The 10 best chocolate bars, Epicurean – s Answer, just an answer.#Just


Epicurean s Answer

Just an answer

Scrivens sat at the end of an elongated red brick shoebox row of shops. There was a hardware store, a greengrocers, a hairdressers, a rather strange woman’s clothes shop – which for some reason sold toys – and finally Scrivens, a strange L-shaped grocery cum newsagents. It was here where you spent your pocket money. You’d lean your bike against the window and head in, straight to the angled display of chocolate bars. A sensory overload of colours, shapes and tastes. There are so many memories tied up with the first thrill of autonomy, to hold in your hand that coin which is yours, to do with what you want. What do you spend your money on? Sweets obviously!

They claim that 70% of chocolate bar purchases are impulse driven but there’s so much more to confectionery than the confectionery itself. Often those decisions are based just as much on what happened years ago, as it is on what is in the present. The texture and luxurious taste are only one small part of the nostalgic feeling that one associates with that indulgence.

Despite manufacturers constantly rebranding and repackaging trusted franchises, people have grown up with them and they are an integral part of peoples lives. You can’t underestimate the joy of running ones fingernail along the foil covered crevices of a four bar KitKat. The disappointment of getting the letter p, again, on your Smarties lid. The thrill of a free piece of cardboard with a Bounty or the anticipation of laying your Mars Bar on its front and disrobing it, revealing bit by bit your opulent quarry.

Whilst I have become a self-confessed chocolate snob, I acknowledge and appreciate the role that these bars have had in my life. So in a tribute to the everyday enemy foot solider in the battle of obesity, I decided to find the best ten chocolate bars of Britain. Obviously there has to be criteria. Without rules we’d be looking at confectionery chaos.

No solid chocolate bars – Dairy Milk, Yorkies and Buttons are all out.

It has to cost under a pound – so no fancy continental creation, or family sized treats.

No seasonal products – Cream Eggs a no go, despite being an annual event these bad boys are only (supposedly) available between Boxing Day and Easter.

Has to be currently available – No place for Drifters, Spiras or Treets.

Most importantly it has to be chocolate based – Jelly Tots, Tooty Frooties and Haribo are all firm favourites, but no chocolate, so no place on the list.

This is my top ten

Mars Bar

Invented in 1937 in Slough, it’s hard not to include this as the first entry on the list, it feels like the ultimate indulgence. I have spent many hours refining the best way to devour one. First chill the bar for 30 minutes in the fridge. Cut off the ends of the bar with a sharp knife, then lay the unwrapped bar on it’s top and make two incisions, where the sides meet the bottom layer of chocolate, along the length of the bar. Carefully chisel out the nougat section, so you’re left with the top, caramel and sides in a U-shape. Eat the nougat, fold in the sides and enjoy.

Fry’s Chocolate Cream

It’s the confectionery equivalent to a PG Wodehouse story. Each of its seven sections of fondant filling are enrobed in a crisp dark chocolate, reminiscent of when sartorial elegance was part of everyday life. It actually feels like you’re waiting with your Man at the railway station, ready for a spot of shooting in the country. It’s one of the few chocolate bars which carries in its taste, the heritage the brand has.

Galaxy Ripple

The brouhaha that went with the launch of Cadbury’s Twirl was simply a waste of time. There was already an incumbent on the coated rippled chocolate throne. It cost more than a Flake and tasted so much more like luxury, despite being made of Galaxy chocolate – which some have described as waxy, oily and cheap.

Double Decker

Overly sweet without any feelings of decadence, this nougat-biscuit combination has unique properties. If you feel like a Double Decker, there is nothing similar with which to replace it, should you not have one to hand. There are memories of raisins lurking in the biscuit base, but I’m not sure whether they were meant to be there.

Smarties

Whilst other pocket money treats came in flimsy paper wrapper, Smarties lived in a sturdy cardboard tube. With its alphabet-embossed coloured plastic lid and beautiful smooth rounded edges, it was the perfect diameter for little hands. Now in a flimsier hexagonal tube, with more colours, the wonder of having that many sweets in one packet is undiminished.

Crunchie

Never has a snack item got the balance of chocolate to interior more correct than the Crunchie. From the golden wrapper to the rich golden interior – it’s a party in a bar. Due to its composition it’s impossible to eat without chipping the chocolate from the honeycomb for at least a part of the experience. There is something pleasingly gender neutral about the Crunchie.

