Economics dictionary definition, economics defined, economics answers.#Economics #answers


economics

Economics answers

An example of economics is the study of the stock market.

economics

Economics answers

Origin of economics

from obsolete singular n. economic + -s (sense ); patterned on Classical Greek ta oikonomika, household management, title of treatise by Aristotle from neuter plural of oikonomikos, skilled in household management from oikonomia: see economy

economics

Economics answers

  1. used with a sing. verb The social science that deals with the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services and with the theory and management of economies or economic systems.
  2. used with a sing. or pl. verb Economic matters, especially relevant financial considerations: Economics are slowly killing the family farm ( Christian Science Monitor )

economics

Economics answers

aphnology Rare . the science of wealth; plutology. autarky a national policy of economic self-sufficiency or independence. autarkist, n . autarkie, autarkical, adj . bilateralism the practice of promoting trade between two countries through agreements concerning quantity and price of commodities. Cf. multilateralism. bilateralistic, adj . boycottism the principles behind, and means of carrying out, a boycott. boycotter, n . cameralism the theories and adherence to the theories of the cameralists. cameralist, n . cameralistic. adj . cameralist a mercantilist economist of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries who believed in the doctrine that a nation s wealth could be made greater by increasing its supply of money. cameralistic, adj . capitalism a system of economics under which ownership of and investment in the means of production and distribution depends chiefly upon corporations and private individuals. capitalist, n . capitalistic, adj . cartelism the practice of controlling production and prices by agreements between or among international companies. cartel, n . chrysology the study of the production of wealth, especially as attained from precious metals. Cobdenism the economic doctrines of Richard Cobden (1804-65), who believed in peace and the withdrawal from European competition for balance of power. Colbertism the mercantilist theories of Jean Colbert in the 17th century, especially his advocacy of high protective tariffs. commercialism 1. the principles, practice, and spirit of commerce. 2. an excessive emphasis on high profit, commercial success, or immediate results. 3. a commercial custom, practice, or expression. commercialist, n . commercialistic, adj . consumerism the principles and practices associated with the utilization of economic goods. disintermediation an economic phenomenon of the late 1970s and early 1980s in which investors, flnding that conventional savings and thrift methods did not pay sufficient interest to keep pace with inflation, transferred their funds to the money market and related savings and investment instruments, leading to a rapid growth in those resources and a loss of funds from institutions like savings banks. economese language and jargon typical of economists and the field of economics. econometrics mathematical methods used in the science of economics to prove and develop economic theories. economics the study of the production, use, and consumption of goods and services in society. economie, economical, adj . economist, n . economism a theory or doctrine that attaches principal importance to economic goals. economist, n . Fabianism a late 19th-century English movement that favored the gradual development of socialism by peaceful means. Fabian, n., adj . Fordism the theory of Henry Ford stating that production efficiency is dependent on successful assembly-line methods. industrialism a system of social and economic organization based upon highly mechanized industry. industrialist, n., adj . inflationism the quality of advocating economic inflation. inflationist, n . joint stockism the principle of contribution and division of capital or stock by a number of persons. Keynesianism the economic theories of John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946), English economist, and his advocates, especially his emphasis upon deficit spending by government to stimulate business investment. Keynesian, n., adj . laissez-faireism the economic doctrine that the government should intervene as little as possible in economic affairs. laissez-faireist, n., adj . macroeconomics the division of economics dealing with broad, general aspects of an economy, as the import-export balance of a nation as a whole. Cf. microeconomics. macroeconomist, n . macroeconomic, adj . Malthusianism the theories of Thomas Malthus (1766-1834), English economist, stating that population growth tends to increase faster than production and that food and necessities will be in short supply unless population growth is restricted or war, disease, and famine intervene. Malthusian, n., adj . Manchesterism the policies and principles of an English school of economists based in Manchester. Manchesterist, n . mercantilism a political and economic policy seeking to advance a state above others by accumulating large quantities of precious metals and by exporting in large quantity while importing in small. mercantilist, n . mercantilistic, adj . microeconomics the division of economics dealing with particular aspects of an economy, as the price-cost relationship of a business. Cf. macroeconomies. microeconomist, n . microeconomic, adj . monetarism 1. an economic theory maintaining that stability and growth in the economy are dependent on a steady growth rate in the supply of money. 2. the principle put forward by American economist Milton Friedman that control of the money supply and, thereby, of rate in the supply of credit serves to control inflation and recession while fostering prosperity. monetarist, n., adj . multilateralism the practice of promoting trade among several countries through agreements concerning quantity and price of commodities, as the Common Market, and, sometimes, restrictive tariffs on goods from outsiders. nationalization the act or process of the taking over of private industry by government. See also government. Neo-Malthusianism the belief that the use of contraceptives as a means of lowering the population will eliminate such adverse elements as vice and elevate the Standard of living. Neo-Malthusian, n., adj . Owenism the principles of social and labor reform along communistic lines developed by Robert Owen (1771-1858). Owenite, n . pastoralism the herding or tending of cattle as a primary economic activity or occupation. Also pasturage. pastoralist, n . pastoral, adj . plutology the branch of economics that studies wealth; theoretical economics. Also called plutonomy. privatization the act or process of transferring to private ownership industry operated by a government, of ten industry that has been nationalized. See also government. protectionism the theory or practice of a method of fostering or developing industry through restrictive tariffs on foreign imports. protectionist, n., adj . Reaganomics the economic theories and policies of the administration of President Ronald Reagan (1981- ), basically a policy of supply-side economics with emphasis on defense spending, encouragement of private and corporate development and investment, and reduction in government spending on social services. Ricardian a believer in the economic theories of David Ricardo, English economist, especially that rental income is an economic surplus. Ricardian, adj . Saint-Simonism the theory of the Comte de Saint-Simon (1760-1825), who proposed a socialism in which all property and production be state-controlled with distribution on the basis of an individual s job and ability. Saint-Simonist, n .

