AP Central – The AP Psychology Exam #all #math #answers


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AP Central

Important Updates

New Exam for Classroom Use

A secure 2016 AP Psychology Exam is now available on the AP Course Audit website. To access, sign in to your AP Course Audit account, and click on the Secure Documents link in the Resources section of your Course Status page.

Previously Secure Exam Now Publicly Available

A 2012 AP Psychology Exam previously available only through your AP Course Audit account is now available on AP Central. This means you can now use the questions from this older exam without restriction.

Exam Day 2017

Mon, May 1, 12 noon

Exam Duration

Exam Overview

The AP Psychology Exam measures students’ knowledge of the 14 key topics and fields of study in psychology and tests their ability to define, compare, and apply concepts and research findings. Questions are based on key terminology, scientific methodology, and theories associated with each subfield.

Free-response questions may require students to interrelate different content areas and to analyze and evaluate psychological constructs and, more generally, theoretical perspectives.

A note about the DSM and the AP Psychology Exam: All terminology, criteria, and classifications referred to in multiple-choice and free-response questions adhere to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5).

Encourage your students to visit the AP Psychology student page for exam information and exam practice.

Policies

Exam Format

Section I

Multiple Choice 100 Questions | 1 Hour, 10 Minutes | 66.6% of Exam Score

  • Define and explain content from a range of course topics
  • Apply skills of comparison and interpretation to course concepts, theories, and scientific methods

Section II

Free Response 2 Questions | 50 Minutes | 33.3% of Exam Score

Topics/themes addressed by these questions may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Analyze a unique scenario using concepts from different theoretical frameworks or subdomains in the field
  • Design, analyze, or critique a research study

Exam Questions and Scoring Information

Looking for sample multiple-choice and free-response questions? You can find them in:

The Course Description (.pdf/461KB), which has everything you need to know about the course and exam.

A full practice exam on AP Course Audit. Log in to your account and then click on the Secure Documents link within the Resources section of your Course Status page.

An AP Psychology Exam from 2012, previously available only through your AP Course Audit account. Since this exam is now publicly available, you can use the questions without restriction.

The Past Exam Questions page. which features free-response questions and scoring information for exams given before 2003.

The Student Performance Q recently released to teachers as a practice exam had been administered in 2014 to a small and randomly selected group of students in U.S. schools for equating purposes. Given the 2014 administration, several multiple-choice questions on that exam were not aligned with DSM-5. In order not to disadvantage students who took the international version of the exam this year, those six questions were removed from scoring. They were removed from the practice exam PDF as well, so as not to have current students practicing on outdated material.

2016: Free-Response Questions


Guide: Answering Exam Questions #ask #question #and #get #answer


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Answering Exam Questions

L ike any other kind of writing, answering essay test questions requires practice before it becomes easier. If you find yourself struggling with exam questions, ask your professor well in advance if you can have sample questions to practice on at home. Then set a timer and practice! Several practice sessions will give you better results than a single, long session, so give yourself plenty of time to prepare for this kind of writing under time pressure.

Several other strategies can also help you write better responses on essay tests.

  1. Read through the entire exam to plan an overall strategy.
  2. Look at each exam question to identify key words.
  3. Think about what kind of writing the key word or words call for.
  4. Make notes to yourself of the points you want to cover in the response.
  5. Begin your response by echoing the question.
  6. Leave yourself 10 minutes at the end of the test period to re-read both the questions and your responses.
  7. Final advice


AP Central – The AP United States History Exam #quiz #questions #and


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AP Central

AP U.S. History Redesign
We’re excited to announce the redesign of the AP U.S. History course and exam, which takes effect in the 2014-15 school year. To learn more about the changes and access resources for teachers, visit AP United States History Course Home Page. The information below relates ONLY to the exam design and content of the course prior to 2014-15.

Exam Information (AP U.S. History Exam prior to 2014-15)

The first AP U.S. History Exam originally known as “American History” was given in 1956. The exam tests knowledge and skills included in a full-year introductory course in United States history from the first European explorations of the Americas to the present. The exam covers political institutions and behavior, public policy, social and economic change, diplomacy and international relations, and cultural and intellectual development.

For sample multiple-choice questions, questions relating to the exam prior to 2014-15 only, refer to the AP United States History Course Description (.pdf/891KB)

Below are free-response questions from past AP United States History Exams. Included with the questions are scoring guidelines, sample student responses, and commentary on those responses, as well as exam statistics and the Chief Reader’s Student Performance Q A for past administrations.