Cadbury s Caramel

Recently bought into the Dairy Milk stable, this was always sold as a seductive luxury item. Sensuous and seductive, from the gentle curves of the bar (which, for some reason, always reminded me of a Ford Sierra) to the unctuous caramel interior. Like all good treats, the Caramel shares the feeling that even though you’ve finished, there should be another piece left

Maltesers

Targeted at women and sold as a lighter option to the more substantial bars on the market, this is a mistake. Although these crisp malt and chocolate spheres are lightweight, it’s the sheer quantity that give them their gravitas. With so many in a bag, a good rhythm can be established. I did go through a phase – which lasted about 10 years – of counting the amount in every bag I ate, 13 was a bad day, 20 a very good one, normally it was 16-17.

Surprisingly high in calories and remarkably bland in chocolate satisfaction. None the less there is something very alluring about the twin bars of a Twix, least of all the ways in which to eat them. Do you bite off the caramel first, or the biscuit? Nibble or bite? It is always more satisfying than you think and whilst a lot of confectionary doesn’t quite live up to there billing, the Twix does.

Munchies

Munchies are what Rolos want to be when they grow up. Carrying a premium price, each gold-tipped tube contains chocolate cubes filled with caramel AND biscuit! I always feel a touch nauseous after eating a whole pack, but take this as a sign of value for money.

Just an answer


The Human Difference: How Humans are Unique Compared to All Other Animals,


The Human Difference: How Humans are Unique Compared to All Other Animals

Are Humans Unique?

Evolutionary biology proposes that humans evolved from ape-like ancestors. If this is true then we are nothing more than glorified apes. However, compared to our closest relatives , scientific research indicates that humans are unique on many fronts, including creativity, personality, abstract thinking, and moral judgment.

The Bible makes the claim that humans alone are created in the image of God. 1 What exactly does this mean? Some have equated the image of God as being the physical characteristics of our bodies that make up the way we look. In fact, the Mormons have taken this interpretation to extreme by saying that God is just an exalted man, who has a body of flesh and bones. 1 However, the Bible says that both males and females are created in the image of God. 2 Unless God were a hermaphrodite (having both male and female sexual organs), this phrase could not refer to just physical characteristics. In addition, there are various verses in the Bible that describe God as having non-human physical characteristics, such as feathers and wings. 3 Should we think of God as being an overgrown chicken? Certainly not! God is so unlike humans physically, that the Bible often paints word pictures to give us a glimpse of what God is like.

Creativity

So if the image of God does not refer to physical characteristics, what does it refer to? It is certainly likely that part of the image of God refers to the ability of humans to be creative. Anthropology tells us that sophisticated works of art first appeared in the fossil record about 40,000-50,000 years ago, 4 at the time that moderns humans first appeared. No other species of animal, including the apes, are able to create and understand images of art and drawing.

Consciousness

Human consciousness is a mystery that has evaded decades of intensive research by neurophysiologists. According to a recent article:

When an organism s neural pathways grow sufficiently complex, materialists insist, their firings are somehow accompanied by consciousness. But despite decades of effort by philosophers and neurophysiologists, no one has been able to come up with a remotely plausible explanation of how this happens–how the hunk of gray meat in our skull gives rise to private Technicolor experience. One distinguished commentator on the mind-body problem, Daniel Dennett, author of Consciousness Explained, has been driven to declare that there is really no such thing as consciousness–we are all zombies, though we re unaware of it. 5

Personality

Another thing that makes humans unique is personality. According to Joseph LeDoux, a neuroscientist at New York University:

We have no idea how our brains make us who we are. There is as yet no neuroscience of personality. We have little understanding of how art and history are experienced by the brain. The meltdown of mental life in psychosis is still a mystery. In short, we have yet to come up with a theory that can pull all this together. 6

Abstract thinking

Is the human brain that much different from that of our closest relatives, the chimpanzees? According to Daniel J. Povinelli, from the University of Louisiana s New Iberia Research Center

Humans constantly invoke unobservable phenomena and variables to explain why certain things are happening. Chimps operate in the world of concrete, tangible things that can be seen. The content of their minds is about the observable world. 7

