Cheat for True or False – All Answers on the App Store


#true or false answers

#

Cheat for True or False – All Answers

This app is designed for both iPhone and iPad

  • Category: Reference
  • Released: Jul 19, 2013
  • Version: 1.0
  • Size: 42.1 MB
  • Language: English
  • Seller: PBJ Studios
  • © PBJ Studios
  • Compatibility: Requires iOS 5.1 or later. Compatible with iPhone 4, iPhone 4s, iPhone 5, iPhone 5c, iPhone 5s, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, iPhone SE, iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, iPad 2 Wi-Fi, iPad 2 Wi-Fi + 3G, iPad Wi-Fi (3rd generation), iPad Wi-Fi + Cellular (3rd generation), iPad Wi-Fi (4th generation), iPad Wi-Fi + Cellular (4th generation), iPad mini Wi-Fi, iPad mini Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad Air, iPad Air Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad mini 2, iPad mini 2 Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad Air 2, iPad Air 2 Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad mini 3, iPad mini 3 Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad mini 4, iPad mini 4 Wi-Fi + Cellular, 12.9-inch iPad Pro, 12.9-inch iPad Pro Wi-Fi + Cellular, 9.7-inch iPad Pro, 9.7-inch iPad Pro Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPod touch (4th generation), iPod touch (5th generation), and iPod touch (6th generation).

    Customer Ratings

    We have not received enough ratings to display an average for the current version of this application.

    More by PBJ Studios


    Cheat Sheet to Your Best Interview Answers #question #answer #sms


    #job interview answers

    #

    When preparing for your next job interview, you ll want to have answers to these common job interview questions. These answers are just a guideline to follow. The most important thing to do is to be honest and be yourself when answering these job interview questions.

    1. Tell me about yourself.

    Perhaps this the most common and famous interview question of all interview question. Tell me about yourself is the gateway to just about anything to wish to say which is why it can be tricky. When asked the question, the interviewer doesn t want to know where you were born or what color your hair it. This question prompts an answer that gives the interviewer a general answer of why you would be good for this job. Your answer may reveal some of your greatest achievements or how your past experience might relate to the job you are applying for.

    2. Why would I hire you?

    For this answer you need to realize that the better answer you give, the easier it is for the employer. It s up to you so give the employer a reason to hire you. This is a great time to tell the interviewer about any past work experience you have. You might say, When I was working at XXX, I did XXX. I feel that experience will allow me to excel at this position I am applying for. Even better, think of a specific example or story to tell about a situation you have been in before and how that could be useful to the company.

    3. What are you strengths

    Figure out 2-3 things about yourself that you really like about yourself and elaborate. Always give an example after you say your strength. For example, you may say you are dedicated. Then you should follow up with an instance when at your last you job, you had an important project due and you worked extra hours to make sure it got done.

    4. What are your weaknesses?

    When answering the classic weakness question. you always want to give an answer that isn t really a weakness. You may say, I don t speak a second language, or when I start a project, I can t focus on anything else until I get it done. This shows that you are dedicated and hard working. You never want to truly bash yourself when answering this question. That isn t the point. The following examples here are easy to discuss and can lead to talking about future growth and learning.

    5. What is the most important thing to you in a job?

    If there is something really important for you to have in a job, be honest and say it. Remember, a job interview is a tool to reveal the best fit for the company. If something is really important to you that the company doesn t offer, it is best to reveal it now.

    6. What are you career goals?

    Employers want to know this to see what positions you might grow into later on if you were to be hired. They also want to know this to see how long you might stay with the company if hired. The company may be looking for a candidate they can groom into their next Senior VP. However, you are only looking for a job to cover you for the next couple of years, it might not be the best match.

    7. Do you have any questions for me?

    Do your research ahead of time and if you truly have a question, ask it. When you ask legitimate, relevant questions, you show the interviewer you put in time to research beforehand. However, don t ever ask questions, just to ask questions or to look good. The interviewer will sense your lack of authenticity right away and that may hurt your chances. Make the time to think of an intelligent question about the job before hand. You may ask, What is a typical day like for this position? You can also ask, What opportunity for advancement does this position have?

