How to Answer Behavioral Interview Questions – The Muse #answers #to #chemistry


#answer the question

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How to Answer Tell Me About a Time When. Interview Questions

You’ve reviewed your resume. practiced your elevator pitch. and reviewed a few stories you can share during the interview. All is well, and you’re feeling confident. And when the interviewer says, “Tell me about a time you disagreed with your supervisor,” you are ready to go and launch straight into a story about that one time you bravely confronted the director of marketing at your previous company about a new campaign you had a bad feeling about.

Okay, so maybe that doesn’t sound like you—yet. Let’s take a step back and talk about how you can get there.

Pick the Right Story

All these “Tell me about a time when…” questions require stories. As a hiring manager, it’s incredibly unsatisfying to interview someone who has no stories to share. After all, how can someone know what you can do if you can’t talk about what you’ve done? Don’t be that job candidate.

So, how do you find the right stories to share? Go through the job description and highlight all the soft skills that are featured. You’ll likely find things like “ability to work on a team and independently,” “comfort with multitasking,” or “strong communication skills.” Then, come up with an example of a time you demonstrated each of these traits—though keep in mind that you don’t necessarily need a different example for each. In fact, it’s better to come up with stories that are flexible, since you’ll likely have to adapt them to the exact questions anyway.

There are, of course, a few things that interviewers frequently like to ask about that will not be on the job descriptions. Be prepared for “negative” questions, like “Tell me about a time you had to deal with a conflict on your team” or “Tell me about a time you failed.” It’s not that interviewers are out to get you—how you handle conflict and failure are good things to know—it’s just not the best idea to put “must deal with frequent team conflict” in a job description.

Finally, brainstorm a few more questions that could potentially come up based on the position you’re applying for and your particular situation. For example, if you have a big gap on your resume, you’ll want to be prepared to talk about why you’re no longer at your previous job (more on that here ), or if you’re coming into a newly merged department, you should be prepared to discuss a time you’ve been part of a big change.

Make a Statement

Once you have your stories, it’s time to think a little deeper about why these questions are asked in the first place. What does the interviewer actually want to know?

Take a few seconds to think about this before you start answering the question—even if you have the perfect story prepared—so that you can make an appropriate introductory statement about essentially what the moral of your story is going to be. The reason for this is that even though the interviewer is specifically asking you to tell a story, the idea is that he or she will learn something about the way you do things. The problem with this is that what the interviewer gleans from your story could be very different from what you were hoping to share.

For example, say you tell that story about standing up to the director of marketing when asked to talk about conflict with a previous supervisor. You eloquently move through the story about how you shared your hesitation about the new marketing campaign to no avail, but once the initial numbers came in, it was clear that you were right. You triumphantly showed the performance to the director, and she agreed to scrap the campaign. While this story is definitely suitable, there are actually a few different ways it could be taken the wrong way. The interviewer could hone in on the fact that you really didn’t do anything until it was too late or that you were unpersuasive or a poor communicator the first time you raised concerns about the campaign.

To make sure your stories are as effective as possible, make a statement before you start telling the story. In this particular example, it might be something like this, “I learned early on in my professional career that it’s fine to disagree if you can back up your hunches with data.” Now, when you tell your story, it’s not about the various ways you could have approached the situation better, but about how you learned from that experience and how you use it to inform future disagreements.

Finish Strong

So, when it comes to these behavioral questions, have some stories prepared and then practice framing them based on the question you’re asked. Practice, practice, practice, and you’ll sound like a natural in no time. The final piece of the puzzle is wrapping up your answers well. You don’t want to ruin your perfect frame and story by ending your response with, “And… yeah.”

Instead, try connecting the story back to the company or position. Quickly explaining how your experience would be useful in the position you’re interviewing for is always a strong way to wrap up. Another way to finish up a response is to give the “in short” version of the answer. For example, “In short, it’s not that I’m an amazing multitasker—I just set and review my priorities frequently.” Wrapping up an interview answer (see more in-depth tips here ) is such a commonly neglected area of preparation, but it can really help you nail the “strong communicator” impression, so don’t disregard it when you’re practicing.

The thing people assume about these questions is that they’re all about the story. And, yes, that is a critical component. But even if your story isn’t exactly what the interview question asked for, if it’s framed well and you go the extra mile to tell the interviewer what he or she should take away from it, you’ll actually end up making a stronger impression.