Just an answerInsight into how chimpanzees really think can be seen in some recent experiments performed by Dr. Povinelli. In these experiments, the researchers used the chimps natural begging gesture to examine how they really think about their world. They confronted the chimps with two familiar experimenters, one offering a piece of food and the other holding out an undesirable block of wood. As expected, the chimps had no trouble distinguishing between the block and the food and immediately gestured to the experimenter offering the food. Next, the researchers wanted to see if the chimps would be able to choose between a person who could see them and a person who could not. If the chimpanzees understood how other animals see, they would gesture only to the person who could see them. The researchers achieved the seeing/not-seeing contrast by having the two experimenters adopt different postures. In one test, one experimenter wore a blindfold over her eyes while the other wore a blindfold over her mouth. In the other tests, one of the experimenters wore a bucket over her head, placed her hands over her eyes or sat with her back turned to the chimpanzee. All these postures were modeled after the behaviors that had been observed during the chimpanzees spontaneous play. The results of the experiments were astonishing. In the tests involving blindfolds, buckets and hands over the eyes–the apes entered the lab and paused but then were just as likely to gesture to the person who could not see them as to the person who could. In several cases, the chimps gestured to the person who could not see them and then, when nothing happened, gestured again, as if puzzled by the fact that the experimenter did not respond. In the case of experimenters facing with their backs to the chimps, they performed as if they knew that those facing way from them could not see and offer them food. However, subsequent experiments proved that the chimps had merely responded to conditioning from the initial experiments, since they had only received food from those experimenters who faced them. This was proven by having experimenters facing away from the chimps, but then turning to look over their shoulders. The chimps were just as likely to gesture to the experimenters facing away as the one who turned to look at them. Chimpanzees have no clue that humans must face them in order to see. It is obvious from these experiments that chimpanzees lack even a simple understanding of how their world works, but merely react to conditioning from directly observable events. 8

Other researchers have noted that chimpanzees do not understand the cause and effect of their actions. Apes will climb onto a box to reach fruit, but if the box is absent, will place on the ground beneath the fruit a sheet of paper and stand upon it. 9

A more recent study examined the ability of human infants and young chimpanzees to help human adults. 10 18-month-old human infants and young chimpanzees were presented with four categories of problems: out-of-reach objects, access thwarted by a physical obstacle, achieving a wrong (correctable) result, and using a wrong (correctable) means. While human infants could perform all four tasks, chimpanzees could only perform the first task. As in previous studies, chimpanzees were unable to discern when an individual failed at a simple task and how he could help. The researchers concluded:

A number of theorists have claimed that human beings cooperate with one another and help one another (especially non-kin) in ways not found in other animal species (26 28). This is almost certainly so, and the current results demonstrate that even very young children have a natural tendency to help other persons solve their problems, even when the other is a stranger and they receive no benefit at all. 10

Body, soul, spirit

Besides the rather obvious differences in the way animals process information in their brains, the Bible (and science) confirm that there are major differences in the ways humans make moral judgments (animals don t make such judgments, as we shall see). Part of what is meant by the term in the image of God can be found in chapters immediately following its first usage (Genesis 1) in the Bible. Both Adam and Eve had a personal relationship with God in the Garden of Eden. Such a personal relationship is not described, nor seen, for any other animal species. It is the presence of a spirit that was instilled into humans 11 that separates us from the animals. There are three kinds of life that God has created in this universe:


Just an answer, just an answer.#Just #an #answer


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    Distributor: Warner Interactive Release Date: 1996 Note: This review was originally published October 20, 1996 Some projects simply get in over their heads attempting to accomplish more than is possible with the available tal..

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    Genre: Graphic AdventureRelease date: August 31, 2017Platform: Windows The Last Good Day Last Day of June is a story-based adventure that begins with Carl and June – a married couple who set out on a dri..

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    Steamburg is an award-winning puzzle adventure in which you become professor/inventor Vincent Cornelius Moore. Having studied electricity and lightning most of your life, you must battle robots that have invaded the city of Steamburg a..

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    The Exorcist: Legion VR is part investigation, part exorcism. and all horror. From Fun Train and Wolf Wood (A Chair in A Room: Greenwater, The Harbinger Trials) the game — built exclusively for VR — is based on the events ..

    Just an answer

    I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the hobby of video gaming in general, and my gaming habits specifically. I thought I’d explore various aspects of both in a new series of articles. In this first one, I’m going to tackle an abs..

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    Release Date: November 2000 Note: This review was originally published July 11, 2003 On the back of the box of Blair Witch Volume 1, there is a quote from the Just Adventure preview that states, “Don’t play this game in the da..

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    More info:Developer btf is Gearing Up For a Trüberbrook Kickstarter – October 4, 2017 Visit the Kickstarter page It’s the late ’60s; the setting is cold war Germany. You are Hans Tannenhauser, a PhD candidate in the fiel..

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    The adventure game series Captain Disaster is based on a comedy science fiction character from a series of short stories written years ago by Dave Seaman of Team Disaster. As time goes by, however, the game appears to have less and less ..


  • Excel Workbook – Automatic Goal Seek, just an answer.#Just #an #answer


    Excel Workbook

    This article demonstrates a simple VBA method to utilize the Goal Seek tool automatically, similar to a native Excel formula.