economics

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What students say about The Economics Tutor

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“Exceptional Tutor with Tips and Tricks to write more Rigorous and Extensive Economics Essays.”

Economics answers

“Wonderful teacher. No student is left behind. Uses many analogies to teach difficult concepts.”

Economics answers

“Exceptional Teacher! Economics Began To Make Sense! Detailed Explanations With Real World Applications.”

Who can deliver Top Quality Economics Tuition?

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Qualifications Awards

1st Class Honours in Economics

2 PSC Scholarship Awards

Winner of Many Top Academic Awards :

  • Dean’s List every year
  • University of Singapore Economics Society Book Prize (for being the Top Student in Economics for the entire undergraduate examinations)
  • Paul Sherwood Memorial Book Prize (for being the Top Student in Economics in the 2nd Year)
  • NUS Silver Medalist (2nd Most Outstanding Academic Results in Entire Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences)
  • Raffles Institution Merit Book Prize
  • Represented the NUS emerged Finalist in an International EconomicsJournal (Essay) Competition (UAUJE) out of thousands of contestants worldwide

Received Offers from both NUS NTU to join their Economics Faculty

“His (Mr Hong’s) academic prowess earned the respect of both his peers and his teachers.” – Testimonial by Jamie Reeves, renowned economics teacher from RJC former Director of Humanities Programme in RI/RJC

Economics answers

Experiences

Almost 20 years Economics Tuition experience

Former member of the Singapore Government Administrative Service, possessing Economics Policy Experience

Successful Entrepreneur, possessing unique Micro-Economics experience

Former Chairman of National Economics Quiz Committee

Secretariat Subcomm Member, Economic Review Committee 2001

Trained Top Business Executives including in seminar organised by the Singapore Business Federation

1 of only 4 youths selected to represent Singapore in regional Young Leaders’ Initiative

Qualifications Awards

1st Class Honours in Economics

2 PSC Scholarship Awards

Winner of Many Top Academic Awards:

  • Dean’s List every year
  • University of Singapore Economics Society Book Prize (for being the Top Student in Economics for the entire undergraduate examinations)
  • Paul Sherwood Memorial Book Prize (for being the Top Student in Economics in the 2nd Year)
  • NUS Silver Medalist (2nd Most Outstanding Academic Results in Entire Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences)
  • Raffles Institution Merit Book Prize
  • Represented the NUS emerged Finalist in an International EconomicsJournal (Essay) Competition (UAUJE) out of thousands of contestants worldwide

Received Offers from both NUS NTU to join their Economics Faculty

“His (Mr Hong’s) academic prowess earned the respect of both his peers and his teachers.” – Testimonial by Jamie Reeves, renowned economics teacher from RJC former Director of Humanities Programme in RI/RJC

Experiences

Almost 20 years Economics Tuition experience

Former member of the Singapore Government Administrative Service, possessing Economics Policy Experience

Successful Entrepreneur, possessing unique Micro-Economics experience

Former Chairman of National Economics Quiz Committee

Secretariat Subcomm Member, Economic Review Committee 2001

Trained Top Business Executives including in seminar organised by the Singapore Business Federation

1 of only 4 youths selected to represent Singapore in regional Young Leaders’ Initiative


Economics Exam Questions, Economics Exam Answers, economics answers.#Economics #answers


Economics Wiki

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Below is a compiled list of economics exam answers and quiz answers. If you are going to use this economics exam answers resource, it would be appreciated if you would Share this page on Facebook, Tweet this page or Google + this page. These help increase the awareness of the resource and allow the page to continue to stay up.

1. Which of the following is most likely to be an implicit cost for Company X?

A. forgone rent from the building owned and used by Company X

B. rental payments on IBM equipment

C. payments for raw materials purchased from Company Y

D. transportation costs paid to a nearby trucking firm

2. To the economist, total cost includes:

A. explicit and implicit costs, including a normal profit.

C. implicit, but not explicit, costs.

D. explicit, but not implicit, costs.

3. Suppose that a business incurred implicit costs of $200,000 and explicit costs of $1 million in a specific year. If the firm sold 4,000 units of its output at $300 per unit, its accounting profits were:

A. $100,000 and its economic profits were zero.

B. $200,000 and its economic profits were zero.

C. $100,000 and its economic profits were $100,000.

D. zero and its economic loss was $200,000.

4. Which of the following is a short-run adjustment?

A. A local bakery hires two additional bakers.

B. Six new firms enter the plastics industry.

C. The number of farms in the United States declines by 5 percent.

D. BMW constructs a new assembly plant in South Carolina.

5. The short run is characterized by:

A. plenty of time for firms to either enter or leave the industry.

B. increasing, but not diminishing returns.

C. fixed plant capacity.

D. zero fixed costs.

6. The law of diminishing returns indicates that:

A. as extra units of a variable resource are added to a fixed resource, marginal product will decline beyond some point.

B. because of economies and diseconomies of scale a competitive firm s long-run average total cost curve will be U-shaped.

C. the demand for goods produced by purely competitive industries is downsloping.

D. beyond some point the extra utility derived from additional units of a product will yield the consumer smaller and smaller extra amounts of satisfaction.

Answer the question on the basis of the following output data for a firm. Assume that the amounts of all non-labor resources are fixed.

7. Refer to the above data. Diminishing marginal returns become evident with the addition of the:

B. fourth worker.

D. second worker.

8. Refer to the above data. The marginal product of the sixth worker is:

A. 180 units of output.

B. 30 units of output.

9. In the above diagram curves 1, 2, and 3 represent the:

A. average, marginal, and total product curves respectively.

B. marginal, average, and total product curves respectively.

C. total, average, and marginal product curves respectively.

D. total, marginal, and average product curves respectively.

10. Refer to the above diagram. At output level Q total variable cost is:

Answer the question on the basis of the following cost data:

11. Refer to the above data. The total variable cost of producing 5 units is:

12. Refer to the above data. The average total cost of producing 3 units of output is:

13. Refer to the above data. The marginal cost of producing the sixth unit of output is:

14. In the above figure, curves 1, 2, 3, and 4 represent the:

A. ATC, MC, AFC, and AVC curves respectively.

B. MC, AFC, AVC, and ATC curves respectively.

C. MC, ATC, AVC, and AFC curves respectively.

D. ATC, AVC, AFC, and MC curves respectively.

15. In the long run:

A. all costs are variable costs.

B. all costs are fixed costs.

C. variable costs equal fixed costs.

D. fixed costs are greater than variable costs.

16. In which of the following market structures is there clear-cut mutual interdependence with respect to price-output policies?

A. pure monopoly

C. monopolistic competition

D. pure competition

17. Which of the following industries most closely approximates pure competition?

B. farm implements

18. A purely competitive seller is:

A. both a price maker and a price taker.

B. neither a price maker nor a price taker.

19. The MR = MC rule applies:

A. to firms in all types of industries.

B. only when the firm is a price taker.

C. only to monopolies.

D. only to purely competitive firms.

20. Assume the XYZ Corporation is producing 20 units of output. It is selling this output in a purely competitive market at $10 per unit. Its total fixed costs are $100 and its average variable cost is $3 at 20 units of output. This corporation:

A. should close down in the short run.

B. is maximizing its profits.

C. is realizing a loss of $60.

D. is realizing an economic profit of $40.

Answer the question on the basis of the following data confronting a firm:

21. Refer to the above data. This firm is selling its output in a(n):

A. monopolistically competitive market.

B. monopolistic market.

C. purely competitive market.

D. oligopolistic market.

22. Refer to the above data. If the firm s minimum average variable cost is $10, the firm s profit-maximizing level of output would be:

23. Refer to the above diagram for a purely competitive producer. The lowest price at which the firm should produce (as opposed to shutting down) is:

24. Refer to the above diagram. To maximize profit or minimize losses this firm will produce:

Answer the question on the basis of the following cost data for a firm that is selling in a purely competitive market:

25. Refer to the above data. If the market price for the firm s product is $12, the competitive firm will produce:

A. 4 units at a loss of $109.

B. 4 units at an economic profit of $31.75.

C. 8 units at a loss of $48.80.

D. zero units at a loss of $100.

26. Refer to the above data. If the market price for the firm s product is $32, the competitive firm will produce:

A. 8 units at an economic profit of $16.

B. 6 units at an economic profit of $7.98.

C. 10 units at an economic profit of $4.

D. 7 units at an economic profit of $41.50.

27. Refer to the above diagram. At P2, this firm will:

A. produce 44 units and realize an economic profit.

B. produce 44 units and earn only a normal profit.

D. shut down in the short run.

28. Refer to the above diagram. At P1, this firm will produce:

A. 47 units and break even.

B. 47 units and realize an economic profit.


IB Economics (and, not only), economics answers.#Economics #answers


IB Economics (and, not only)

economics is a dirty job but someone’s got to do it

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Where is the trade-off?

Economics answers

This inverse relationship was first detected by a New Zealand economist (first a crocodile hunter then an electrical engineer and later an economist at the LSE – see Wikipedia) when studying the UK annual unemployment rate and the annual percentage change in money wages: when the labor market was tight (so unemployment was low) then money wages would tend to rise. If prices were a mark-up on costs / wages, then if unemployment decreased, prices would tend to increase. This pattern was detected for many countries but if the trade-off was stable then policymakers could ‘choose’ the most desirable unemployment-inflation combination and with demand side policies try to achieve it. Some started talking even about ‘fine-tuning’ the economy which was anathema to Milton Friedman and the monetarists (this always sounds to me like a band. ). In any case, Friedman’s ingenuity came up with the ‘expectations-augmented Phillips curve’ where there is no trade-off in the long run (defined as when expected inflation and actual inflation are equal). In the long run there is only one rate of inflation compatible with non-accelerating inflation and that is the ‘equilibrium’ unemployment rate which (again, ingeniously) Friedman called the ‘natural rate of unemployment’.