So, don’t stress too much about having the perfect stories lined up or the exact relevant experience. Instead, focus on the messages you’re trying to communicate to the hiring manager, and back them up with the stories that you have.

Photo of quote courtesy of Shutterstock .

More from this Author

Meet The Author

More from this Author

Hmmm, seems you ve already signed up for this class. While you re here, you may as well check out all the amazing companies that are hiring like crazy right now.


How to Answer Behavioral Interview Questions – The Muse #ask #questions #and


#answer the question

#

How to Answer Tell Me About a Time When. Interview Questions

You’ve reviewed your resume. practiced your elevator pitch. and reviewed a few stories you can share during the interview. All is well, and you’re feeling confident. And when the interviewer says, “Tell me about a time you disagreed with your supervisor,” you are ready to go and launch straight into a story about that one time you bravely confronted the director of marketing at your previous company about a new campaign you had a bad feeling about.

Okay, so maybe that doesn’t sound like you—yet. Let’s take a step back and talk about how you can get there.

Pick the Right Story

All these “Tell me about a time when…” questions require stories. As a hiring manager, it’s incredibly unsatisfying to interview someone who has no stories to share. After all, how can someone know what you can do if you can’t talk about what you’ve done? Don’t be that job candidate.

So, how do you find the right stories to share? Go through the job description and highlight all the soft skills that are featured. You’ll likely find things like “ability to work on a team and independently,” “comfort with multitasking,” or “strong communication skills.” Then, come up with an example of a time you demonstrated each of these traits—though keep in mind that you don’t necessarily need a different example for each. In fact, it’s better to come up with stories that are flexible, since you’ll likely have to adapt them to the exact questions anyway.

There are, of course, a few things that interviewers frequently like to ask about that will not be on the job descriptions. Be prepared for “negative” questions, like “Tell me about a time you had to deal with a conflict on your team” or “Tell me about a time you failed.” It’s not that interviewers are out to get you—how you handle conflict and failure are good things to know—it’s just not the best idea to put “must deal with frequent team conflict” in a job description.

Finally, brainstorm a few more questions that could potentially come up based on the position you’re applying for and your particular situation. For example, if you have a big gap on your resume, you’ll want to be prepared to talk about why you’re no longer at your previous job (more on that here ), or if you’re coming into a newly merged department, you should be prepared to discuss a time you’ve been part of a big change.

Make a Statement

Once you have your stories, it’s time to think a little deeper about why these questions are asked in the first place. What does the interviewer actually want to know?

Take a few seconds to think about this before you start answering the question—even if you have the perfect story prepared—so that you can make an appropriate introductory statement about essentially what the moral of your story is going to be. The reason for this is that even though the interviewer is specifically asking you to tell a story, the idea is that he or she will learn something about the way you do things. The problem with this is that what the interviewer gleans from your story could be very different from what you were hoping to share.

For example, say you tell that story about standing up to the director of marketing when asked to talk about conflict with a previous supervisor. You eloquently move through the story about how you shared your hesitation about the new marketing campaign to no avail, but once the initial numbers came in, it was clear that you were right. You triumphantly showed the performance to the director, and she agreed to scrap the campaign. While this story is definitely suitable, there are actually a few different ways it could be taken the wrong way. The interviewer could hone in on the fact that you really didn’t do anything until it was too late or that you were unpersuasive or a poor communicator the first time you raised concerns about the campaign.

To make sure your stories are as effective as possible, make a statement before you start telling the story. In this particular example, it might be something like this, “I learned early on in my professional career that it’s fine to disagree if you can back up your hunches with data.” Now, when you tell your story, it’s not about the various ways you could have approached the situation better, but about how you learned from that experience and how you use it to inform future disagreements.

Finish Strong

So, when it comes to these behavioral questions, have some stories prepared and then practice framing them based on the question you’re asked. Practice, practice, practice, and you’ll sound like a natural in no time. The final piece of the puzzle is wrapping up your answers well. You don’t want to ruin your perfect frame and story by ending your response with, “And… yeah.”