    8. Why did you leave your last job?

    Whatever the reason was, tell the story of why is was mutually beneficial for you to leave the company. Never blurt out, I got fired, and end it at that. It makes you look bad and can even make the interviewer feel uncomfortable. Prepare an honest story with a logical reason that doesn t reveal too much personal information or company gossip. If you did get fired, you can use this as an opportunity to discuss what you lessons you learned and what you would now do differently.

    Related


    How to Cheat on Homework or Online Classes #answers #to #math #questions


    #how to get answers for homework

    #

    Tutoring & Homework Help
    Math, Chemistry, Physics, Etc.


    How to Cheat on Homework or Online Classes

    Internet Search for Homework Answers. Free Help. How to Send Homework by Email. How to Cheat at Online Classes
    My view of homework help (homework cheating):
    As a tutor, I try to ask students to learn the material and ask me questions that they are having trouble with. However!. I understand that most students taking college algebra, physics, or chemistry will seldom use the information in those courses and I would rather see someone get on with their life and get a job than get held back. Does a guidance counselor ever use the formula for an ellipse or convert grams to moles or calculate the trajectory of an arrow shot from a bow at an angle of 33.2 degrees above the horizon with an initial speed of 42.8 m/s? NO! So while some people might look down on homework help or homework cheating, I don’t see it as a huge sin and those who do can jump in a lake (with piranhas!).

    I warn students that they typically need to know the material to pass their class exams, so please don’t view this as a complete “get out of jail free card”. Also turning in A+ homework and getting F’s on an exam is a give-away that you are cheating. Be careful.

    I offer one of the least expensive homework help services that I know of. It averages out to about $15 to $20 per hour. See details on the homepage: www.tutor-homework.com .

    Various Methods of “Homework Cheating”:

    Doing an Internet Search for Homework Answers
    If you are at this page, I’m sure you’re aware of the power of doing a Google or Yahoo search. And you probably also know that if you’re searching for the answer to a specific question, just type double quotes around your search query.

    For example: suppose you are searching for an answer to this question.

    How long does it take for a car traveling at a speed of 50.0 miles per hour to travel 300 feet?

    You can copy and paste the question into a search engine and you will get back thousands, possibly millions, of results, many of them trying to sell you a new car (ha ha). To narrow your search, put double quotes around the question.

    Sometimes the words of the question might stay the same, but the numerical values might change. For example the 50.0 miles per hour in the question above might be switched to 55.0 miles per hour, so you might try a search for only the text part in double quotes.

    Free Help – you get what you pay for.
    There are also many Q & A services on the internet that will do your homework for you. There are some free services that will help you with a few questions, but if you have a lot of questions, you will have a tough time finding someone to “help” you through them all for free. One service for quick answers is answers.yahoo.com. Most of the people who answer questions there are trying to help you to learn and will not just do your homework for you! And there is no guarantee you’ll get the right answer to your homework question.

    How to copy homework questions from your book or website and email them to a tutor:
    It is a real pain just typing your questions to email them to a tutor, and if there are a lot of mathematical formulas and/or diagrams, this is next to impossible!
    Instead what you should do is scan your questions, saving them as a pdf or jpg file (and perhaps insert the jpg files into MS Word). If you don’t have a scanner, your school might have one in the computer center. Or you could try a copy shop like Kinko’s or something (although Kinko’s is overpriced and if you can find a small independent copy shop you’ll likely get a better deal). Save your file as a pdf or jpg, but make sure the file isn’t too large. 250 to 300 kb per each graphic should be fine. Emails don’t usually handle file sizes of more than 4 or 5 megabytes.

    If your homework is online you can either use “copy and paste” or a screen capture. See details here for screen captures: Copying Questions for Homework Help. Screen capture is often the preferred method because if your website questions have a lot of graphics, “copy and paste” will not work because Microsoft just hasn’t figured out how to copy a webpage into MS Word so that all the graphics get included. Also copying any tables from a website and pasting them into MS Word typically eats up computer memory like mad. So to keep an information in your question from being lost (like graphics getting dropped when you do a cut and paste) and to make sure MS Word doesn’t get hung up on the tables, doing a screen capture is often your best bet!

