality
    1. qualities of any individual as expressed by attitudes and physical and mental activities; distinctive individual qualities of a person, considered collectively
    2. the complex of qualities and characteristics seen as being distinctive to a group, nation, place, etc.
    1. the sum of such qualities seen as being capable of making, or likely to make, a favorable impression on other people
    2. Informal personal attractiveness; engaging manner or qualities
  3. a person; specif.,
    1. a notable person; personage
    2. a person known for appearances on TV, radio, etc.
  4. [pl.] remarks, usually of an offensive or disparaging nature, aimed at or referring to a person

Origin of personality

Middle English personalite from Late Latin personalitas from personalis, personal

personality

True or false answers

Origin of personality

personality

True or false answers

  1. A set of qualities that make a person (thing) distinct from another. The president has a unique personality.
  2. An assumed role or manner of behavior. My work PC emulates a Windows personality.In his final act, the comedian takes on a child’s personality.
  3. A celebrity. Johnny Carson was a respected television personality.
  4. Charisma, or qualities that make a person stand out from the crowd. The best contestant shows most personality.
  5. Something said or written which refers to the person, conduct, etc., of some individual, especially something of a disparaging or offensive nature; personal remarks. indulgence in personalities
  6. (law) That quality of a law which concerns the condition, state, and capacity of persons.

Coined between 1350 and 1400 from Middle English personalite, from Middle French, from Late Latin persōnālitās.