Instead, try connecting the story back to the company or position. Quickly explaining how your experience would be useful in the position you’re interviewing for is always a strong way to wrap up. Another way to finish up a response is to give the “in short” version of the answer. For example, “In short, it’s not that I’m an amazing multitasker—I just set and review my priorities frequently.” Wrapping up an interview answer (see more in-depth tips here ) is such a commonly neglected area of preparation, but it can really help you nail the “strong communicator” impression, so don’t disregard it when you’re practicing.

The thing people assume about these questions is that they’re all about the story. And, yes, that is a critical component. But even if your story isn’t exactly what the interview question asked for, if it’s framed well and you go the extra mile to tell the interviewer what he or she should take away from it, you’ll actually end up making a stronger impression.

So, don’t stress too much about having the perfect stories lined up or the exact relevant experience. Instead, focus on the messages you’re trying to communicate to the hiring manager, and back them up with the stories that you have.

Photo of quote courtesy of Shutterstock .

More from this Author

Meet The Author

More from this Author

Hmmm, seems you ve already signed up for this class. While you re here, you may as well check out all the amazing companies that are hiring like crazy right now.


Substance Abuse Treatment Program – Bronx, New York City – Montefiore Medical


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Substance Abuse Treatment Program

New Directions Recovery Center

New Directions Recovery Center (aka New Directions) is an outpatient substance abuse treatment program that provides a wide range of supportive services to individuals aged 18 and older who are struggling with active substance use or who are at high risk for relapse. Our dedicated staff of counselors, psychologists, psychiatrists and medical providers work together closely to assist individuals to gain the skills they need to lead productive and drug/alcohol free lives. New Directions offers group and individual counseling, onsite psychological and psychiatric services as well as buprenorphine (Suboxone ) treatment for opioid dependence. We also provide intensive outpatient treatment, services in Spanish, and onsite vocational and nutritional counseling. In addition to our wide range of treatment groups, specialized support groups are available for men, women, Spanish-speakers and those in need of anger management.

New Directions operates during the day and late afternoon to accommodate work and school schedules. We are conveniently located near the Burnside stop on the 4 train and near stops for the Bx40, Bx42 and Bx32 buses.

Walk-in intakes are welcome Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 1pm. Intakes can also be scheduled by calling (917) 564-8780.

New DirectionsRecovery Center
2058 Jerome Avenue, Third Floor
Bronx, NY 10453
(917) 564-8780


Population Health Colloquium #population #health, #population #health #conference, #wellness, #behavioral #health, #analytics,


#

SEVENTEENTH POPULATION
HEALTH COLLOQUIUM


Mary O’Dowd, MPH
Executive Director, Health Systems and Population Health Integration, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ


Jennifer J. Schneider, MD, MS
Chief Medical Officer, Livongo; Former Chief Medical Officer, Castlight Health, Mountain View, CA


Terri Steinberg, MD, MBA
Chief Health Information Officer, Vice President, Population Health Informatics, Christiana Care Health System, New Castle, DE

American Heart Association/American Stroke Association
California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative
Intermountain Healthcare

For updated information, please visit www.Jefferson.edu/HearstHealthPrize .

  • Finalists will present their programs at a special evening poster session on March 27, 2017
  • Winner will be announced on March 28, 2017 at the Population Health Colloquium in Philadelphia
  • The next cycle will open for submissions in Spring 2017

The winner will receive a $100,000 cash prize in recognition of outstanding achievement in managing or improving population health.

SEVENTEENTH POPULATION HEALTH COLLOQUIUM

March 27 – 29, 2017

ONSITE
Loews Philadelphia Hotel
Philadelphia, PA

WEBCAST
In your own office or home live via the Internet
with 24/7 access for six months

COLLOQUIUM BROCHURE
NOW AVAILABLE

DOWNLOAD THE
CONFERENCE APP

Click here to download the conference app.


David B. Nash, MD, MBA, FACP
Dean, Jefferson College of Population Health, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS

Accounting Professionals. Approved for up to 18.00 NASBA CPE credits.

Click here for more information.

The Population Health Colloquium is now offering a limited number of partial and full Tuition Scholarships to qualifying representatives of local, state and federal government, consumer advocate organizations, safety net providers, academics, students and health services research organizations.
Click here for more information.


UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs #substance #abuse, #drug #dependence, #addiction, #treatment, #prevention,


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New Edition of Staying in Touch Manual Now Available!