    Screen capture not working?
    If this is the case it’s likely that the online class website designers know how to block this command. However there are screen capture programs made that can override this. It’s a lot of trouble, but there it is. You just have to know how to outsmart the computer.

    Using a Secure Browser?
    If your school makes you use a secure browswer when doing your online work so that you cannot Google or email or chat with a tutor, then you might need to use a 2nd computer. You might be able to take a picture of the exam questions on your computer with a camera and then email the pictures to a tutor.

    Cheating at online classes:
    If your class is one of those that are entirely online — even the exams!– from your own home, then cheating is easy! Some students give out their login names and passwords to tutors or homework help services and ask them to take the class for them. I don’t recommend this. In fact I’ve known students to be ripped off by these homework help services and if the student tries to get their money back, the “tutor” threatens to tell the student’s university! Also, if a website administrator sees that the login IP address came from India or even from a state or province far from where you live, you can get caught! I’ve never heard of this happening, but it’s possible. What I would recommend is that you login from your computer and send the questions to a tutor through email or instant messenger. This takes a little more time, but is a bit safer.

    If you do decide to pay someone to log in for you and complete your class, only pay a little bit as you go. DO NOT PAY THE ENTIRE SUM TO ANY TUTOR OR HOMEWORK HELP SERVICE. unless you just like getting ripped off. In fact, I know of a student who paid a very large sum to a tutor, only the tutor did not do the work and when the student asked for his money back, the “tutor” said he would tell the student’s school if the student tried to get his money back. Also, credit card companies usually do not refund for services not rendered, they only do that for goods (like not getting something your ordered in the mail.)

    Be smart and know the tutor you are dealing with — call them, speak to them.

    If you need help from me, my number is 918-850-5925 (Tulsa, OK) and my name is David Roth.


    Cheat for True or False – All Answers on the App Store


    #true or false answers

    #

    Cheat for True or False – All Answers

    This app is designed for both iPhone and iPad

  • Category: Reference
  • Released: Jul 19, 2013
  • Version: 1.0
  • Size: 42.1 MB
  • Language: English
  • Seller: PBJ Studios
  • © PBJ Studios
  • Compatibility: Requires iOS 5.1 or later. Compatible with iPhone 4, iPhone 4s, iPhone 5, iPhone 5c, iPhone 5s, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, iPhone SE, iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, iPad 2 Wi-Fi, iPad 2 Wi-Fi + 3G, iPad Wi-Fi (3rd generation), iPad Wi-Fi + Cellular (3rd generation), iPad Wi-Fi (4th generation), iPad Wi-Fi + Cellular (4th generation), iPad mini Wi-Fi, iPad mini Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad Air, iPad Air Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad mini 2, iPad mini 2 Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad Air 2, iPad Air 2 Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad mini 3, iPad mini 3 Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPad mini 4, iPad mini 4 Wi-Fi + Cellular, 12.9-inch iPad Pro, 12.9-inch iPad Pro Wi-Fi + Cellular, 9.7-inch iPad Pro, 9.7-inch iPad Pro Wi-Fi + Cellular, iPod touch (4th generation), iPod touch (5th generation), and iPod touch (6th generation).

    Customer Ratings

    We have not received enough ratings to display an average for the current version of this application.

    More by PBJ Studios


    Cheat Sheet to Your Best Interview Answers #wikipedia #question #and #answer


    #job interview answers

    #

    When preparing for your next job interview, you ll want to have answers to these common job interview questions. These answers are just a guideline to follow. The most important thing to do is to be honest and be yourself when answering these job interview questions.

    1. Tell me about yourself.

    Perhaps this the most common and famous interview question of all interview question. Tell me about yourself is the gateway to just about anything to wish to say which is why it can be tricky. When asked the question, the interviewer doesn t want to know where you were born or what color your hair it. This question prompts an answer that gives the interviewer a general answer of why you would be good for this job. Your answer may reveal some of your greatest achievements or how your past experience might relate to the job you are applying for.