To make a long story short, the US unemployment has been steadily decreasing for some time and for many has approached or even exceeded the NRU so many have been expecting increases in money wages as well as increases in the average price level i.e. inflation.

But. not the case! The question is what should the Fed do? Should it slowly tighten monetary policy to avoid a jump in inflation and thus a greater increase in interest rates? But if there is still no risk of inflation for whatever reason? Then growth would just slow down and people who could have found a job will remain unemployed. The Fed has increased interest rates a bit but unemployment was still deceasing while inflation was still below the (totally arbitrary – see this excellent article) 2% goal!

Which bring us to this New York Times editorial Why is the Fed so scared of inflation which is definitely worth reading.

Economics answersAs Fed officials try to make sense of how low unemployment, which should drive up wages and prices, persists side by side with low inflation, most simply assume that inflation will rise by next year as labor demand lifts wages and higher wages lead to rising prices. This belief has led to two interest rate increases so far this year, in effect tapping the brakes on growth to fight inflation, with another rate increase expected this year. A more plausible view is that persistently low inflation shows the economy is more fragile than policy makers want to admit, and needs to be helped, not handicapped. (the photo is from an FOMC meeting) A simple exposition of the basics of the Phillips Curve for the IB HL Economics candidate can be found at my Economics Study Guide here or here or here (Oxford University Press)


Economics, Economist – World News, Politics, Economics, Business & Finance, economics answers.#Economics


Economics

  • Economics answers

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  • Economics answers

    Neolithic societies were far more egalitarian 11

  • Economics answers

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    The devices have helped poor countries leapfrog much more than landline telephony 6

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    Both monetary-policy and fiscal-policy answers remain contentious 27

    A new study by the IMF finds no strong correlation between lower taxes and higher growth 5

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    America’s 31st president overcame extraordinary obstacles, but the Great Depression overwhelmed him 2

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    The process of withdrawing monetary stimulus is fraught with danger 3

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    Jean-Baptiste Say explained that if you build it, they will come 18

    Latest updates

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    Economics answers

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    Erasmus November 24th, 12:48

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  • How to Get Good Grades in Economics (with Pictures), economics answers.#Economics #answers


    How to Get Good Grades in Economics

    To do well in economics, you must develop a deep understanding of economic theories, developments in the field, and applied math. Stay current by reading newspapers and magazines like the Financial Times and The Economist. To ace your classes, take good notes, form a study group, and ask for assistance when necessary.

    Steps Edit

    Part One of Four:

    Getting to Know Economics Edit

    Economics answers

    Economics answers

    Economics answers

    Part Two of Four:

    Being a Diligent Student in Class Edit

    Economics answers

    Economics answers

    Economics answers

    Economics answers

    Economics answers


    IB Economics (and, not only), economics answers.#Economics #answers


    IB Economics (and, not only)

    economics is a dirty job but someone’s got to do it

    Tuesday, August 22, 2017

    Where is the trade-off?

    Economics answers

    This inverse relationship was first detected by a New Zealand economist (first a crocodile hunter then an electrical engineer and later an economist at the LSE – see Wikipedia) when studying the UK annual unemployment rate and the annual percentage change in money wages: when the labor market was tight (so unemployment was low) then money wages would tend to rise. If prices were a mark-up on costs / wages, then if unemployment decreased, prices would tend to increase. This pattern was detected for many countries but if the trade-off was stable then policymakers could ‘choose’ the most desirable unemployment-inflation combination and with demand side policies try to achieve it. Some started talking even about ‘fine-tuning’ the economy which was anathema to Milton Friedman and the monetarists (this always sounds to me like a band. ). In any case, Friedman’s ingenuity came up with the ‘expectations-augmented Phillips curve’ where there is no trade-off in the long run (defined as when expected inflation and actual inflation are equal). In the long run there is only one rate of inflation compatible with non-accelerating inflation and that is the ‘equilibrium’ unemployment rate which (again, ingeniously) Friedman called the ‘natural rate of unemployment’.