UCLA ISAP has collaborated with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and the SAMHSA Grantee Data Technical Assistance (GDTA) team to publish Staying in Touch: A Fieldwork Manual of Tracking Procedures (Third Edition) .

Staying in Touch is designed to assist SAMHSA-funded grantees to stay in touch with people receiving services and to meet GPRAMA reporting requirements. The manual includes information on numerous staying-in-touch, tracking, and locating procedures from the simple and inexpensive to the complex and costly.

If you are a current SAMHSA grantee or project officer, you can access Staying in Touch .

Coming soon – downloadable PDF of Staying in Touch for everyone on the SAMHSA website. Watch this space for details!

ISAP, Egypt, and Camels…Oh My!

The 9th Kasr Al-Ainy Annual International Psychiatry Congress brought several ISAP researchers to Cairo, Egypt, in February 2016. Between the discussions about positive psychiatry, treatment strategies for adolescent substance use, psychiatric and addiction comorbidities, concepts of the cognitive behavioral therapy approach, and continuing UCLA’s training efforts with junior Egyptian psychiatrists, we had the privilege to ride camels in front of the amazing Giza pyramids.

From left to right are Rachel Castaneda and family, Jeff Annon, Christine Grella, Sherry Larkins and family, and Valerie Antonini and family. This photo does not include Karen Miotto, Al and Aaron Hasson, and Rick Rawson. All previously rode camels, apparently.


ADHD Wellness Center – ADHD Education, Management and Treatment – The Woodlands,


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IMPROVING CHANGING LIVES

Meet Dawn K. Brown, M.D

New Patient Information

Existing Patients

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ADHD Wellness Center

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Information

Welcome to
ADHD Wellness Center

Changes take place on a daily basis in our personal lives, at work, at school. A lot of things can distract us from completing tasks or pursuing long-term goals. For most people, adjusting to changes and coping with tasks are manageable. For others however, Learning and Behavioral disabilities, more particularly ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), could get in the way of even completing the simplest of tasks. It s okay to fall behind a task or two, but when this becomes more frequent, it could affect family relationships, school performance and even put your job at risk.

At ADHD Wellness Center. we understand what you have to go through, as an adult with ADHD or a parent struggling to deal with a child diagnosed with this learning and behavioral disorder. Through us, you’ll receive sound advice and treatment options to ease the many challenges associated with ADHD.

Our Mission Statement

Our mission is to empower individuals to discover their full potential in life by promoting awareness and education for ADHD management utilizing a structured academic platform, community integration, and treatment care plan. We will provide the highest quality of care to our patients in an environment where they feel supported, validated and well informed.

Client’s Testimonials:

Read our Blog


How to Answer Behavioral Interview Questions – The Muse #answering


#answer the question

#

How to Answer Tell Me About a Time When. Interview Questions

You’ve reviewed your resume. practiced your elevator pitch. and reviewed a few stories you can share during the interview. All is well, and you’re feeling confident. And when the interviewer says, “Tell me about a time you disagreed with your supervisor,” you are ready to go and launch straight into a story about that one time you bravely confronted the director of marketing at your previous company about a new campaign you had a bad feeling about.

Okay, so maybe that doesn’t sound like you—yet. Let’s take a step back and talk about how you can get there.

Pick the Right Story

All these “Tell me about a time when…” questions require stories. As a hiring manager, it’s incredibly unsatisfying to interview someone who has no stories to share. After all, how can someone know what you can do if you can’t talk about what you’ve done? Don’t be that job candidate.

So, how do you find the right stories to share? Go through the job description and highlight all the soft skills that are featured. You’ll likely find things like “ability to work on a team and independently,” “comfort with multitasking,” or “strong communication skills.” Then, come up with an example of a time you demonstrated each of these traits—though keep in mind that you don’t necessarily need a different example for each. In fact, it’s better to come up with stories that are flexible, since you’ll likely have to adapt them to the exact questions anyway.

There are, of course, a few things that interviewers frequently like to ask about that will not be on the job descriptions. Be prepared for “negative” questions, like “Tell me about a time you had to deal with a conflict on your team” or “Tell me about a time you failed.” It’s not that interviewers are out to get you—how you handle conflict and failure are good things to know—it’s just not the best idea to put “must deal with frequent team conflict” in a job description.