Other Core Resources

  • AP U.S. History Document-Based Questions, 1973-1999 (.pdf/32.2MB)

Note about “Form B” Exams
Prior to the May 2012 exam administration, for selected AP subjects, another version of the exam called “Form B” was administered outside of North, Central, and South America.

Important Note: PDF Files
The links to exam questions for this course are in Adobe PDF format, and you will need to use the Adobe Acrobat Reader to view them. If you don’t have Acrobat Reader 4.0 or higher installed on your computer, choose the link for the Adobe Web site below for installation instructions.

More About U.S. History

Are You a Student?

See Also.

  • 1 – Home Page
  • 2 – Skip to content
  • 3 – Site Map
  • 4 – Search field focus
  • 6 – Site navigation tree
  • 9 – Contact information
  • 0 – Access Key details

AP Central – The AP Physics B Exam #call #answering #service


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AP Central

AP Physics B is Replaced By Two Courses
We’re excited to announce that AP Physics B is replaced by two new courses: AP Physics 1 and AP Physics 2. The AP Physics B exam was last administered in May 2014. To learn more about the new courses and access resources for teachers and school and district administrators, visit the course page for AP Physics 1 and AP Physics 2.

Exam Information (1999 to 2014)

The AP Physics B Exam covered a full-year non-calculus college course on general physics, intended for students not majoring in a physical science or engineering. The Physics B free response questions, sample student responses, and scoring commentary are resources that can be used by those teaching Physics 1 and Physics 2. Use the curriculum framework to determine the specific concepts for each individual course.

Multiple-Choice Questions (1999 to 2014)

Free-Response Questions (1999 to 2014)

Below are free-response questions from past AP Physics B Exams. Included with the questions are scoring guidelines, sample student responses, and commentary on those responses, as well as exam statistics and the Chief Reader’s Report for past administrations.

Note about “Form B” Exams
Prior to the May 2012 exam administration, for selected AP subjects, another version of the exam called “Form B” was administered outside of North, Central, and South America.


AP Central – The AP Physics 1 Exam #all #questions #answered


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AP Central

Exam Overview

Exam questions are based on learning objectives, which combine science practices with specific content. Students learn to:

  • Solve problems mathematically including symbolically.
  • Design and describe experiments and analyze data and sources of error.
  • Explain, reason, or justify answers with emphasis on deeper, conceptual understanding.
  • Interpret and develop conceptual models.

The Paragraph-Length Response (.pdf/70.5KB) and The Analysis of Experimental Uncertainty (.pdf/72KB) documents provide clarifying information about expectations for student work in AP Physics 1 and 2.

Encourage your students to visit the AP Physics 1 student page for exam information and exam practice.

Policies

A four function, scientific, or graphing calculator is allowed on both sections of the exam. Refer to our calculator policies for more information and for the list of approved graphing calculators.

Exam Format

Section I

Multiple Choice 50 Questions | 1 Hour, 30 Minutes | 50% of Exam Score

  • Individual questions
  • Questions in sets
  • Multiple-select questions (two options are correct)

Section II

Free Response 5 Questions | 1 Hour, 30 Minutes | 50% of Exam Score

  • Experimental Design (1 question)
  • Quantitative/Qualitative Translation (1 question)
  • Short Answer (3 questions, one requiring a paragraph-length argument)

Exam Questions and Scoring Information

Looking for sample multiple-choice and free-response questions? You can find them in:

The Course and Exam Description (.pdf/5.43MB), which has everything you need to know about the course and exam.

A full practice exam on AP Course Audit. Log in to your account and then click on the Secure Documents link within the Resources section of your Course Status page.

Free response questions from past AP Physics B exams. which are still available even though that course has been replaced by AP Physics 1 and 2.

The Student Performance Q
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AP Central – The AP Biology Exam #free #math #answers


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AP Central

Important Updates

New Exam for Classroom Use

A secure 2016 AP Biology Exam is now available on the AP Course Audit website. To access, sign in to your AP Course Audit account, and click on the Secure Documents link in the Resources section of your Course Status page.

Previously Secure Exam Now Publicly Available

A 2013 AP Biology Exam previously available only through your AP Course Audit account is now available on AP Central. This means you can now use the questions from this older exam without restriction.