    Goal Seek is an Excel built-in tool that uses numeric approximation methods to back solve for an input value to a system of formulas when given a desired output value. If you are not familiar with Goal Seek , many tutorials online can guide you to using this tool. I hate it, and try to avoid it at all costs but like everything else that I hate, there come times when I just have to face it like a man.

    The problem? For one, it s not transparent, and we can t exactly tell what Excel did in the background. But more importantly, it s a pain to apply and to udpate. While all other formulas can automatically re-calculate upon changes to the input values, Goal Seek requires you to click on the menu to bring up the dialog box, then fill out three input boxes manually.

    Just an answer

    See the spreadsheet above. Everything in blue are input values to this dynamic model, which can affect the results. We want to set E14 to a value specified in D3 , so these two cells correspond to the first two parameters of Goal Seek ( Set cell and To value ). As an alternative, we put the difference between the two in F6 , and set this cell to 0 (x=y is equivalent to x-y=0). This approach will slightly simplify the coding later on, and is an easier check for the user.

    The Necessary Adjustment in D6 plays an accomondating role in adjusting each of the values so that the final calculation reaches target. For Goal Seek , it is the third parameter By changing cell . Initially we have no idea what this adjustment should be, and leave it at 0. At this time, F6 is showing 0.8%, indicating that the necessary criteria haven t been fulfilled.

    Just an answer

    Let s do a Goal Seek now set F6 to 0 by changing D6 . If you record this into a macro, say Macro1, you can quickly repeat it by using an assigned shortcut key stroke, or hook it up with a command button for an easy UI. A lot of people do exactly this as an enhancement to the otherwise awkward model, but it s not good enough. Let s automate it.

    Press Ctrl+F11 to bring up the Visual Basic Editor to see the embedding code to Macro1, and you ll see this line of code:

    Fair enough. It s almost in plain English, and shouldn t take an VBA expert to understand. The next step is to copy and paste this line out of Macro1, to somewhere more automatically executable.

    Browse to Sheet1 under Microsoft Excel Objects . Either type or use the drop-down box to create the following VBA event:

    Private Sub Worksheet_Calculate()

    This subroutine will be called every time the calculate event is triggered on this worksheet. Depending on whether you set the calculation to Automatic or Manual in Tools- Options , this happens when any formula-based cell changes value to a new input value. The idea is to paste the Goal Seek code here so it will be called whenever F6 may change; however, let s keep it in a separate function for the sake of good programming practice:

    Private Sub Worksheet_Calculate()

    Private Sub CheckGoalSeek()

    In the Visual Basic editor, it should look like this:

    Just an answer

    Now give it a try! Change any of the blue input values and you ll see Goal Seek working by itself to come up with the new adjustment values. Awesome! We re done now in terms of automating a tedious task.

    Note: Always save your work before you test out the macro. depending on the version of your Excel, the repetitive call to Goal Seek may result in a run-time error. However, the next part of this code will solve the problem.

    Have you noticed how slow this enhancement has made your model? Maybe not, if you have a relatively new computer or a small workbook like the sample file. But if you add some temporary debugging code to the function, you ll notice how many times your function is (unnecessarily) being triggered when you change any of the input values:

    Private Sub CheckGoalSeek()

    Give it another run and, hey:

    Just an answer

    You just changed one input, and Goal Seek ran close to 2,000 times! Why.

    The subroutine Worksheet_Calculate is triggered every time any function calculates a new value. There are six cells (in column E as well as cell F6 ) that depend on the changing cell D6 . As Goal Seek cycles through possible values as the input, all these six cells have to update and in turn call up more instances of Goal Seek .

    Imagine you want to paint a wall red. Every time you see that the wall isn t entirely red, you call up a painter to do the job. As soon as the first painter gets to work, you realize that it s still not entirely red, so you call up another one. Even when you ve got 30 painters to simultaneously working on the wall (if that s physically possible), there might still be a white spot remaining and you make yet another phone call chances are, the job would be complete before the last five painters arrive on site. This algorithm gets the job done, but heck, is super inefficient. Add a little check to the process and avoid ever calling more than one painter!

    Private Sub CheckGoalSeek()

    Static isWorking As Boolean

    If Round(Range( F6 ).Value, 6) 0 And Not isWorking Then

    Adding in the static variable helps flagging whether the Goal Seek function has been employed. The first time this function is called, it raises the flag and will not release it until the full iteration of Goal Seek completes. During this time, this subroutine would still be called 2,000 instances, but it would simply bypass all the code and exit. Try again and F3 increments only once per change of input values, indicating that the Goal Seek isn t running wild to waste your computer s resources. That s what we wanted, and now we can remove that debugging code.