    2. Why would I hire you?

    For this answer you need to realize that the better answer you give, the easier it is for the employer. It s up to you so give the employer a reason to hire you. This is a great time to tell the interviewer about any past work experience you have. You might say, When I was working at XXX, I did XXX. I feel that experience will allow me to excel at this position I am applying for. Even better, think of a specific example or story to tell about a situation you have been in before and how that could be useful to the company.

    3. What are you strengths

    Figure out 2-3 things about yourself that you really like about yourself and elaborate. Always give an example after you say your strength. For example, you may say you are dedicated. Then you should follow up with an instance when at your last you job, you had an important project due and you worked extra hours to make sure it got done.

    4. What are your weaknesses?

    When answering the classic weakness question. you always want to give an answer that isn t really a weakness. You may say, I don t speak a second language, or when I start a project, I can t focus on anything else until I get it done. This shows that you are dedicated and hard working. You never want to truly bash yourself when answering this question. That isn t the point. The following examples here are easy to discuss and can lead to talking about future growth and learning.

    5. What is the most important thing to you in a job?

    If there is something really important for you to have in a job, be honest and say it. Remember, a job interview is a tool to reveal the best fit for the company. If something is really important to you that the company doesn t offer, it is best to reveal it now.

    6. What are you career goals?

    Employers want to know this to see what positions you might grow into later on if you were to be hired. They also want to know this to see how long you might stay with the company if hired. The company may be looking for a candidate they can groom into their next Senior VP. However, you are only looking for a job to cover you for the next couple of years, it might not be the best match.

    7. Do you have any questions for me?

    Do your research ahead of time and if you truly have a question, ask it. When you ask legitimate, relevant questions, you show the interviewer you put in time to research beforehand. However, don t ever ask questions, just to ask questions or to look good. The interviewer will sense your lack of authenticity right away and that may hurt your chances. Make the time to think of an intelligent question about the job before hand. You may ask, What is a typical day like for this position? You can also ask, What opportunity for advancement does this position have?

    8. Why did you leave your last job?

    Whatever the reason was, tell the story of why is was mutually beneficial for you to leave the company. Never blurt out, I got fired, and end it at that. It makes you look bad and can even make the interviewer feel uncomfortable. Prepare an honest story with a logical reason that doesn t reveal too much personal information or company gossip. If you did get fired, you can use this as an opportunity to discuss what you lessons you learned and what you would now do differently.

    Related


    How to Cheat on Homework or Online Classes #crossword #answer


    #how to get answers for homework

    #

    Tutoring & Homework Help
    Math, Chemistry, Physics, Etc.


    How to Cheat on Homework or Online Classes

    Internet Search for Homework Answers. Free Help. How to Send Homework by Email. How to Cheat at Online Classes
    My view of homework help (homework cheating):
    As a tutor, I try to ask students to learn the material and ask me questions that they are having trouble with. However!. I understand that most students taking college algebra, physics, or chemistry will seldom use the information in those courses and I would rather see someone get on with their life and get a job than get held back. Does a guidance counselor ever use the formula for an ellipse or convert grams to moles or calculate the trajectory of an arrow shot from a bow at an angle of 33.2 degrees above the horizon with an initial speed of 42.8 m/s? NO! So while some people might look down on homework help or homework cheating, I don’t see it as a huge sin and those who do can jump in a lake (with piranhas!).

    I warn students that they typically need to know the material to pass their class exams, so please don’t view this as a complete “get out of jail free card”. Also turning in A+ homework and getting F’s on an exam is a give-away that you are cheating. Be careful.

    I offer one of the least expensive homework help services that I know of. It averages out to about $15 to $20 per hour. See details on the homepage: www.tutor-homework.com .

    Various Methods of “Homework Cheating”:

    Doing an Internet Search for Homework Answers
    If you are at this page, I’m sure you’re aware of the power of doing a Google or Yahoo search. And you probably also know that if you’re searching for the answer to a specific question, just type double quotes around your search query.

    For example: suppose you are searching for an answer to this question.

    How long does it take for a car traveling at a speed of 50.0 miles per hour to travel 300 feet?

    You can copy and paste the question into a search engine and you will get back thousands, possibly millions, of results, many of them trying to sell you a new car (ha ha). To narrow your search, put double quotes around the question.