Exam Day 2017

Exam Duration

Exam Overview

Exam questions assess students’ understanding of the big ideas, enduring understandings, essential knowledge, and learning objectives, and the application of those through the science practices. Questions may cover:

  • the use of modeling to explain biological principles;
  • the use of mathematical processes to explain concepts;
  • the making of predictions and the justification of phenomena;
  • the implementation of experimental design; and
  • the manipulation and interpretation of data

Encourage your students to visit the AP Biology student page for exam information and exam practice.

Policies

A four-function with square root calculator may be used on the exam. Refer to our calculator policies for more information.

Exam Format

Section I

Multiple Choice 69 Questions | 1 Hour, 30 Minutes | 50% of Exam Score

  • Multiple-Choice: 63 Questions
    • Discrete Questions
    • Questions in sets
  • Grid-In: 6 Questions
    • The grid-in questions focus on the integration of science and mathematical skills. For these responses, students need to calculate the correct answer for each question and enter it in a grid on that section of the answer sheet.

Section II

Free Response 8 Questions | 1 Hour, 30 Minutes (includes 10-minute reading period) | 50% of Exam Score

  • Long Free Response (2 questions, one of which is lab or data-based)
  • Short Free Response (6 questions, each requiring a paragraph-length argument/response)

Exam Questions and Scoring Information

Looking for sample multiple-choice and free-response questions? You can find them in:

The Course and Exam Description (.pdf/5.8MB), which has everything you need to know about the course and exam.

A full practice exam on AP Course Audit. Log in to your account and then click on the Secure Documents link within the Resources section of your Course Status page.

An AP Biology Exam from 2013, previously available only through your AP Course Audit account. Since this exam is now publicly available, you can use the questions without restriction.

The pre-2013 exam questions page. Although these questions do not reflect the redesigned exam, the question types are the same and the topics similar, making them a valuable resource for students and teachers.

The Student Performance Q
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AP Central – The Biology Exam Content #equivalent #fractions #answers


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AP Central

More About Biology.

Exam Information (AP Biology Exam from spring 2012 and prior)

The Topic Outline in the Course and Exam Description provides details about the content on the exam. About 25 percent of the multiple-choice questions are likely to be on the subject areas listed under Area I (molecules and cells). Similarly, one of the four essay questions will also be taken from that area; another question will be on Area II (heredity and evolution); and the remaining two questions will be on Area III (organisms and populations). In answering any of the four free-response questions, students may need to analyze and interpret data or information drawn from lab experience (as well as from lecture material) or to integrate material from different areas of the course.

For sample multiple-choice questions, refer to the Course and Exam Description (.pdf/490KB).

Below are free-response questions from past AP Biology Exams. Included with the questions are scoring guidelines, sample student responses, and commentary on those responses, as well as exam statistics and the Chief Reader’s Student Performance Q A for past administrations.

Important Note About the “Form B” Exams
Because of the worldwide growth of the AP Program and the administration of exams in multiple time zones, another version of the AP Biology Exam, called “Form B,” may be administered in order to maintain security.


UK GCE A AS A2 Level Chemistry practice worksheets multiple choice quizzes


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Doc Brown’s Chemistry

A LEVEL CHEMISTRY REVISION

QUIZZES and WORKSHEETS

A Level Multiple Choice Chemistry Quizzes, Structured Questions, Worksheets, Practice Exam Questions etc. for Advanced Level and Subsidiary Advanced Level ChemistryHelp link indexes for GCE Advanced Subsidiary Level AS Advanced Level A2 IB Revise AQA GCE Chemistry OCR GCE Chemistry Edexcel GCE Chemistry Salters Chemistry CIE Chemistry, WJEC GCE AS A2 Chemistry, CCEA/CEA GCE AS A2 Chemistry revising courses for pre-university students (equal to US grade 11 and grade 12 and AP Honours/honors level courses)

Good memories of 6th form teaching at Whitby Community College (1978-2003)

(now Caedmon College, Whitby, North Yorkshire, England)

Copying of the quizzes by schools and colleges etc. is not permitted � Dr Phil Brown

To repeat quizzes with fresh Q’s click on the (Repeat Quiz) button, refresh can cause problems!

icon means multiple choice quiz, icon means a type in answer quiz,

icon means a structured question-worksheet, matching pair quiz

When doing the advanced level chemistry multiple choice quizzes, if you get the answer correct, a YES comes up in the box by the choices A-D. If you get it wrong, a NO appears. However, if your first three answers are incorrect, on the 4th click, which is the answer, nothing appears! This I’m afraid is peculiar quirk, in the otherwise excellent free to use Hot Potato download software I use.