    The first part of the If statement checks whether the solution already exists i.e. if Worksheet_Calculate is being triggered by some formula updates that are completely irrelevant to this system. If so, there s no need to call Goal Seek at all.

    Here s another catch: if you want a robust model, you ve gotta consider any potential for error. How about an invalid input value? Keeping the target overall raise at 5% and changing the max raise to 0% is for sure an impossible scenario, and Goal Seek goes crazy as follows:

    Just an answer

    We realize that wasn t very smart and change the max back to 6% and geez it doesn t work! The adjustment factor had been thrown too far off anything reasonable, and now Goal Seek doesn t know what to do with such an awkward initial guess. Our model is stuck, and that ain t cool. A quick way to fix this is to reset the initial guess every time we call Goal Seek:

    Private Sub CheckGoalSeek()

    Static isWorking As Boolean

    If Round(Range( F6 ).Value, 6) 0 And Not isWorking Then

    It s a slight waste of resources if educated and reasonable input values can be expected at all times, but definitely a worthy investment if you want to prevent ever getting stuck .

    Lastly, it s dangerous to use absolute cell references in macros. If columns or rows are added or removed, the key cells would have changed locations (from D6 to D7 , for example) and the macro will get confused! The best practice is to name the cells and refer to them by name, like the following:

    Private Sub CheckGoalSeek()

    Static isWorking As Boolean

    If Round(Range( GoalSeekCell ).Value, 6) 0 And Not isWorking Then

    Range( ByChangingCell ).Value = 0

    Range( GoalSeekCell ).GoalSeek Goal:=0, ChangingCell:=.Range( ByChangingCell )

    Now we have a robust macro that automatically updates Goal Seek ! Enjoy!


    Excel Workbook – Automatic Goal Seek, just an answer.#Just #an #answer


    Excel Workbook

    This article demonstrates a simple VBA method to utilize the Goal Seek tool automatically, similar to a native Excel formula.

    Goal Seek is an Excel built-in tool that uses numeric approximation methods to back solve for an input value to a system of formulas when given a desired output value. If you are not familiar with Goal Seek , many tutorials online can guide you to using this tool. I hate it, and try to avoid it at all costs but like everything else that I hate, there come times when I just have to face it like a man.

    The problem? For one, it s not transparent, and we can t exactly tell what Excel did in the background. But more importantly, it s a pain to apply and to udpate. While all other formulas can automatically re-calculate upon changes to the input values, Goal Seek requires you to click on the menu to bring up the dialog box, then fill out three input boxes manually.

    Just an answer

    See the spreadsheet above. Everything in blue are input values to this dynamic model, which can affect the results. We want to set E14 to a value specified in D3 , so these two cells correspond to the first two parameters of Goal Seek ( Set cell and To value ). As an alternative, we put the difference between the two in F6 , and set this cell to 0 (x=y is equivalent to x-y=0). This approach will slightly simplify the coding later on, and is an easier check for the user.

    The Necessary Adjustment in D6 plays an accomondating role in adjusting each of the values so that the final calculation reaches target. For Goal Seek , it is the third parameter By changing cell . Initially we have no idea what this adjustment should be, and leave it at 0. At this time, F6 is showing 0.8%, indicating that the necessary criteria haven t been fulfilled.

    Just an answer

    Let s do a Goal Seek now set F6 to 0 by changing D6 . If you record this into a macro, say Macro1, you can quickly repeat it by using an assigned shortcut key stroke, or hook it up with a command button for an easy UI. A lot of people do exactly this as an enhancement to the otherwise awkward model, but it s not good enough. Let s automate it.

    Press Ctrl+F11 to bring up the Visual Basic Editor to see the embedding code to Macro1, and you ll see this line of code:

    Fair enough. It s almost in plain English, and shouldn t take an VBA expert to understand. The next step is to copy and paste this line out of Macro1, to somewhere more automatically executable.

    Browse to Sheet1 under Microsoft Excel Objects . Either type or use the drop-down box to create the following VBA event:

    Private Sub Worksheet_Calculate()

    This subroutine will be called every time the calculate event is triggered on this worksheet. Depending on whether you set the calculation to Automatic or Manual in Tools- Options , this happens when any formula-based cell changes value to a new input value. The idea is to paste the Goal Seek code here so it will be called whenever F6 may change; however, let s keep it in a separate function for the sake of good programming practice:

    Private Sub Worksheet_Calculate()

    Private Sub CheckGoalSeek()

    In the Visual Basic editor, it should look like this:

    Just an answer

    Now give it a try! Change any of the blue input values and you ll see Goal Seek working by itself to come up with the new adjustment values. Awesome! We re done now in terms of automating a tedious task.