    Sometimes the words of the question might stay the same, but the numerical values might change. For example the 50.0 miles per hour in the question above might be switched to 55.0 miles per hour, so you might try a search for only the text part in double quotes.

    Free Help – you get what you pay for.
    There are also many Q & A services on the internet that will do your homework for you. There are some free services that will help you with a few questions, but if you have a lot of questions, you will have a tough time finding someone to “help” you through them all for free. One service for quick answers is answers.yahoo.com. Most of the people who answer questions there are trying to help you to learn and will not just do your homework for you! And there is no guarantee you’ll get the right answer to your homework question.

    How to copy homework questions from your book or website and email them to a tutor:
    It is a real pain just typing your questions to email them to a tutor, and if there are a lot of mathematical formulas and/or diagrams, this is next to impossible!
    Instead what you should do is scan your questions, saving them as a pdf or jpg file (and perhaps insert the jpg files into MS Word). If you don’t have a scanner, your school might have one in the computer center. Or you could try a copy shop like Kinko’s or something (although Kinko’s is overpriced and if you can find a small independent copy shop you’ll likely get a better deal). Save your file as a pdf or jpg, but make sure the file isn’t too large. 250 to 300 kb per each graphic should be fine. Emails don’t usually handle file sizes of more than 4 or 5 megabytes.

    If your homework is online you can either use “copy and paste” or a screen capture. See details here for screen captures: Copying Questions for Homework Help. Screen capture is often the preferred method because if your website questions have a lot of graphics, “copy and paste” will not work because Microsoft just hasn’t figured out how to copy a webpage into MS Word so that all the graphics get included. Also copying any tables from a website and pasting them into MS Word typically eats up computer memory like mad. So to keep an information in your question from being lost (like graphics getting dropped when you do a cut and paste) and to make sure MS Word doesn’t get hung up on the tables, doing a screen capture is often your best bet!

    Screen capture not working?
    If this is the case it’s likely that the online class website designers know how to block this command. However there are screen capture programs made that can override this. It’s a lot of trouble, but there it is. You just have to know how to outsmart the computer.

    Using a Secure Browser?
    If your school makes you use a secure browswer when doing your online work so that you cannot Google or email or chat with a tutor, then you might need to use a 2nd computer. You might be able to take a picture of the exam questions on your computer with a camera and then email the pictures to a tutor.

    Cheating at online classes:
    If your class is one of those that are entirely online — even the exams!– from your own home, then cheating is easy! Some students give out their login names and passwords to tutors or homework help services and ask them to take the class for them. I don’t recommend this. In fact I’ve known students to be ripped off by these homework help services and if the student tries to get their money back, the “tutor” threatens to tell the student’s university! Also, if a website administrator sees that the login IP address came from India or even from a state or province far from where you live, you can get caught! I’ve never heard of this happening, but it’s possible. What I would recommend is that you login from your computer and send the questions to a tutor through email or instant messenger. This takes a little more time, but is a bit safer.

    If you do decide to pay someone to log in for you and complete your class, only pay a little bit as you go. DO NOT PAY THE ENTIRE SUM TO ANY TUTOR OR HOMEWORK HELP SERVICE. unless you just like getting ripped off. In fact, I know of a student who paid a very large sum to a tutor, only the tutor did not do the work and when the student asked for his money back, the “tutor” said he would tell the student’s school if the student tried to get his money back. Also, credit card companies usually do not refund for services not rendered, they only do that for goods (like not getting something your ordered in the mail.)

    Be smart and know the tutor you are dealing with — call them, speak to them.

    If you need help from me, my number is 918-850-5925 (Tulsa, OK) and my name is David Roth.


    Solving Cryptic Crosswords For Dummies Cheat Sheet (Australian Edition) #question #answers


    #cryptic crossword answers

    #

    Solving Cryptic Crosswords For Dummies Cheat Sheet (Australian Edition)

    Cryptic crosswords are often seen as a challenging puzzle form — delight may be rare to anyone new to this type of brain teaser! On first reading, the clues can seem to be made up of complete gibberish. However, cryptic crosswords actually conform to a set of rules and they can be solved! In this Cheat Sheet, you will discover some handy pointers on how cryptic clues go together, the basics of the main cryptic devices, and a brief introduction to cryptic abbreviations often found in clues.