UK Exam syllabuses -specifications help links

The NEW AS/A Level Chemistry Courses that started in September 2015

SYNOPTIC ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUIZZES

General Quiz on type of Organic Molecule Recognition based on examples of structure and recognition of functional groups, including isomers, so the quiz is mainly on recognition of types of molecules and their structural features and classification

A 10Q ALIPHATIC ORGANIC STRUCTURE and NOMENCLATURE BUMPER MULTIPLE CHOICE QUIZ – allow extra download time (600kb) – on most of aliphatic nomenclature based on 7 combined quizzes: alkanes, alkenes, haloalkanes, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives (amides, esters, acyl chlorides etc.).

Type in name ALIPHATIC ORGANIC NOMENCLATURE BUMPER QUIZ– on most of aliphatic nomenclature based on 6 combined quizzes: alkanes, alkenes, haloalkanes, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives (amides, acid chlorides, esters etc.)

A set of organic chemistry synthesis questions suitable for the end of advanced level chemistry courses

The 7 exercises are based on functional group chemistry and presented as a jumbled mix of molecules and reaction conditions reagents to sort out into a correct MEANINGFUL sequence in five minutes! You are not told either the starting molecule or the final product!

ISOMERISM in ORGANIC MOLECULES

ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY TOPIC QUESTIONS

ADVANCED THEORETICAL PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY TOPIC QUESTIONS

MISCELLANEOUS AS-A2 Questions

Elements of Life (limited development) (For Salters unit EL)

From Minerals to Elements (under development) (For Salters unit M)

GCE A AS A2 IB Advanced Level Chemistry Revision Website

multiple choice quiz * type in short answer quiz * structure question

* matching pairs quiz * multi-word/number fill worksheet

mixed up sequence to sort out * links to other material

UK Exam syllabuses -specifications help links

The NEW AS/A Level Chemistry Courses that started in September 2015

Good memories of 6th form teaching at Whitby Community College

(now Caedmon College, Whitby, North Yorkshire, England)

The very good Salters Year 13 A Level Chemistry Group 1995-1996 Whitby Community College (now Caedmon College, Whitby). From left to right: Che Gannarelli (now Dr, science-physics teacher ?), Graham. (?), Georgia. (?), Finn Nesbitt (Locum Consultant Anaesthetist ?), Doc B (retired 2003, heading for 70), Dan. (?), Pam Scott (civil servant), Amy. (?), Kerry. (?). Below is the Whitby Community chemistry laboratory where I worked for many years, all laid out in 1995-1996 for the upper 6th A level chemistry group (above) to do their Salters A-level chemistry project.


AP Central – The AP Chemistry Exam #physics #problems #and #answers


#chemistry answers

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AP Central

Exam Information (AP Chemistry Exam from spring 2013 and prior)

The AP Chemistry Exam covers a full-year introductory college course in chemistry with laboratory. The multiple-choice questions in Section I cover the breadth of the curriculum. Section II, the free-response part of the exam, includes three quantitative problems, one question on writing chemical reactions and predicting products, and two essays. One of the questions in Section II is based on laboratory; this question can either be a quantitative problem in Part A or an essay in Part B. There is no choice among the questions; all students must answer all six questions.

Below are free-response questions from past AP Chemistry Exams. Included with the questions are scoring guidelines, sample student responses, and commentary on those responses as well as exam statistics and the Chief Reader’s Student Performance Q A for past administrations.

Note about “Form B” Exams
Prior to the May 2012 exam administration, for selected AP subjects, another version of the exam called “Form B” was administered outside of North, Central, and South America.

Calculators are allowed on the free-response section for the first 55 minutes. During that time, students will work on three required problems. For the last 40 minutes, calculators must be put away as students work on the remaining free-response questions.

For the first 55 minutes, any programmable or graphing calculator may be used, with a few exceptions, and students are not required to erase their calculator memories before and after the exam. Although most calculators are permitted on the free-response section, calculators may not be shared with other students and those with typewriter-style (qwerty) keyboards will not be permitted on any part of the exam.

The free-response section emphasizes solving in-depth problems and writing essays where knowledge of which principles to apply and how to apply them is the most important aspect of the solution to these problems.

Previously Released Materials
These older Released Exams were designed to support teachers’ instruction of their students. They are now used for educator instructional purposes only.

Sample Questions Scoring Guidelines
The AP Chemistry Exam covers a full-year introductory college course in chemistry with laboratory. The multiple-choice questions in Section I cover the breadth of the curriculum. Section II, the free-response part of the exam, includes three quantitative problems, one question on writing chemical reactions and predicting products, and two essays.