Finally, brainstorm a few more questions that could potentially come up based on the position you’re applying for and your particular situation. For example, if you have a big gap on your resume, you’ll want to be prepared to talk about why you’re no longer at your previous job (more on that here ), or if you’re coming into a newly merged department, you should be prepared to discuss a time you’ve been part of a big change.

Make a Statement

Once you have your stories, it’s time to think a little deeper about why these questions are asked in the first place. What does the interviewer actually want to know?

Take a few seconds to think about this before you start answering the question—even if you have the perfect story prepared—so that you can make an appropriate introductory statement about essentially what the moral of your story is going to be. The reason for this is that even though the interviewer is specifically asking you to tell a story, the idea is that he or she will learn something about the way you do things. The problem with this is that what the interviewer gleans from your story could be very different from what you were hoping to share.

For example, say you tell that story about standing up to the director of marketing when asked to talk about conflict with a previous supervisor. You eloquently move through the story about how you shared your hesitation about the new marketing campaign to no avail, but once the initial numbers came in, it was clear that you were right. You triumphantly showed the performance to the director, and she agreed to scrap the campaign. While this story is definitely suitable, there are actually a few different ways it could be taken the wrong way. The interviewer could hone in on the fact that you really didn’t do anything until it was too late or that you were unpersuasive or a poor communicator the first time you raised concerns about the campaign.

To make sure your stories are as effective as possible, make a statement before you start telling the story. In this particular example, it might be something like this, “I learned early on in my professional career that it’s fine to disagree if you can back up your hunches with data.” Now, when you tell your story, it’s not about the various ways you could have approached the situation better, but about how you learned from that experience and how you use it to inform future disagreements.

Finish Strong

So, when it comes to these behavioral questions, have some stories prepared and then practice framing them based on the question you’re asked. Practice, practice, practice, and you’ll sound like a natural in no time. The final piece of the puzzle is wrapping up your answers well. You don’t want to ruin your perfect frame and story by ending your response with, “And… yeah.”

Instead, try connecting the story back to the company or position. Quickly explaining how your experience would be useful in the position you’re interviewing for is always a strong way to wrap up. Another way to finish up a response is to give the “in short” version of the answer. For example, “In short, it’s not that I’m an amazing multitasker—I just set and review my priorities frequently.” Wrapping up an interview answer (see more in-depth tips here ) is such a commonly neglected area of preparation, but it can really help you nail the “strong communicator” impression, so don’t disregard it when you’re practicing.

The thing people assume about these questions is that they’re all about the story. And, yes, that is a critical component. But even if your story isn’t exactly what the interview question asked for, if it’s framed well and you go the extra mile to tell the interviewer what he or she should take away from it, you’ll actually end up making a stronger impression.

So, don’t stress too much about having the perfect stories lined up or the exact relevant experience. Instead, focus on the messages you’re trying to communicate to the hiring manager, and back them up with the stories that you have.

Photo of quote courtesy of Shutterstock .

More from this Author

Meet The Author

More from this Author

Hmmm, seems you ve already signed up for this class. While you re here, you may as well check out all the amazing companies that are hiring like crazy right now.


How to Answer Behavioral Interview Questions – The Muse #mad #gab #phrases


#answer the question

#

How to Answer Tell Me About a Time When. Interview Questions

You’ve reviewed your resume. practiced your elevator pitch. and reviewed a few stories you can share during the interview. All is well, and you’re feeling confident. And when the interviewer says, “Tell me about a time you disagreed with your supervisor,” you are ready to go and launch straight into a story about that one time you bravely confronted the director of marketing at your previous company about a new campaign you had a bad feeling about.

Okay, so maybe that doesn’t sound like you—yet. Let’s take a step back and talk about how you can get there.

Pick the Right Story

All these “Tell me about a time when…” questions require stories. As a hiring manager, it’s incredibly unsatisfying to interview someone who has no stories to share. After all, how can someone know what you can do if you can’t talk about what you’ve done? Don’t be that job candidate.

So, how do you find the right stories to share? Go through the job description and highlight all the soft skills that are featured. You’ll likely find things like “ability to work on a team and independently,” “comfort with multitasking,” or “strong communication skills.” Then, come up with an example of a time you demonstrated each of these traits—though keep in mind that you don’t necessarily need a different example for each. In fact, it’s better to come up with stories that are flexible, since you’ll likely have to adapt them to the exact questions anyway.