    To make a long story short, the US unemployment has been steadily decreasing for some time and for many has approached or even exceeded the NRU so many have been expecting increases in money wages as well as increases in the average price level i.e. inflation.

    But. not the case! The question is what should the Fed do? Should it slowly tighten monetary policy to avoid a jump in inflation and thus a greater increase in interest rates? But if there is still no risk of inflation for whatever reason? Then growth would just slow down and people who could have found a job will remain unemployed. The Fed has increased interest rates a bit but unemployment was still deceasing while inflation was still below the (totally arbitrary – see this excellent article) 2% goal!

    Which bring us to this New York Times editorial Why is the Fed so scared of inflation which is definitely worth reading.

    Economics answersAs Fed officials try to make sense of how low unemployment, which should drive up wages and prices, persists side by side with low inflation, most simply assume that inflation will rise by next year as labor demand lifts wages and higher wages lead to rising prices. This belief has led to two interest rate increases so far this year, in effect tapping the brakes on growth to fight inflation, with another rate increase expected this year. A more plausible view is that persistently low inflation shows the economy is more fragile than policy makers want to admit, and needs to be helped, not handicapped. (the photo is from an FOMC meeting) A simple exposition of the basics of the Phillips Curve for the IB HL Economics candidate can be found at my Economics Study Guide here or here or here (Oxford University Press)


    Economics, Economist – World News, Politics, Economics, Business & Finance, economics answers.#Economics


    Economics

    • Economics answers

    Douglas Irwin agrees that trade policy is important. But all manner of powers are wrongly laid at its door 0

    Neolithic societies were far more egalitarian 0

  • Economics answers

    Neolithic societies were far more egalitarian 11

  • Economics answers

    A new accounting rule for credit losses is about to kick in 5

    Without connectivity, nothing moves 0

    On globalisation, mussels, Russia, politics 3

  • Economics answers

    As it sinks in the West, the faith is finding new followers elsewhere 17

  • Economics answers

    The devices have helped poor countries leapfrog much more than landline telephony 6

    It is the corporate-bond market they should worry about 4

  • Economics answers

    But the gap is closing 18

  • Economics answers

    Both monetary-policy and fiscal-policy answers remain contentious 27

    A new study by the IMF finds no strong correlation between lower taxes and higher growth 5

  • Economics answers

    America’s 31st president overcame extraordinary obstacles, but the Great Depression overwhelmed him 2

  • Economics answers

    Time for fresh thinking about the changing economics of geography 153

  • Economics answers

    What can be done to help them? 103

  • Economics answers

    An IMF report does not really support Jeremy Corbyn s plans; it is more nuanced 42

  • Economics answers

    With ultra-loose monetary policy coming to an end, it is best to tread carefully 85

    The process of withdrawing monetary stimulus is fraught with danger 3

  • Economics answers

    Labour plans to use Margaret Thatcher’s methods to overturn the Thatcher revolution 19

  • Economics answers

    That crucial Franco-German axis will matter even more 3

  • Economics answers

    Opposites don’t attract 36

  • Economics answers

    The Fed has announced it will shed assets, but not how many 49

  • Economics answers

    Jean-Baptiste Say explained that if you build it, they will come 18

    Latest updates

    Economics answers

    Graphic detail November 24th, 18:00

    Economics answers

    Prospero November 24th, 17:05

    Economics answers

    Erasmus November 24th, 12:48

    Economics answers

    Science and technology November 24th, 10:29

    Economics answers

    The Economist explains November 24th, 6:54

    Economics answers

    Prospero November 23rd, 15:26

    Economics answers


  • How to Get Good Grades in Economics (with Pictures), economics answers.#Economics #answers


    How to Get Good Grades in Economics

    To do well in economics, you must develop a deep understanding of economic theories, developments in the field, and applied math. Stay current by reading newspapers and magazines like the Financial Times and The Economist. To ace your classes, take good notes, form a study group, and ask for assistance when necessary.