    Understanding Cryptic Clue Anatomy

    While they do look completely incomprehensible at first glance, cryptic clues are actually written along set guidelines. The majority of clues in a cryptic crossword adhere to these standards:

    Every cryptic clue includes a straight definition of the answer, just like in a ‘regular’ crossword. It’s astonishing, but true!

    The definition part of the clue will always be at the start or end of the clue, and never sandwiched in the middle.

    Most cryptic clues run along the lines of this formula: Definition + Wordplay = Answer (or Wordplay + Definition = Answer).

    The wordplay is the (hopefully) fun part, and can use one, or a combination of, about 8 or 9 main clue types. Wordplay devices include anagrams, reversals, deletions and so on.

    The definition part of a cryptic clue may be a straightforward dictionary definition, or a more oblique or unusual definition.

    Identifying the definition section of the clue is a vital part of solving a cryptic clue. Once you think you’ve pinned it down, the remainder of the clue is automatically the wordplay!

    Many cryptic clues include ‘indicator words’, which are a word or a short phrase that tells you what sort of wordplay is being used in the clue.

    Getting to Grips with Cryptic Crossword Devices

    There are about eight main types of wordplay devices used in cryptic crossword clues and a bunch of less common ones. Here you’ll find the basic points of the main devices.

    An anagram is a device where the letters from one word, or a few words, are jumbled up to form another word (the answer to the clue). For example, TRIMS CASH is an anagram of CHRISTMAS.

    The letters to be rearranged are in clear view in the clue. These words are called the anagram ‘fodder’. Abbreviations are occasionally included in the anagram fodder.

    An anagram clue has to have an anagram indicator, which tells you some words in the clue have to be rearranged. There are hundreds of possible anagram indicators. Any word that gives the impression of something being broken, confused and so on, could be one!

    The longest words in the crossword grid are very often clued with anagrams.

    A charade clue is one where one part is added to another to get the answer. For example, CARAWAY can be clued as a charade of CAR + AWAY.

    The parts that are added together are typically synonyms, words ‘in the clear’ (words seen in the clue without needing to find a synonym), or abbreviations, or combinations of these.

    Charades don’t generally have indicator words. They occasionally have linking words such as with, has, and, and similar, to join the parts.

    Charades are a common clue device and can be used in conjunction with other clue devices.

    All cryptic crosswords include at least some, if not many, charade clues.

    The container clue device is one set of letters, or a short word, put inside another word.

    Indicator words are used in the containment device, and will indicate that you need to put one thing inside another. Just a few examples: aboard, among, breaking and within.

    Container clues can also be clued as one word out around another word.

    The sorts of indicator words used give a sense of surrounding, such as astride, clutching, eating, going around, outside, protecting, and wrapping. The parts to be put together are usually synonyms of words in the clue, abbreviations, or a combination of these.

    This is a very common device, and can be used in conjunction with other clue devices.

    A deletion cryptic device is one or a few letters being deleted from another word, to get to the answer. For example, END can be clued as MEND M, or FRIEND FRI, or …

    An indicator word or two is always needed in a deletion clue. These are words which give a sense (not surprisingly) of something being deleted. A few examples: abandoned, almost, cut, excluding, forgetting, lacking, leaving, missing, not, shed, wanting, without.

    Letter position is sometimes indicated in these clues (first, middle, last, half, etc). This is a common cryptic device, and can be used in conjunction with other devices.

    Reversals are a cryptic device where one word, or a part of a word, is reversed to get to the answer. For example, OGRE is ERGO reversed.

    Indicator words give a sense of something being reversed, such as backfiring, back to front, coming back, contrary, go around, inverted, recalled, and spun.

    * Down clues can also have reversal indicators that give a sense of words rising upwards, such as ascending, elevated, hoisted, raised, and skyward.

    Reversals are a common device, and can be used in conjunction with other devices.