There are, of course, a few things that interviewers frequently like to ask about that will not be on the job descriptions. Be prepared for “negative” questions, like “Tell me about a time you had to deal with a conflict on your team” or “Tell me about a time you failed.” It’s not that interviewers are out to get you—how you handle conflict and failure are good things to know—it’s just not the best idea to put “must deal with frequent team conflict” in a job description.

Finally, brainstorm a few more questions that could potentially come up based on the position you’re applying for and your particular situation. For example, if you have a big gap on your resume, you’ll want to be prepared to talk about why you’re no longer at your previous job (more on that here ), or if you’re coming into a newly merged department, you should be prepared to discuss a time you’ve been part of a big change.

Make a Statement

Once you have your stories, it’s time to think a little deeper about why these questions are asked in the first place. What does the interviewer actually want to know?

Take a few seconds to think about this before you start answering the question—even if you have the perfect story prepared—so that you can make an appropriate introductory statement about essentially what the moral of your story is going to be. The reason for this is that even though the interviewer is specifically asking you to tell a story, the idea is that he or she will learn something about the way you do things. The problem with this is that what the interviewer gleans from your story could be very different from what you were hoping to share.

For example, say you tell that story about standing up to the director of marketing when asked to talk about conflict with a previous supervisor. You eloquently move through the story about how you shared your hesitation about the new marketing campaign to no avail, but once the initial numbers came in, it was clear that you were right. You triumphantly showed the performance to the director, and she agreed to scrap the campaign. While this story is definitely suitable, there are actually a few different ways it could be taken the wrong way. The interviewer could hone in on the fact that you really didn’t do anything until it was too late or that you were unpersuasive or a poor communicator the first time you raised concerns about the campaign.

To make sure your stories are as effective as possible, make a statement before you start telling the story. In this particular example, it might be something like this, “I learned early on in my professional career that it’s fine to disagree if you can back up your hunches with data.” Now, when you tell your story, it’s not about the various ways you could have approached the situation better, but about how you learned from that experience and how you use it to inform future disagreements.

Finish Strong

So, when it comes to these behavioral questions, have some stories prepared and then practice framing them based on the question you’re asked. Practice, practice, practice, and you’ll sound like a natural in no time. The final piece of the puzzle is wrapping up your answers well. You don’t want to ruin your perfect frame and story by ending your response with, “And… yeah.”

Instead, try connecting the story back to the company or position. Quickly explaining how your experience would be useful in the position you’re interviewing for is always a strong way to wrap up. Another way to finish up a response is to give the “in short” version of the answer. For example, “In short, it’s not that I’m an amazing multitasker—I just set and review my priorities frequently.” Wrapping up an interview answer (see more in-depth tips here ) is such a commonly neglected area of preparation, but it can really help you nail the “strong communicator” impression, so don’t disregard it when you’re practicing.

The thing people assume about these questions is that they’re all about the story. And, yes, that is a critical component. But even if your story isn’t exactly what the interview question asked for, if it’s framed well and you go the extra mile to tell the interviewer what he or she should take away from it, you’ll actually end up making a stronger impression.

So, don’t stress too much about having the perfect stories lined up or the exact relevant experience. Instead, focus on the messages you’re trying to communicate to the hiring manager, and back them up with the stories that you have.

Photo of quote courtesy of Shutterstock .

More from this Author

Meet The Author

More from this Author

Hmmm, seems you ve already signed up for this class. While you re here, you may as well check out all the amazing companies that are hiring like crazy right now.


How to Answer Behavioral Interview Questions – The Muse #question #answer.com


#answer the question

#

How to Answer Tell Me About a Time When. Interview Questions

You’ve reviewed your resume. practiced your elevator pitch. and reviewed a few stories you can share during the interview. All is well, and you’re feeling confident. And when the interviewer says, “Tell me about a time you disagreed with your supervisor,” you are ready to go and launch straight into a story about that one time you bravely confronted the director of marketing at your previous company about a new campaign you had a bad feeling about.

Okay, so maybe that doesn’t sound like you—yet. Let’s take a step back and talk about how you can get there.

Pick the Right Story

All these “Tell me about a time when…” questions require stories. As a hiring manager, it’s incredibly unsatisfying to interview someone who has no stories to share. After all, how can someone know what you can do if you can’t talk about what you’ve done? Don’t be that job candidate.