    Steps Edit

    Part One of Four:

    Getting to Know Economics Edit

    Economics answers

    Economics answers

    Economics answers

    Part Two of Four:

    Being a Diligent Student in Class Edit

    Economics answers

    Economics answers

    Economics answers

    Economics answers

    Economics answers


    Kelvin Hong, Top Economics Tutor in Sg, Economics Tuition, JC IB, economics


    Kelvin Hong

    Economics answers

    Economics answers

    Economics answers

    • Economics answers
    • Economics answers
    • Economics answers
    • Economics answers

    What students say about The Economics Tutor

    Economics answers

    “Exceptional Tutor with Tips and Tricks to write more Rigorous and Extensive Economics Essays.”

    Economics answers

    “Wonderful teacher. No student is left behind. Uses many analogies to teach difficult concepts.”

    Economics answers

    “Exceptional Teacher! Economics Began To Make Sense! Detailed Explanations With Real World Applications.”

    Who can deliver Top Quality Economics Tuition?

    Economics answers

    Qualifications Awards

    1st Class Honours in Economics

    2 PSC Scholarship Awards

    Winner of Many Top Academic Awards :

    • Dean’s List every year
    • University of Singapore Economics Society Book Prize (for being the Top Student in Economics for the entire undergraduate examinations)
    • Paul Sherwood Memorial Book Prize (for being the Top Student in Economics in the 2nd Year)
    • NUS Silver Medalist (2nd Most Outstanding Academic Results in Entire Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences)
    • Raffles Institution Merit Book Prize
    • Represented the NUS emerged Finalist in an International EconomicsJournal (Essay) Competition (UAUJE) out of thousands of contestants worldwide

    Received Offers from both NUS NTU to join their Economics Faculty

    “His (Mr Hong’s) academic prowess earned the respect of both his peers and his teachers.” – Testimonial by Jamie Reeves, renowned economics teacher from RJC former Director of Humanities Programme in RI/RJC

    Economics answers

    Experiences

    Almost 20 years Economics Tuition experience

    Former member of the Singapore Government Administrative Service, possessing Economics Policy Experience

    Successful Entrepreneur, possessing unique Micro-Economics experience

    Former Chairman of National Economics Quiz Committee

    Secretariat Subcomm Member, Economic Review Committee 2001

    Trained Top Business Executives including in seminar organised by the Singapore Business Federation

    1 of only 4 youths selected to represent Singapore in regional Young Leaders’ Initiative

    Qualifications Awards

    1st Class Honours in Economics

    2 PSC Scholarship Awards

    Winner of Many Top Academic Awards:

    • Dean’s List every year
    • University of Singapore Economics Society Book Prize (for being the Top Student in Economics for the entire undergraduate examinations)
    • Paul Sherwood Memorial Book Prize (for being the Top Student in Economics in the 2nd Year)
    • NUS Silver Medalist (2nd Most Outstanding Academic Results in Entire Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences)
    • Raffles Institution Merit Book Prize
    • Represented the NUS emerged Finalist in an International EconomicsJournal (Essay) Competition (UAUJE) out of thousands of contestants worldwide

    Received Offers from both NUS NTU to join their Economics Faculty

    “His (Mr Hong’s) academic prowess earned the respect of both his peers and his teachers.” – Testimonial by Jamie Reeves, renowned economics teacher from RJC former Director of Humanities Programme in RI/RJC

    Experiences

    Almost 20 years Economics Tuition experience

    Former member of the Singapore Government Administrative Service, possessing Economics Policy Experience

    Successful Entrepreneur, possessing unique Micro-Economics experience

    Former Chairman of National Economics Quiz Committee

    Secretariat Subcomm Member, Economic Review Committee 2001

    Trained Top Business Executives including in seminar organised by the Singapore Business Federation

    1 of only 4 youths selected to represent Singapore in regional Young Leaders’ Initiative