    Homophones are words that sound like other words, but are spelt differently. For example, BOW and BEAU are homophones.

    Homophone clues have indicator words that give a sense that something needs to be heard, spoken, or broadcast. Some examples: aloud, audibly, by the sound of it, declared, for the listener, I hear, in speech, on the radio, orally, and verbal.

    This is a less common device, and a crossword will generally have only a few or even none.

    In a double definition clue, there are simply two different definitions for the answer put next to each other. For example, DESERT can mean an arid sandy place, or to abandon someone.

    Double definition clues vary from the usual “Wordplay + Definition = Answer” equation. Their equation is “Definition 1 + Definition 2 = Answer”.

    Indicator words are not generally used, although sometimes a linking word or two is used, such as and, but, from, gives, makes, or that .

    This is a moderately common cryptic device, so keep an eye out for them!

    The letters of the answer are in plain sight, in a hidden word clue! They are sitting within other words of the clue. For example, the word TENT can be hidden in kitTEN Temper.

    Indicator words are used, these will give a sense of containment, such a bit of, buried in, concealed by, essentially, from, held by, in part, sample of, or within. Container indicator words can also be used.

    Sometimes the alternate letters of a word are indicated. These can be indicated an instruction to look at the alternate, regular, odd, or even letters of a word in the clue.

    This is a less common cryptic device, as these clues are relatively easy to solve.

    Cryptic definition clues are different from the standard cryptic equation. In a cryptic definition clue, the whole clue works as a funny or quirky definition for the answer. There isn’t any wordplay in the usual sense of the word, and there aren’t any indicator words. For example, a wicked thing is a cryptic definition for CANDLE (because it has a wick, groan).

    A question or exclamation mark is often used at the end of these clues.

    These clues are seen in most cryptics; some setters use them a lot, some use them a little.

    Tackling Abbreviations Used in Cryptic Crossword Clues

    Abbreviations are widely used in cryptic clues, and many clue devices use them. You will come across abbreviations in charade, container, reversion and deletion clues in particular, and in some anagram clues.

    Cryptic abbreviations can often trip up new solvers, so gaining some familiarity with these is a great way to improve your cryptic solving skills. There are hundreds of possible abbreviations, so reference lists are definitely handy.

    Many cryptic abbreviations are quite straightforward and in common use. For example: north = N, left = L, oxygen = O, and that is = IE. The phonetic alphabet is often used (foxtrot = F, sierra = S, etc), as well as musical symbols (soft = P, for piano, loud = F, for forte, soprano = S etc) and cricketing terms (duck = O, from a score of 0, run out = RO etc).

    However, there are a bunch of abbreviations that are decidedly odd, and which you really need to be told about to understand. These can really present stumbling blocks to the uninitiated! A lot of these are British, and come from an earlier time when cryptics were first developed (in the 1940s and 1950s). Many of these abbreviations stem from British divisions in the World Wars, or from school boy slang.

    As an example of this, meal ticket = LV (luncheon voucher, part of a WWII scheme in the UK), main road = MI (looks like M1), lines = BR (British Rail), and beware = CAVE (from the Latin word for “beware”, which was used as schoolboy slang).

    The best way to spot abbreviations in cryptic clues is to look at each word of a clue in turn, and see if it might lead to a common abbreviation. Looking up single letter entries in any dictionary will provide you with good lists of the common abbreviations. For the more specialised cryptic abbreviations, try using a cryptic crossword dictionary such as Chambers or Bradford’s, or looking for lists online.


    Cryptic Crosswords For Dummies Cheat Sheet (Australian Edition) #job #interview #questions #and


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    Cryptic Crosswords For Dummies Cheat Sheet (Australian Edition)

    People love to do puzzles of all kinds, but cryptic crosswords are often seen as a challenging form of entertainment — delight may be rare to anyone new to cryptics! This Cheat Sheet covers the basics of how to start on a cryptic crossword grid, and you’ll also find some handy reference lists and explanations to spotting certain clue devices.