So, how do you find the right stories to share? Go through the job description and highlight all the soft skills that are featured. You’ll likely find things like “ability to work on a team and independently,” “comfort with multitasking,” or “strong communication skills.” Then, come up with an example of a time you demonstrated each of these traits—though keep in mind that you don’t necessarily need a different example for each. In fact, it’s better to come up with stories that are flexible, since you’ll likely have to adapt them to the exact questions anyway.

There are, of course, a few things that interviewers frequently like to ask about that will not be on the job descriptions. Be prepared for “negative” questions, like “Tell me about a time you had to deal with a conflict on your team” or “Tell me about a time you failed.” It’s not that interviewers are out to get you—how you handle conflict and failure are good things to know—it’s just not the best idea to put “must deal with frequent team conflict” in a job description.

Finally, brainstorm a few more questions that could potentially come up based on the position you’re applying for and your particular situation. For example, if you have a big gap on your resume, you’ll want to be prepared to talk about why you’re no longer at your previous job (more on that here ), or if you’re coming into a newly merged department, you should be prepared to discuss a time you’ve been part of a big change.

Make a Statement

Once you have your stories, it’s time to think a little deeper about why these questions are asked in the first place. What does the interviewer actually want to know?

Take a few seconds to think about this before you start answering the question—even if you have the perfect story prepared—so that you can make an appropriate introductory statement about essentially what the moral of your story is going to be. The reason for this is that even though the interviewer is specifically asking you to tell a story, the idea is that he or she will learn something about the way you do things. The problem with this is that what the interviewer gleans from your story could be very different from what you were hoping to share.

For example, say you tell that story about standing up to the director of marketing when asked to talk about conflict with a previous supervisor. You eloquently move through the story about how you shared your hesitation about the new marketing campaign to no avail, but once the initial numbers came in, it was clear that you were right. You triumphantly showed the performance to the director, and she agreed to scrap the campaign. While this story is definitely suitable, there are actually a few different ways it could be taken the wrong way. The interviewer could hone in on the fact that you really didn’t do anything until it was too late or that you were unpersuasive or a poor communicator the first time you raised concerns about the campaign.

To make sure your stories are as effective as possible, make a statement before you start telling the story. In this particular example, it might be something like this, “I learned early on in my professional career that it’s fine to disagree if you can back up your hunches with data.” Now, when you tell your story, it’s not about the various ways you could have approached the situation better, but about how you learned from that experience and how you use it to inform future disagreements.

Finish Strong

So, when it comes to these behavioral questions, have some stories prepared and then practice framing them based on the question you’re asked. Practice, practice, practice, and you’ll sound like a natural in no time. The final piece of the puzzle is wrapping up your answers well. You don’t want to ruin your perfect frame and story by ending your response with, “And… yeah.”

Instead, try connecting the story back to the company or position. Quickly explaining how your experience would be useful in the position you’re interviewing for is always a strong way to wrap up. Another way to finish up a response is to give the “in short” version of the answer. For example, “In short, it’s not that I’m an amazing multitasker—I just set and review my priorities frequently.” Wrapping up an interview answer (see more in-depth tips here ) is such a commonly neglected area of preparation, but it can really help you nail the “strong communicator” impression, so don’t disregard it when you’re practicing.

The thing people assume about these questions is that they’re all about the story. And, yes, that is a critical component. But even if your story isn’t exactly what the interview question asked for, if it’s framed well and you go the extra mile to tell the interviewer what he or she should take away from it, you’ll actually end up making a stronger impression.

So, don’t stress too much about having the perfect stories lined up or the exact relevant experience. Instead, focus on the messages you’re trying to communicate to the hiring manager, and back them up with the stories that you have.

Photo of quote courtesy of Shutterstock .

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How to Answer Behavioral Interview Questions – The Muse #webassign #answers


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How to Answer Tell Me About a Time When. Interview Questions

You’ve reviewed your resume. practiced your elevator pitch. and reviewed a few stories you can share during the interview. All is well, and you’re feeling confident. And when the interviewer says, “Tell me about a time you disagreed with your supervisor,” you are ready to go and launch straight into a story about that one time you bravely confronted the director of marketing at your previous company about a new campaign you had a bad feeling about.