    Note: Always save your work before you test out the macro. depending on the version of your Excel, the repetitive call to Goal Seek may result in a run-time error. However, the next part of this code will solve the problem.

    Have you noticed how slow this enhancement has made your model? Maybe not, if you have a relatively new computer or a small workbook like the sample file. But if you add some temporary debugging code to the function, you ll notice how many times your function is (unnecessarily) being triggered when you change any of the input values:

    Private Sub CheckGoalSeek()

    Give it another run and, hey:

    Just an answer

    You just changed one input, and Goal Seek ran close to 2,000 times! Why.

    The subroutine Worksheet_Calculate is triggered every time any function calculates a new value. There are six cells (in column E as well as cell F6 ) that depend on the changing cell D6 . As Goal Seek cycles through possible values as the input, all these six cells have to update and in turn call up more instances of Goal Seek .

    Imagine you want to paint a wall red. Every time you see that the wall isn t entirely red, you call up a painter to do the job. As soon as the first painter gets to work, you realize that it s still not entirely red, so you call up another one. Even when you ve got 30 painters to simultaneously working on the wall (if that s physically possible), there might still be a white spot remaining and you make yet another phone call chances are, the job would be complete before the last five painters arrive on site. This algorithm gets the job done, but heck, is super inefficient. Add a little check to the process and avoid ever calling more than one painter!

    Private Sub CheckGoalSeek()

    Static isWorking As Boolean

    If Round(Range( F6 ).Value, 6) 0 And Not isWorking Then

    Adding in the static variable helps flagging whether the Goal Seek function has been employed. The first time this function is called, it raises the flag and will not release it until the full iteration of Goal Seek completes. During this time, this subroutine would still be called 2,000 instances, but it would simply bypass all the code and exit. Try again and F3 increments only once per change of input values, indicating that the Goal Seek isn t running wild to waste your computer s resources. That s what we wanted, and now we can remove that debugging code.

    The first part of the If statement checks whether the solution already exists i.e. if Worksheet_Calculate is being triggered by some formula updates that are completely irrelevant to this system. If so, there s no need to call Goal Seek at all.

    Here s another catch: if you want a robust model, you ve gotta consider any potential for error. How about an invalid input value? Keeping the target overall raise at 5% and changing the max raise to 0% is for sure an impossible scenario, and Goal Seek goes crazy as follows:

    Just an answer

    We realize that wasn t very smart and change the max back to 6% and geez it doesn t work! The adjustment factor had been thrown too far off anything reasonable, and now Goal Seek doesn t know what to do with such an awkward initial guess. Our model is stuck, and that ain t cool. A quick way to fix this is to reset the initial guess every time we call Goal Seek:

    Private Sub CheckGoalSeek()

    Static isWorking As Boolean

    If Round(Range( F6 ).Value, 6) 0 And Not isWorking Then

    It s a slight waste of resources if educated and reasonable input values can be expected at all times, but definitely a worthy investment if you want to prevent ever getting stuck .

    Lastly, it s dangerous to use absolute cell references in macros. If columns or rows are added or removed, the key cells would have changed locations (from D6 to D7 , for example) and the macro will get confused! The best practice is to name the cells and refer to them by name, like the following:

    Private Sub CheckGoalSeek()

    Static isWorking As Boolean

    If Round(Range( GoalSeekCell ).Value, 6) 0 And Not isWorking Then

    Range( ByChangingCell ).Value = 0

    Range( GoalSeekCell ).GoalSeek Goal:=0, ChangingCell:=.Range( ByChangingCell )

    Now we have a robust macro that automatically updates Goal Seek ! Enjoy!


    The SQ3R Reading Method, just an answer.#Just #an #answer


    Study Guides and Strategies

    Man reading should be

    man intensely alive.

    The book should be a

    Study guides

    • Time, stress and

    Problem solving

  • Studying/learning;

    with others, and in the classroom

  • Thinking/memorizing;

    Reading and research series

    SQ3R reading method

    SQ3R is a reading strategy formed from its letters:

    Survey! Question! Read! Recite! Review!

    SQ3R will help you build a framework to understand your reading assignment.

    Before you read, Survey the chapter:
    • the title, headings, and subheadings
    • captions under pictures, charts, graphs or maps
    • review questions or teacher-made study guides
    • introductory and concluding paragraphs
    • summary
    Question while you are surveying:
    • Turn the title, headings, and/or subheadings into questions
    • Read questions at the end of the chapters or after each subheading
    • Ask yourself,

    “What did my instructor say about this chapter or subject

    when it was assigned?”