How to Write a Good Answer to Exam Essay Questions #wordly #wise


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How to Write a Good Answer to Exam Essay Questions

Answering essay questions on an exam can be difficult and stressful, which can make it hard to provide a good answer. However, you can improve your ability to answer essay questions by learning how to understand the questions, form an answer, and stay focused. Developing your ability to give excellent answers on essay exams will take time and effort, but you can learn some good essay question practices and start improving your answers.

Steps Edit

Part One of Three:
Understanding the Question Edit

Read the question carefully. Before you get started, make sure that you have read the essay question twice and that you understand what you need to do. Underline or highlight the most important words or phrases in the question to help you stay focused on answering the question. [1]

Identify the key words. Teachers and professors use certain key words in essay questions to communicate what they want you to do. For example, an essay question that asks you to “describe” an issue will be different from an essay question that asks you to “argue” a position. Make sure that you identify the key word in each essay question you read. Some of the most common key words include: [2]

  • Analyze: Explain the what, where, who, when, why, and how. Include pros and cons, strengths and weaknesses, etc.
  • Compare: Discuss the similarities and differences between two or more things. Don’t forget to explain why the comparison is useful.
  • Contrast: Discuss how two or more things are different or distinguish between them. Don’t forget to explain why the contrast is useful.
  • Define: State what something means, does, achieves, etc.
  • Describe: List characteristics or traits of something. You may also need to summarize something, such as an essay prompt that asks “Describe the major events that led to the American Revolution.”
  • Discuss: This is more analytical. You usually begin by describing something and then present arguments for or against it. You may need to analyze the advantages or disadvantages of your subject.
  • Evaluate: Offer the pros and cons, positives and negatives for a subject. You may be asked to evaluate a statement for logical support, or evaluate an argument for weaknesses.
  • Explain: Explain why or how something happened, or justify your position on something.
  • Prove: Usually reserved for more scientific or objective essays. You may be asked to include evidence and research to build a case for a specific position or set of hypotheses.
  • Summarize: Usually, this means to list the major ideas or themes of a subject. It could also ask you to present the main ideas in order to then fully discuss them. Most essay questions will not ask for pure summary without anything else.

Ask questions if anything is unclear. If you do not understand what the question is asking or if you are unsure about the meaning of the key word, ask your teacher or professor. Do not attempt to answer the question until you fully understand what you are supposed to do. Otherwise, you may end up providing an incorrect answer. [3]

  • Raise your hand and wait for your teacher to come over to you or approach your teacher’s desk to ask your question. This way you will be less likely to disrupt other test takers.

Stop and take a deep breath if you get too anxious. It is crucial to stay calm when you are taking an essay exam. If you get flustered, you may have trouble recalling important information or you may make simple mistakes.

  • If you get to a point during the exam where you feel too anxious to focus, put down your pencil (or take your hands off of the keyboard), close your eyes, and take a deep breath. Stretch your arms and imagine that you are somewhere pleasant for a few moments. When you have completed this brief exercise, open up your eyes and resume the exam. [11]

Use your time wisely. Some exams may suggest how much time you should spend on each question or even give you a time limit for each question. Having suggestions and limits like these may help you to budget your time. If you exam does not provide a guide for how much time to spend on each question, develop your own time budget at the beginning of the exam. [12]

  • For example, if the exam period is one hour long and you have to answer three questions in that time frame, then you should plan to spend no more than 20 minutes on each question.
  • Look at the weight of the questions, if applicable. For example, if there are five 10-point short-answers and a 50-point essay, plan to spend more time on the essay because it is worth significantly more. Don’t get stuck spending so much time on the short-answers that you don’t have time to develop a complex essay.

Write as quickly as you can. While you do not want to write so fast that you are not thinking about your answers, remember that you are on the clock. Consider the question and plan your answers well, but then try to write your answers as quickly as you can. [13]

  • This strategy is even more important if the exam has multiple essay questions. If you take too much time on the first question, then you may not have enough time to answer the other questions on the exam.

Stay on topic. While it is okay to let your mind wander a bit when you are writing a formal essay, you need to stay focused on the question when you write an essay exam response. Otherwise, you may end up providing unnecessary information and losing points for not including the information that was required. [14]

  • If feel like you are straying away from the question, reread the question and review any notes that you made to help guide you. After you get refocused, then continue writing your answer.
  • Try to allow yourself enough time to go back and tighten up connections between your points. A few well-placed transitions can really bump up your grade.