    Making a Start on a Cryptic Crossword

    While they do look completely incomprehensible at first glance, cryptic clues are actually written along strict guidelines. The majority of clues in a cryptic crossword adhere to these standards:

    Every cryptic clue includes a straight definition of the answer, just like in a ‘regular’ crossword. Astonishing, but true!

    The definition part of the clue will always be at the start or end of the clue, and never sandwiched in the middle.

    Most cryptic clues run along the lines of this formula: Definition + Wordplay = Answer, or Wordplay + Definition = Answer.

    The definition may be a straight synonym, or a more oblique reference to the answer.

    There are nine main wordplay devices used in cryptics: anagrams, reversals, deletions, charades, containers, hidden words, double definitions, homophones, and cryptic definitions.

    Abbreviations are used a great deal in cryptic clues, so it’s important to get a handle on these.

    The best way to tackle a cryptic clue is to try to ignore the first impression you get from reading the clue, and look at each word in the clue one by one to see if you can discover the definition and wordplay.

    There’s no need to solve the clues in a crossword in order, just look through the list until you see one that you think you might be able to get out.

    In general, you can ignore the punctuation in a clue — it’s mostly just there to mislead you!

    It’s perfectly okay to use a thesaurus to look for synonyms for the words at the start and end of the clue to see if they reveal the answer (from the definition). You can always work out the wordplay part after the fact, and try to figure out what the setter has done to make the clue work. It’s all part of the learning process!

    Different setters write clues slightly differently, so it’s best to get used to one setter’s style at first, rather than solving cryptics from all over the place.

    Cryptic Crossword Reference List of Common Abbreviations

    Here are some basic abbreviations that are very useful to have by your side when cracking cryptic clues! The list is concise and only focuses on the harder abbreviations. Straightforward abbreviations and simple foreign words have been omitted from this list.

    Spotting Indicator Words When Solving Cryptic Crosswords

    Indicator words are vital words that are found in many (but not all) cryptic clues for crosswords. These are words that indicate the type of wordplay being used, so they’re giving you a sort of coded message about what to do to get to the answer.

    The main clue devices that should always use indicator words are anagrams, containers, hidden words, reversals, deletions and homophones. Double definition and charade clues don’t have to have indicator words, but they are occasionally used. Cryptic definition clues don’t use indicator words, although they are often indicated with a question mark or exclamation mark. (This is one of the few times where you do need to pay attention to the punctuation!).

    Here is a list of the sorts of words you’ll find for these indicator words below. If you can learn to spot indicator words by context, you’ll have more cryptic solving success.

    Anagram indicators: These are words that give a sense of some word or words in the clue being jumbled up. These words can give a sense of things being broken, damaged, cooked, confused, upset, edited, ugly, insane, invented, engineered, out of sorts, designed, mishandled, drunk, built, versatile, rearranged, smashed, askew and so on (ad infinitum?!).

    Container indicators: These are words that give a sense of one thing being put around another thing, or one thing being put inside another thing. So words such as acquiring, keeping, possessing, devouring, hugging, amidst, occupying, getting into and set in can be used.

    Hidden word indicators: Hidden word indicators give a sense of something being found inside something else. Container indicators are often used, too. They may be words like a bit of, buried in, essentially, fragment, held in, part of or sample of .

    Reversal indicators: These indicators tell you to run some letters or a word backwards. They are words that give a sense of reversal (not surprisingly!) such as around, backslide, brought about, come back, flipped over, going west, knocked over or reflected. In down clues, a reversal indicator can give a sense of rising upwards, for example held up, lifted or skyward .

    Deletion indicators: These are words that tell you to delete some letters from a word. They give a sense of removal such as absent, excluding, losing, not, dropped, cut, without or short. Letter positions can also be indicated with deletion clues such as first, head, opener, tail, end, conclusion, half, middle, centre and so on.

    Homophone indicators: These words give a sense of something being listened to or said aloud. They can include words such as on the air, broadcast, I hear, said, declared, audibly, outspoken, reportedly, sounds like and vocal.

    Double definition and charade indicators: These clue devices don’t have to have indicator words, but if they are used, they generally just give a sense of one thing following another, being added to another, or of one thing leading from another. Words such as and, but, in which, makes, provides, next to, joining, on and with may be used.