  • Ask yourself,

    “What do I already know about this subject?”

    Note: If it is helpful to you, write out these questions for consideration.

    This variation is called SQW3R

  • When you begin to Read:
    • Look for answers to the questions you first raised
    • Answer questions at the beginning or end of chapters or study guides
    • Reread captions under pictures, graphs, etc.
    • Note all the underlined, italicized, bold printed words or phrases
    • Study graphic aids
    • Reduce your speed for difficult passages
    • Stop and reread parts which are not clear
    • Read only a section at a time and recite after each section
    Recite after you’ve read a section:
    • Orally ask yourself questions about what you have just read, or summarize, in your own words, what you read
    • Take notes from the text but write the information in your own words
    • Underline or highlight important points you’ve just read
    • Reciting:

    The more senses you use the more likely you are to remember what you read Triple strength learning: Seeing, saying, hearing

    Quadruple strength learning: Seeing , saying , hearing, writing.

    Review: an ongoing process
    • After you have read and recited the entire chapter,

    write questions in the margins for those points

    you have highlighted or underlined.

  • If you took notes while reciting,

    write questions for the notes you have taken

    in the left hand margins of your notebook.

  • Complete the form for a critical reading review
    • Page through the text and/or your notebook to re-acquaint yourself

    with the important points.

  • Cover the right hand column of your text/note-book

    and orally ask yourself the questions in the left hand margins.

  • Orally recite or write the answers from memory.
  • Develop mnemonic devices for material which need to be memorized.

    Make flash cards for those questions which give you difficulty.

    • Alternate between your flash cards and notes and test yourself

    (orally or in writing) on the questions you formulated.

  • Make additional flash cards if necessary.
    • Using the text and notebook, make a Table of Contents – list all the topics and sub-topics you need to know from the chapter.
    • From the Table of Contents, make a Study Sheet/ Spatial Map.
    • Recite the information orally and in your own words as you put the Study Sheet/Map together.
    • As you have consolidated all the information you need for this chapter, periodically review the Sheet/Map so that at test time

    you will not have to cram.

    Reading and research series

    Reading critically | Pre-reading strategies | SQ3R reading method |

    Just an answerWebsite overview: Since 1996 the Study Guides and Strategies Website has been researched, authored, maintained and supported as an international, learner-centric, educational public service. Permission is granted to freely copy, adapt, and distribute individual Study Guides in print format in non-commercial educational settings that benefit learners. Please be aware that the Guides welcome, and are under, continuous review and revision. For that reason, digitization and reproduction of all content on the Internet can only be with permission through a licensed agreement. Linking to the Guides is encouraged!

    Just an answerThe Study Guides and Strategies Website is intended for students, ages middle school through returning adult, as well as their parents, teachers and support professionals. Its resources are intended to empower all learners without regard to institutional and national boundaries; cultural mores and religious beliefs; race, gender and sexual orientation. Full disclaimer on use


    WiserUTips: How to answer tricky assessment test questions, just an answer.#Just #an


    just an answer

    Just an answer

    Zlloyd1, I know exactly what you mean! I hate assessment tests as well, particularly when they only give you an option between something bad and something awful. In those instances, just keep trying to chose the lesser of the two evils that more closely matches what you prefer. I personally think companies lose good people because of stupid assessment tests.

    Just an answer

    I lie on these things and fail. I tell the truth and still fail. wtf. whats sad is im an amazing person to work with/for but noone will ever know because of these stupid tests.

    zlloyd1 – I am in the same position as you are. The assessment for target was painful to get through as 80% of the 2 choices I didn t agree with. IT was ridiculous.

    Just an answer

    Just Jill, I think those kinds of assessment tests are judging whether you are a social type of person or an analytical one so I d say the way to answer is dependent on the type of job for which you are applying. For example, if it s a sales job, I d answer being more social. If you are handling the company s taxes, answer more analytically. It s very job-type dependent.

    What about the tests that ask what would your current or most recent employer say ranging from below other countries workers to much higher than your computer workers?