Okay, so maybe that doesn’t sound like you—yet. Let’s take a step back and talk about how you can get there.

Pick the Right Story

All these “Tell me about a time when…” questions require stories. As a hiring manager, it’s incredibly unsatisfying to interview someone who has no stories to share. After all, how can someone know what you can do if you can’t talk about what you’ve done? Don’t be that job candidate.

So, how do you find the right stories to share? Go through the job description and highlight all the soft skills that are featured. You’ll likely find things like “ability to work on a team and independently,” “comfort with multitasking,” or “strong communication skills.” Then, come up with an example of a time you demonstrated each of these traits—though keep in mind that you don’t necessarily need a different example for each. In fact, it’s better to come up with stories that are flexible, since you’ll likely have to adapt them to the exact questions anyway.

There are, of course, a few things that interviewers frequently like to ask about that will not be on the job descriptions. Be prepared for “negative” questions, like “Tell me about a time you had to deal with a conflict on your team” or “Tell me about a time you failed.” It’s not that interviewers are out to get you—how you handle conflict and failure are good things to know—it’s just not the best idea to put “must deal with frequent team conflict” in a job description.

Finally, brainstorm a few more questions that could potentially come up based on the position you’re applying for and your particular situation. For example, if you have a big gap on your resume, you’ll want to be prepared to talk about why you’re no longer at your previous job (more on that here ), or if you’re coming into a newly merged department, you should be prepared to discuss a time you’ve been part of a big change.

Make a Statement

Once you have your stories, it’s time to think a little deeper about why these questions are asked in the first place. What does the interviewer actually want to know?

Take a few seconds to think about this before you start answering the question—even if you have the perfect story prepared—so that you can make an appropriate introductory statement about essentially what the moral of your story is going to be. The reason for this is that even though the interviewer is specifically asking you to tell a story, the idea is that he or she will learn something about the way you do things. The problem with this is that what the interviewer gleans from your story could be very different from what you were hoping to share.

For example, say you tell that story about standing up to the director of marketing when asked to talk about conflict with a previous supervisor. You eloquently move through the story about how you shared your hesitation about the new marketing campaign to no avail, but once the initial numbers came in, it was clear that you were right. You triumphantly showed the performance to the director, and she agreed to scrap the campaign. While this story is definitely suitable, there are actually a few different ways it could be taken the wrong way. The interviewer could hone in on the fact that you really didn’t do anything until it was too late or that you were unpersuasive or a poor communicator the first time you raised concerns about the campaign.

To make sure your stories are as effective as possible, make a statement before you start telling the story. In this particular example, it might be something like this, “I learned early on in my professional career that it’s fine to disagree if you can back up your hunches with data.” Now, when you tell your story, it’s not about the various ways you could have approached the situation better, but about how you learned from that experience and how you use it to inform future disagreements.

Finish Strong

So, when it comes to these behavioral questions, have some stories prepared and then practice framing them based on the question you’re asked. Practice, practice, practice, and you’ll sound like a natural in no time. The final piece of the puzzle is wrapping up your answers well. You don’t want to ruin your perfect frame and story by ending your response with, “And… yeah.”

Instead, try connecting the story back to the company or position. Quickly explaining how your experience would be useful in the position you’re interviewing for is always a strong way to wrap up. Another way to finish up a response is to give the “in short” version of the answer. For example, “In short, it’s not that I’m an amazing multitasker—I just set and review my priorities frequently.” Wrapping up an interview answer (see more in-depth tips here ) is such a commonly neglected area of preparation, but it can really help you nail the “strong communicator” impression, so don’t disregard it when you’re practicing.

The thing people assume about these questions is that they’re all about the story. And, yes, that is a critical component. But even if your story isn’t exactly what the interview question asked for, if it’s framed well and you go the extra mile to tell the interviewer what he or she should take away from it, you’ll actually end up making a stronger impression.

So, don’t stress too much about having the perfect stories lined up or the exact relevant experience. Instead, focus on the messages you’re trying to communicate to the hiring manager, and back them up with the stories that you have.

Photo of quote courtesy of Shutterstock .

More from this Author

Meet The Author

More from this Author

Hmmm, seems you ve already signed up for this class. While you re here, you may as well check out all the amazing companies that are hiring like crazy right now.