    Just an answer

    Sandi, I m not sure I understand the question. Are you saying that a test asked how your past employers would compare you and used examples that included worker from another country or computer workers ? If that s the question, I think it s awful that they asked such a question. It s insulting to workers in other countries (like they are somehow the complete and negative opposite of computer workers). and totally confusing for you. As far as how to answer it, if you really want the job, I d try to answer honestly about where you d place yourself in the range (tending toward a higher score than a lower one). Thanks, Kathy

    Just an answer

    i have trouble answering this question please help me

    Just an answer

    Wow, Sofia, I am sorry that you were asked such odd questions. No wonder you are confused about how to answer them! As far as how to answer them, I d be guessing, but for the 1st one, I d talk about how you will ensure that the ostrich eggs will sell successfully through merchandising, operations, marketing, etc. For the 2nd one, I d just trying to come up with something not controversial (like don t get into politics, religion or anything prejudicial), maybe something like, I don t believe that breakfast is the most important meal because I haven t been eating it for years and it makes me feel awake and eager to face the day. Regarding the 3rd question, about the tortoise and the leopard (or in America, we d say the tortoise and the hare), I would say that if the tortoise won it was because smart, steady work ensures success because you are not rushing and making mistakes. In general, think what the questions are trying to get to . in these questions, they are trying to see if 1) you can put a plan together to successfully sell something (the eggs), 2) you can deal constructively with people who have a different opinion and 3) you will be careful and methodical in your work.

    Just an answer


    11 Sites That Will Pay You Just For Being An Expert #answers


    #get paid to answer questions

    #

    11 Sites That Will Pay You Just For Being An Expert

    This is a list of sites that will pay you for answering questions and giving advice in some form. Many of these are just extra money.

    Text

    Get paid for answering general questions people send in via their cell phones:

    • 63336 Read Review Based out of UK, but hires Americans as well. Pay is around .46 per question answered.
    • ChaCha Read Review US only. Different roles available: expediter, voice transcriber, vetter, and specialist. 02 to .20/question answered.

    Web

    Get paid for answering general and/or specific questions on various websites:

    • Studypool An online marketplace for tutors with an expertise on specific subjects. Get money right after answering a question.
    • Directly Read Review If you know a lot about specific companies, you can get paid to answer people s questions about them. Cash out is at just $2.
    • Ether Read Review Get your own phone number and charge your own rate for doling out advice.
    • FixYa Help people out with their tech problems and earn points you can exchange for gifts.
    • Just Answer Read Review Experts are paid a percentage of what customers are willing to pay for answers.
    • Maven Read Review Become a micro consultant for Maven and earn money answering questions about things you know.

    Back to Directory Home

    Last Updated: Monday, September 5, 2016


    Just Jumble – App for Jumble: That Scrambled Word Game #telephone #answering


    #jumble puzzle answers

    #

    JUST JUMBLE

    The Free and Official Jumble App
    from Jumble Authors Jeff Knurek and David L. Hoyt!

    Play America’s favorite word puzzle game in this fun and punny app!

    • Jumble puzzles are played by millions of fans every day. More than 600 newspapers and over 100 Internet sites carry the daily
      Jumble puzzle!
  • This FREE app has added puzzles 10 times and now contains 794 of the best Jumbles ever created! And the answer to each of these puzzles is a smile about to happen.
  • Each and every puzzle was created by the hugely talented team of David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek, the Most Syndicated Puzzle Author Illustrator Duo in the world.
  • This app is utterly simple to play and fun for players of any age! These are the humorous newspaper puzzles that people have loved for over 60 YEARS (Jumble: That Scrambled Word Game first appeared in print in 1954). In Just Jumble , new players will enjoy the app’s unique play sequence — discovering a cartoon puzzle’s humorous solution is easier than ever! Long-time Jumble players will love tackling every aspect of these word puzzle masterpieces.

    Super easy to play! Hundreds of deliciously fun and punny puzzles! Entertaining hints and insights from Jeff and David. And beautiful high resolution graphics show off the cartoons full-screen (they look great even on older smaller phones).

    Try the free app today! And tell all of the Jumble lovers in your family!

    If you’re curious to know more about the duo that create the puzzles for Jumble: That Scrambled Word Game. and what makes them so creative. check out the bottom of the page.

    All Jumble Puzzles, Logos, Indicia and Marks are the Copyrighted Property of
    Tribune Content Agency, LLC 2016 Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

    AVAILABLE IN THESE STORES

    WHO ARE THESE GUYS?

    David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek began inventing toys and games together back at the turn of the century (the year 2000). David lives in Chicago and authors puzzles for 20+ daily word games. As this nation’s most syndicated puzzle creator, he is often called The Man Who Puzzles America. Jeff lives near Indianapolis and is an award winning toy and game inventor, consumer product developer, puzzle creator, cartoonist and musician. Together, David and Jeff create the world’s favorite puzzles!
    For more about David L. Hoyt, please click here!
    For more about Jeff Knurek, please click here!

    Another great game by Adveractive, Inc. – Chapel Hill, NC, USA –